Archive for the ‘Micro’ Category

A DIY Seizure Alarm based on Arduino Micro

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015

seizurealarm

Chad Herbert’s son Daniel was diagnosed with Benign Rolandic Epilepsy in 2014. It’s a type of epilepsy the Epilepsy Foundation says accounts for about 15 percent of all Epilepsies in children and the good news is that most children grow out of it.

The bad news is that Daniel’s most affected by his condition at night or early morning while he sleeps. That’s why Chad invested in a sleep monitor/alarm for his bed that detects when he’s having a full tonic-clonic seizure. (more…)

An open hardware quartz crystal microbalance

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

openQCM

Marco Mauro is a physicist currently employed as Scientific Coordinator at Novaetech, the first Spin-off Company of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) in Italy. He shared with us all the info about a project he’s been working on  and based on Arduino Micro.

OpenQCM is a fully open source scientific microbalance capable of weighing mass deposition down to 1 billionth of gram: (more…)

Make a 3D printed LEGO-compatible Arduino Micro casing

Thursday, January 15th, 2015

750x750_54b56ee09f1a96.28859536

Here we are after winter break with a new tutorial on 3d printing with Arduino Materia 101. The 5-step tutorial allows you to design a Lego-compatible case for the Arduino Micro to be used together with the power function IR-receiver mentioned in this other Tutorial. (more…)

Programmable 3d-printed decorations for your Xmas

Wednesday, December 17th, 2014

3dprint-star

We can’t miss the chance to play with some LEDs now that holidays are coming and mix some electronics with 3d printing on Materia 101.

In the tutorial of this Kristoffer is experimenting on Xmas decorations, Arduino Micro and some code to play around with. (more…)

7 brushless pumps for a fountain controlled by Arduino Micro

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

fountain
Using Arduino Micro to control a fountain is the project shared by Michael Diesing on Twitter:

May I introduce my second ARDUINO-project with own pcb. With the pcb I am able to drive seven brushless pumps(with integrated electronics). The “problem” with such kind of pumps is that they don’t accept unfiltered pwm-signals as supply voltage. So I created a circuit where the pwm-signals of an ARDUINO-micro are level-shifted to 12V with a darlington array and afterwards filtered with a 1 uF ceramic capacitor and a 730 Ohm resistor (low pass filter). The signals are then led into the adjust-pins of seven “lm317″s. To work properly I needed to connect the adjust-pins also with 2500 Ohm resistors to gnd, but I found out that with two l293d instead of the used TDP62783 (darlington array) these resistors are not needed, but different resistor and capacitor values for adequate filtering!
The pums also have tacho signals which I connected via schottky-diodes to the ARDUINO (inputs with pullup). With the tacho-signals I am able to find out if pumps are stuck, are sucking air or are not connected.
Additionally I added one ACS712-05B current sensor (which measures the entire current of the circuit) that could be used to find out if pumps that don’t have tacho-signals are working properly. At the moment it is not used.
Besides that I integrated a lm386 audio-amp used to amplify the signal of an electret-mic to a level that is suitable for the ATEMGA’s ADC.

As the first project for the pcb I created a fountain consisting of a shortened wine barrel, seven brushless pumps, a pushbutton with led and pebbles (s. video).
There are seven animation-modes which can be selected via the pushbutton (the selected mode is stored in eeprom).
The speed of the pumps is checked permanently during operation.
The average power consumption is ~20W and max. consumption is 30W.

(more…)

Build a 3d-printed remote control box with the help of Materia 101

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

MicroCase

One of the pleasures of watching TV depends on the use of a remote control that allows you to change channels from where you are. In the tutorial of this week, Kristoffer made an add-on to a previous lesson teaching us how to control a computer with a remote control like the one of your TV using Arduino Micro, IR-sensor. The add-on is a custom and colourful 3d-printed case created with Freecad and Materia 101.

Follow the 12 steps of the lesson on Scuola >> (more…)

Earthquakes reinterpreted by the human body become art

Saturday, November 29th, 2014

simograph0

“Earth Partitions” installation by artist Melik Ohanian was exhibited at the Centre d’Art Contemporain à Sète in France and it’s composed by two synchronized videos with a dancer and a seismogram, the second being “written” by the first.

The dancer with two controllers in the hands was asked to “translate” into corporal expression and movements what he saw in a seismogram of an earthquake . His movements were consequently “translated back” to a seismogram using a device. Both the mime and the seismograph were filmed at the same time and both were then broadcasted simultaneously on two different screens during the exhibition. (more…)

Gravity Touch bluetooth Glove powered by Arduino Micro

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

ARglove

Arduino user Jubeso submitted to our blog an instructable explaining the 10 steps to build an input device for gaming.

The  Gravity Touch bluetooth glove  is specifically designed to interact with augmented reality glasses like the Google Glass, Meta, Moverio BT or with the VR headsets like Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR, vrAse, Durovis Dive: (more…)

A Speed Suit Activated with Motion #ArduinoMicroMonday

Monday, June 9th, 2014

speedsuit

Instructables user Beaconsfield posted a great project of a suit controlled by  Arduino Micro, lighting up EL wires when the wearer starts to walk and lights them up completely when the wearer runs or dances:

Most of the time EL wire is used as is, with manual on/off control. However, I wanted to control it with an Arduino, so it would react to results from a sensor. This motion-activated suit flashes when the wearer starts to walk and lights up completely when the wearer runs. Perfect for those late-night runs! (or dance parties – it lights up when the wearer moves, and this includes dancing) (more…)

Swimming Mermaid LED Tail #arduinomicromonday

Monday, April 7th, 2014

glimmer mermeid

Glimmer the Mermaid is an incredible project by Erin St. Blaine:  it uses about 180 Adafruit Neopixels, an Arduino Micro to control them and silicone. To change  animations and brightness she added a bluetooth module to connect it to an Android tablet:

(more…)