Archive for the ‘robot’ Category

Watch a fin-propelled underwater robot prototype

Wednesday, November 25th, 2015


The robotic prototype swimming under water propelled by fins, it was developed at the Control Systems and Robotics Laboratory of the Technological Educational Institute of Crete, in Heraklion (Greece) and it’s controlled by an Arduino Mega:

Each fin is comprised of three individually actuated fin rays, which are interconnected by an elastic membrane. An on-board microcontroller generates the rays’ motion pattern that result in the fins’ undulations, through which propulsion is obtained. The prototype, which is fully untethered and energetically autonomous, also integrates an IMU/AHRS unit for navigation purposes, a wireless communication module, and an on-board video camera. The video contains footage from experiments conducted in a laboratory test tank to investigate closed loop motion control strategies, as well as footage from sea trials.

the Arduino runs a custom-developed real time firmware that implements two Central Pattern Generator (CPG) networks to generate the undulatory motion profile for the robot’s fins. The robot  contains a  7.4V lipo battery powering also a Bluetooth module for wireless communication and a video camera to record footage of the missions.



A spider quadrobot built with Prusa and Arduino Pro Mini

Monday, September 14th, 2015


It takes 14 steps, a Prusa i3 3D printer and a lot of soldering to build Spider Robot v3.0, a quad robot running on Arduino Pro Mini.  That’s what told us  RegisHsu, a maker who shared his project’s tutorial on Instructables and the 3d printable files on Thingiverse.

It took 12 months of work to build the robot and it reached the fourth generation of  design, that you can explore on his blog  if you are interested in its history: (more…)

Follow your cat with FPV camera and Arduino Leonardo

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014


After the Bike Tachometer we posted back in September, Nikus  shared with us a new Instructable to show you how to build remote-controlled tank using a first person view (FPV) camera and Arduino Leonardo: (more…)

Freefall camera: an autonomous skydiving robot

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014


A group of skydivers and engineers, combined their passions to create the world’s first autonomous skydiving robot, equipped by a camera and controlled by Arduino Mega.

ArduinoMega Freefallcamera

The Freefall Camera is a student project at the University of Nottingham, its team is composed by David Alatorre, Tom Dryden, Tom Shorten and Peter Storey who received the third prize at the Student Venture Challenge from the Haydn Green Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. (more…)

Four guys met at Arduino Day and now they are finalists at NASA Challenge

Monday, May 26th, 2014

Open Curiosity

Last March, during Arduino Day in Zaragoza, four guys met for the first time and  then decided to participate to the Nasa Challenge collaborating to the project made by Carlos Sicilia Til in the previews months:

OpenCuriosity is an open source, exomars rover (1:5 scale) with Arduino as main controller, based on the NASA Curiosity Rover. It contains a set of Arduino boards and sensors. The general public will be allowed to use these Arduinos and sensors for their own creative purposes while they are in space. All the people will be allowed to integrate their project in the robot, and the data gathered will be available on the internet in order to share this information with the general public for educational, science or other purposes. We want to provide affordable space exploration for everyone!

The robot designed by the Aragonese team is now among the finalists of the NASA contest!

Read the details of the story on El Pais.

The donation robot

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014


Holger from Fablab Düsseldorf writes in about a small robot they prototyped with Arduino Uno, helping them  raise some funds for their local space:

We created the idea in our non-commerical FabLab in Düsseldorf, Germany to create a small robot, who makes our vistors and guests aware of placing a small money donation. This robot was required to be transportable, robust and to draw as much attention as possible.
Thus, we included LED-Stripes, servos, sensors and sound to the project. Packed in a very old german vacuum cleaner. The work took about 1 year to construct, print and integrate all 3D-printed parts, wiring and software development with the Arduino Uno. But software development was the minor part, although parallel processing on the Arduino in order to run every component simultaneously required a small trick.


Following lines, going to the rescue with Arduino Robot – Video Tutorial

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013



Once again Xun and David in this fourth video tutorial on the Arduino Robot released by RS Components, are exploring one of the most used techniques in Robotics: following a line, just like factory robots do to get an orientation when they carry objects from one place to another without human intervention.

Watching the video you’ll learn how to create a racing track drawing a black line over a white surface and understand how the different sensors read data that will be used to feed a PD algorithm: (more…)

Moti on Kickstarter: spin the dials and the motors follow!

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

moti on kickstarted

Moti is a smart motor you can control from an app . It allows to use your fingers directly on the screen to move the motor, adjust speed with sliders and even program motions with simple building blocks. You can attach it to any kind of objects and bring them to life with intuitive and easily understandable steps.

At the same time Moti is advanced enough to satisfy makers and developers who are looking to build complex robots. Each one is programmable with Arduino, has bunch of built-in sensors, daisy-chains, and even has a web-API so you can develop sites and games for your robot. (more…)

Introducing the Arduino TFT LCD screen

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013



In conjunction with the release of the new version of the Arduino IDE and the Arduino Robot, we’re also putting out a TCT LCD screen. The screen was developed in conjunction with Complubot and the library relies on the Adafruit GFX and ST7735 libraries.

The screen lets you do all sorts of fun things, like play games or lose the serial monitor to see the values from sensors.

The Arduino specific library, named TFT, extends the Adafruit libraries to support  more Processing-like methods. You can write text, draw shapes, and show bitmap images on the screen in a way that should be familiar to users of Processing.

The screen works well with all types of Arduinos with a little bit of wiring, and fits perfectly in the Esplora and Robot sockets. In addition to all this other goodness, there’s a SD card slot on the back for storing pictures and other data.

If you want to learn more about the screen and what it’s capable of, check out the TFT library page, getting started guide, and product page.

You can buy the TFT screen from the Arduino store now!

If you have something cool you’ve made with this, let us know!

Introducing New Arduino Column on Make

Wednesday, May 15th, 2013

Make the future with Arduino

As Ken Denmead, MAKE Editorial Director, announced some hours ago we are also thrilled for the monthly column Massimo’s is going to write for MAKE blog. We’ve been brainstorming on the title and the final choice is “MAKE the Future with Arduino” :

Massimo will share his unique perspective on the Arduino platform, including insight on the development of the boards, new products, and exciting projects for Arduino fans to share and adapt. Indeed, today’s first column is a preview of an exciting new Arduino product that will be unveiled to the world at Maker Faire Bay Area this week—the Arduino Robot.


Enjoy the article  and stay tuned for more news!