Archive for the ‘Vintage’ Category

A tribute to 5-bit Baudot code

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

05emile

Julian Hespenheide is an interaction designer based in Germany who submitted to Arduino blogpost a writing machine called émile. It’s an interactive installation created in collaboration with Irena Kukric, David Beermann, Jasna Dimitrovskais and using Baudot code - a binary 5-bit code, predecessor of ASCII and EBCDID – intended for telecommunication and electronic devices, representing the entire alphabet. (more…)

Wood Lizzie is a DIY Soap Box Cart controlled via Wi-Fi

Monday, October 13th, 2014

soapcart

In the following 10-minute video, the Currah team is showing us all the details of Wood Lizzie, a project experimenting with Arduino Mega and Wi-Fi Shield, a very flexible steering system and the virtually unlimited control range afforded by WiFi and Internet Protocol:

The original plan was to construct one of the two-wheeled robots very popular with hobbyists but it was eventually decided that the resulting vehicle would be of very limited application and capable only of traversing smooth surfaces. However, note that the current design can be viewed as the drive of a two-wheeled robot coupled with a trailer by means of a 360 degree pivot. A slip ring capsule within the pivot enables the heavy battery and bulky control system to be separated from the drive and located on the trailer thereby distributing weight evenly between the four wheels.

soapcart-inside

DIY soap-carts were pretty common among kids in the first part of the 20th century and built from old pram wheels, scrap wood and, typically, soap boxes. They could provide a lot of fun for the family at very low cost and in recent years there’s a new interest in them especially to those appreciating their vintage look!

 

Retro Pinball Clock Hack

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

[Alan Amon] posted a cool vintage hack on Instructables, adding GPS-based clock funcionalities to a Bally Wizard pinball.

Pinball machine will automatically power up at the preset time each day and then resets to display the current time, the year, the time the alarm is set for and the date month/day. Then as long as the GPS has a signal the time will update once a minute for the rest of the day.  At the time you would like to go to bed the Arduino will cut power to the game and it will remain off until the alarm time. Should you have a power failure in the night the machine will not lose it’s settings. If power is restored prior to the alarm time the machine will wake up as normal, otherwise the machine will wake up once power is restored.

If the game is powered on because it is not yet bed time and it is after the alarm time then at 12am, 1am or 1pm the game will do a full reset. This makes sure the clock hasn’t gotten off due to a stuck score reel, keeps the time in a 12 hour format and keeps the date display up to date.

Have a look at the “cool features” and “coolest features” in the instructables article

via [PCWorld] source [Instructables]

Arduino Based KENBAK Computer

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

Kenbak  computer (claimed to be one of the first personal computer – 1971) has come back from the shadows of the past.

I’d been thinking for a while that emulating an old-school switches-and-lamps computer would be a fun Arduino project, but had stalled looking at things like the Altair 8800 with its 30+ lights and 20+ switches. However, when I stumbled upon the Kenbak I thought it was something I could pull off as my first real Arduino project. Naturally I called it the KENBAK-uino
This is the end-product, it can be programmed via the buttons on the front panel and show outputs on the LEDs. It’s a faithful emulation of the original CPU but with a few enhancements thrown in like pre-loaded sample programs and access to a real time clock.

via flickr (set), (videos) (code).

Light Drive: Light Painting With Arduino

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011

[Kim Pimmel] made nice light-painting stop-motion animations using an Arduino Bluetooth, Processing and some post-production.

The video is stop motion, so every frame is an individually shot photograph. Each photograph is a long exposure photo, with exposures reaching up to 20 seconds in some cases.

To control the lights, I used an Arduino controlled via bluetooth to drive a stepper motor. The stepper motor controls the movements of the lights remotely from Processing.

via [Pimmel's Vimeo] more on [Flickr]

Gameduino Brings Vintage Gaming Back

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

If Kickstarter is nowadays best place to find new (or upcoming) toys to dream about, Gameduino is probably one of the most amazing pieces of hardware I’ve seen hosted there. The shield mounts its own FPGA able of 80ies style graphics and sounds for creating old-school, 8-bit video-games, pre-loaded with numerous sprites and set up for easy connection to a VGA display.

Gameduino is a game adapter for Arduino – or anything else with an SPI interface – built as a single shield that stacks up on top of the Arduino and has plugs for a VGA monitor and stereo speakers.

The sound and graphics are definitely old-school, but thanks to the latest FPGA technology, the sprite capabilities are a step above those in machines from the past.

