Archive for the ‘Nano’ Category

Listening to the sound of a 300-million-year-old disc

Monday, October 5th, 2015


There’s a mineral called pyrite with a interesting nickname, fool’s gold, because it has a superficial resemblance to gold and it’s by far the most frequently mineral mistaken for gold. Even if it’s pretty abundant, there’s a rare form of pyrite which is crystallised in radial shape (as unusual disc spherulites), taking the shape of a disc. The amazing fact is that the only deposit where pyrites of such morphology are found is in Illinois (USA) and the discs are dated around 300 million years ago!

Dmitry Morozov (aka ::vtol::), a media artist living in Moscow, had the chance to use a pyrite disc and created Ra,  a sound object / synthesizer running on Arduino Nano. Ra uses laser for scanning the irregularities of the surface of the disc and further transforms this data to produce sound: (more…)

Visualizing air quality with interactive origami flowers

Monday, September 28th, 2015


“Under the Dome – PMgami” is an installation created by designer Jiayu  Lui using Arduino Nano. Inspired by paper origami techniques, the digitally fabricated flowers move and change color according to the quality of air measured locally. The main aim of the installation is to obtain a more intuitive way to communicate pollution data and  the relationship between technology and nature.

In the gallery you can explore some other pictures and the schematic. Check the video below to see the installation in action! (more…)

A diy electronic remake of a … Phenakistoscope

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014


Phenakistoscope is one of the first motion graphics device from the XIXth century made by Santi of Playmode, an audiovisual research studio based in Barcelona area:

I used a recycled stepper motor from an old printer as the motion source, attaching a CD clip to it so that we could make the CDs rotate at a stable velocity. The CDs were completed with a sticked paper with classical and brand-new phenakistoscope patterns.
By synchronising the strobe frequency of a white led stripe with the motor rotation, we accomplish the image-in-motion effect on the eye. (more…)