Archive for the ‘Protocols’ Category

Tutorial: Arduino UNO + Google's ADK

Monday, May 30th, 2011

[Alex TC] from [Bricogeek] posted a tutorial about how to interface Arduino and Android replacing the ADK shield by Google with commonc sensors and actuators.

[few days ago] ADK  was presented on Google’s blog, a platform that enables communication between Android and Arduino. The downside was that the development kit costs around 300 €.

Today we bring you a scoop. After seeing different people online who managed to run the ADK on  Arduino with a USB Host Shield controlling a servo or LED, we intend to play all the devices included in the kit but in our BricoGeek DIY version, with the products we have available in the store.

via [bricogeek]

Yahoo Farm From RoboFun Guys (at Yahoo Open Hack 2011)

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

[Viorel] wrote me about an interesting project he and his friends from Robofun developed during the 2011 Yahoo Open Hack in Bucharest, and won the Hacker’s Choice Award. The diorama becomes a physical representation of tour friends’ behaviours.

If you’re a both nature lover and a geek, you would certainly love the Yahoo Farm. The Yahoo Farm is a 60 cm wide diorama, sitting in your bedroom and bringing you online data from the Yahoo ecosystem.

For example, the wind mill rotation below is directly controlled by the wind speed outside (being connected to the Yahoo Weather API), the hand-painted backgrounds are switched according to the weather state, a new sheep is coming out of the barn each time one of your friends gets online on Yahoo Messenger, and each new email lights up a fruit in the Email Tree.

Give a look at the presentation used for the 90 seconds pitch during the event.

via [Technorama.ro]

RESTduino – Arduino Hacking For The REST Of Us

Thursday, April 28th, 2011

Nice RESTduino demo #1 by [Jason Gullickson]: what is RESTduino?

RESTduino is a simple sketch to provide a REST-like interface to the Arduino via the Ethernet Shield. The idea is to allow developers familiar with interacting with REST services with a way to control physical devices using the Arduino (without having to write any Arduino code).

Of course some flexibility is traded for this convenience; only basic operations are currently supported:

  • Digital pin I/O (HIGH, LOW and PWM)
  • Analog pin input

Later versions of the sketch may provide additional functionality (servo control, etc.) however if you need more than just basic pin control you’re probably better off learning the basics of programming the Arduino and offloading some of your processing to the board itself.

via [Jason Gullickson] and its [GitHub]

New SerialToSocket Proxy For Arduino

Wednesday, April 27th, 2011

As [Kalanda] published on its blog (spanish)  and github, there is one more (easier) way to establish connection with an Arduino over a network connection (among the others):

serial2socket-proxy is a cross-platform software application developed in Processing for creating a virtual connection between the serial port and a network socket port.

For example, you can control an Arduino board connected to the serial port from any computer over internet. Also you can use this socket connection for communicate with your arduino board from Flash/Air application programmed in Actionscript, a PHP application or whatever language that can access to a socket

via [Kalanda's Github] and [blog]

Vibratron Robot Plays Out Midi As Steel Balls

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

As part of the National Robotics Week coverage of iheartrobotics, the Vibratron:

[...]the newest member of the RobOrchestra. This amazing musician was built by club members with a total budget of $1000. The Vibratron uses an Arduino Mega to control 30 individual solenoid gates which drop steel balls onto the vibration keys. Using the Arduino Mega they were able to avoid complications with multiplexing I/O lines. Notes are read in using a MIDI shield to receive standard MIDI signals from a sequencer or keyboard. The balls are recirculated using an Archimedes screw to raise them to the bucket at the top.

(more…)

Arduino Midi Rainbow

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

Last week I was in Rome for the Arduino Day. I was amazed by the projects and the people there: true Arduino fans. This is the first post about some of those projects: more soon.

[anbello] generates – via MIDI – different light patterns on a strip of addressable RGB LED

MIDI messages from the keyboard (real or simulated on PC) enter the MIDI Shield’s MIDI IN and are presented to the Arduino serial port. The Arduino firmware interprets the MIDI messages NoteOn NoteOff, associates each key on the five octaves (60 keys) keyboard to a strip LED and lights it with color associated with the note. In the firmware to control the strip we used the FastSPI_LED library that allows you to address every single LED and turn the desired color (R, G, B).
One interesting thing to note is the use of the firmaware function millis() to implement a sort of elementary multitasking. The idea was taken from this post after user “westfw” on the Arduino forum.

I really appreciate the effort of translating the post. Check the code and part list on [Sululab]

 

Tokyo Hackerspace/RDTN Geiger Shield

Thursday, April 14th, 2011

Japan’s difficoult moment has challenged many Arduino users (I can count at least three different threads on the forum about geiger tube & sensors lately  1, 2, 3). As David posted some time ago, the need of an open, net-spreaded visualization of the real level of radioactivity was heavily felt by the community, also for  trasparency reasons.  This is when the Geiger shield comes in:

This is an Arduino-based geiger counter shield that makes it easy to upload data to the internet and also interchange tubes. Since it’s open source and Arduino-based, its also easy to hack this to other interesting applications.

you can follow on  [TokyoHackerspace] the all process of prototyping.

More Lufa Hacks: Keyboard, Mouse, and MIDI.

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

[Darran] played around LUFA firmwares on the Arduino UNO and Arduino 2560. It seems now LUFA hacking is getting more and more common among Arduino users.

I’ve published the source, hex files, and sample sketches for Keyboard HID, Mouse HID, and USB MIDI drivers for the UNO and Mega2560 on http://hunt.net.nz/users/darran.

The LUFA project has made this fairly easy to do which is great, the only drawback is the limitation of only 4KB of flash space for the driver in the atmega8u2.

via [hunt.net]

HIDUINO: Arduino talking MIDI

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Some time ago [ant.b]  from the Arduino Forum manage to reflash the Atmega8u with other LUFA Firmwares. [Dimitri Diakopoulos] has recently developed a similar approach for his HIDUINO project. Very good explanation & references.  Diakopoulos succeded to make Arduino show up as a MIDI Device:

LUFA powers the HIDUINO project in that it handles most of the low-level USB-HID implementation while exposing an API for developing other HID-compliant devices like MIDI.

The USB-HID specification has a specific type for MIDI input and MIDI output, which nearly all commercial musical controllers on the market use for class-compliant (driverless!) MIDI I/O.

Check out guide for ISP flashing, on the project page hosted on googleCode.

via [HackADay], source [HIDUINO]

 

Arduino Candy Grabber, Web Controlled.

Thursday, March 31st, 2011

A step-by-step guide on controlling physical things (like grabbing candies with a mechanical arm) via Internet (please, try!).

In this instructable you will learn how to connect to your arduino and control it over the net, set up a video stream, and how to control stuff with your arduino all in realtime. I’ll try to show you on a concrete example how this could be done, but the code I used and wrote is going to be generic so you can use it for your projects. Note that I haven’t discovered anything new but rather used code that I found lying around the net, built from it and changed it fit my needs.

(…) So how should it work? The idea is that there is a Flash AIR app on my home computer that when a remote client connects to it starts the video broadcast. The communication between the client and the AIR app would be through a PHP socket because it can instantly push messages from one to the other. The socket will handle all the clients and the queuing. The Red5 server is used to handle the video broadcast, stream the video and send the arduino commands from the client that is first in the queue to the AIR app (although it could do so much more… we’ll talk about that in a later step). Finally TinkerProxy is used to send commands from the AIR app to the arduino that is connected to the same computer.

Thanks to Mario for the link!

via [Instructables], grab the thing [here]