  • video output is 400×300 pixels in 512 colors
  • all color processed internally at 15-bit precision
  • compatible with any standard VGA monitor (800×600 @ 72Hz)
  • background graphics
    • 512×512 pixel character background
    • 256 characters, each with independent 4 color palette
    • pixel-smooth X-Y wraparound scroll
  • foreground graphics
    • each sprite is 16×16 pixels with per-pixel transparency
    • each sprite can use 256, 16 or 4 colors
    • four-way rotate and flip
    • 96 sprites per scan-line, 1536 texels per line
    • pixel-perfect sprite collision detection
  • audio output is a stereo 12-bit frequency synthesizer
  • 16 independent voices 10-4000 Hz
  • per-voice sine wave or white noise

Have a look at the nice reference poster, its detailed hardware reference or its set of sample programs and library.

support this project on [Kickstarter], via [CrunchGear] [BoingBoing] source [ExCamera]

Ideo’s C6O REDUX Brings Mixtapes Back

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Ideo worked on the changing relationship we have towards music, adding a new, dynamic yet vintage approach:

The concept behind the C60 Redux is this: We’ve gone from handling vinyl, tapes and CD’s to clicking on MP3’s, losing tactility in the process and making a casualty of the mix tape. Is it possible to bring that back in a digital way? Bone, Johnson, and a group of IDEO designers endeavored to do so by creating a music player built with RFID readers and some Arduino Mini Pros, all housed in a record player case

(more…)

Ideo's C6O REDUX Brings Mixtapes Back

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Ideo worked on the changing relationship we have towards music, adding a new, dynamic yet vintage approach:

The concept behind the C60 Redux is this: We’ve gone from handling vinyl, tapes and CD’s to clicking on MP3’s, losing tactility in the process and making a casualty of the mix tape. Is it possible to bring that back in a digital way? Bone, Johnson, and a group of IDEO designers endeavored to do so by creating a music player built with RFID readers and some Arduino Mini Pros, all housed in a record player case

(more…)

HackVision now available

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

As I read in the Forum, the latest NootropicDesign Product has bees released:

Hackvision is a simple, retro gaming platform based on Arduino technology that you can assemble and connect to your TV. You can write you own games and make your own controllers!

The price goes from $37.95 (kit) to $47.95 (assembled).

Features

  • NO Arduino is required. Based on Arduino technology so you can write your own games and upload them using the Arduino IDE. All you need is a USB to TTL serial cable or adapter.
  • Connects directly to your TV with standard RCA connections. One for audio, one for video. Works with NTSC or PAL (Europe, Africa, Asia, South America) TVs.
  • Integrated button controller right on the PCB.
  • Preloaded with awesome Space Invaders and Pong games. More games coming. You can write them, too!
  • Other controllers supported: Wii nunchuk, SuperNES, or paddle controllers you can make from a potentiometer and button. Or invent your own.
  • Software libraries for game development and controller support.
  • High score files stored in EEPROM so they are retained even with power off.
  • All unused pins broken out to pads for your hacking pleasure.
  • Non-conductive adhesive foam pad protects the bottom of the board from your fingers.
  • All through-hole components. Kit can be assembled in 30-45 min. Fully assembled and tested units will also be available.
  • Additional accessories available in the nootropic design store including 9V adapters, RCA cables, Wii nunchuk breakout boards, paddle controller kits, USB-serial adapters, etc.
  • Makes a great gift!

Technical Specs

  • ATmega328 microcontroller with Arduino bootloader
  • Monochrome video
  • Resolution is 136×96 pixels (You can control this in your own games)
  • Requires 9V power supply with center-positive 2.1mm barrel plug

via [nootropicDesign]

HackVision now available

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

As I read in the Forum, the latest NootropicDesign Product has bees released:

Hackvision is a simple, retro gaming platform based on Arduino technology that you can assemble and connect to your TV. You can write you own games and make your own controllers!

The price goes from $37.95 (kit) to $47.95 (assembled).

Features

  • NO Arduino is required. Based on Arduino technology so you can write your own games and upload them using the Arduino IDE. All you need is a USB to TTL serial cable or adapter.
  • Connects directly to your TV with standard RCA connections. One for audio, one for video. Works with NTSC or PAL (Europe, Africa, Asia, South America) TVs.
  • Integrated button controller right on the PCB.
  • Preloaded with awesome Space Invaders and Pong games. More games coming. You can write them, too!
  • Other controllers supported: Wii nunchuk, SuperNES, or paddle controllers you can make from a potentiometer and button. Or invent your own.
  • Software libraries for game development and controller support.
  • High score files stored in EEPROM so they are retained even with power off.
  • All unused pins broken out to pads for your hacking pleasure.
  • Non-conductive adhesive foam pad protects the bottom of the board from your fingers.
  • All through-hole components. Kit can be assembled in 30-45 min. Fully assembled and tested units will also be available.
  • Additional accessories available in the nootropic design store including 9V adapters, RCA cables, Wii nunchuk breakout boards, paddle controller kits, USB-serial adapters, etc.
  • Makes a great gift!

Technical Specs

  • ATmega328 microcontroller with Arduino bootloader
  • Monochrome video
  • Resolution is 136×96 pixels (You can control this in your own games)
  • Requires 9V power supply with center-positive 2.1mm barrel plug

via [nootropicDesign]