Archive for the ‘Mega’ Category

Turn an old payphone into a boombox for ’90s hits

Tuesday, November 29th, 2016

If you grew up in the ’90s and would love to play some of your favorite hit songs through something a bit more nostalgic than your smartphone, perhaps you can do what “digital alchemist” Fuzzy Wobble has done and transform an old-school payphone into a fully-functional boombox.

Fuzzy Wobble was able to get his hands on an inexpensive payphone and hacked it using an Arduino Mega, an Adafruit MP3 Maker Shield, a 20W amplifier, a 20W speaker, and some other components. The unique boombox is also equipped with a rangefinder that detects whenever someone walks by, triggering the phone to ring and enticing someone to answer the call. (more…)

A wakeup light for kids

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

In order to convince his kids to stay in bed just a little longer, Maker Ralph Crutzen has created a “wakeup light” using an Arduino Mega and an RGB LED strip.

Those of us that have toddlers know that they can wake up very early. If you’d like to get some more sleep without leaving them unsupervised to dangerously play with your electronics and power tools, then a “wakeup light” could be a good solution. (more…)

Burn EPROMs with an Arduino Mega

Thursday, November 10th, 2016

If you’ve got a cartridge-based gaming system, this EPROM burner will let you load whatever game you want!

Robson Couto recently acquired an old SNES. A great console for its time, but it only came with one cartridge, a bootleg copy of Mortal Kombat. Legalities aside, he decided that he would experiment with his own bootleg cartridge creator via an EPROM burner made as an Arduino Mega shield.

His process involves finding an unwanted game cartridge (he prefers sports, though your results may vary), burn the ROM, then exchange the cartridge ROM for the newly-burned ROM. (more…)

Become a pinball wizard on this 3D-printed machine

Monday, November 7th, 2016

“Tony the Pinball Wizard” has successfully 3D-printed a fully-functional pinball machine.

The retired software engineer provides a detailed writeup, beginning with pinball’s roots in the 1700s to its eventual fall from popularity in the 1990s and 2000s. If you find this interesting, you could likely pick one up on Craigslist, but Tony instead decided to build his own.

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These Makers built a gesture-controlled robotic arm

Friday, November 4th, 2016

Using a Kinect sensor with MATLAB/Simulink and an Arduino, B.Avinash and J.Karthikeyan made a robotic arm to mimic their every move.

If you need a robotic arm to follow your movements, the Kinect sensor is a great place to start. On the other hand, it’s a long leap programming-wise to go from sensor input to coordinated movement of servo motors. Through a toolchain stretching from the sensor itself, to a computer, and finally to an Arduino Mega controlling the servos directly, Avinash and Karthikeyan did just that. (more…)

Automated pumpkin patch to scare trick-or-treaters!

Thursday, October 27th, 2016

Using eight jack-o’-lanterns and an Arduino Mega, “CrankyCoder” built his own automated pumpkin patch.

CrankyCoder’s favorite holiday, as well as his family’s, is Halloween. After creating a skull that follows people around a few years ago, he decided to take things up a notch with his “Creepy Pumpkin Patch.” His patch includes eight pumpkins on the edges of a path with homemade pressure switches in between. As trick-or-treaters walk by, the patch is activated, making the pumpkins spin creepily.

Cleverly, CrankyCoder employs two pie pans with marbles in between for each rotating pumpkin, creating ball bearings to support the weight. Also, instead of a candle or other complicated electronics, he’s using flickering LEDs from the dollar store to produce a creepy lighting effect.

With Halloween just days away, be sure to check out the project’s video seen here or its GitHub page to get started on your own Creepy Pumpkin Patch.

The GoonieBox challenges guests to solve its riddles

Friday, October 21st, 2016

Inspired by The Goonies movie and The Room game, Guido Bonelli has constructed a piece of Arduino-controlled interactive furniture to entertain his guests.

After what appears to be a massive amount of work involving 3D printing, laser cutting, wiring, and programming, Bonelli has come up with a puzzle box that shouldn’t need any explanation. Using button presses and other interactions with it, participants are able to unlock a treasure box in the bottom, a working wooden safe! (more…)

Cutting cable with scissors and Arduino

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

2PrintBeta solves the problem of cutting multiple cables with an innovative scissors setup.

At times, the 3D printing and engineering company 2PrintBeta needs to cut wires and other assorted materials to length. Sure, they could simply cut them by hand, but that takes time and their business is growing. An industrial cable cutter is quite expensive, so being an engineering company, they decided to make their own using a rather rugged pair of scissors actuated by a bolt attached to a drive disk.

For this operation, wire feeding is done by a pair of 3D-printed wheels, and the “brains of the operation” is provided by an Arduino Mega using stepper motor drivers. (more…)

Square Off is a chess board with a high-tech twist

Monday, October 17th, 2016

If you love chess, but aren’t thrilled about playing it on an app, the InfiVention team has just the board for you.

The origin of the game chess is a fascinating and somewhat unknown tale, stretching continents and many hundreds of years. In the last 25 or so years, however, it has gone from a game played on a beautiful board with finely crafted pieces, to something played on a computer or smartphone. Perhaps this is a good thing, since finding competition is as easy as signing into the correct game.

On the other hand, this type of play looses a lot of charm, and you can’t exactly pass the app on your beat up smartphone to your kids one day. Attempting to fill in the gap is the amazing automated board called “Square Off.” With an Arduino Mega 2560 at its core, it automatically moves the pieces, and detects where you move, allowing you to play in the real world with someone remotely–even if he or she is merely using a tablet! (more…)

A sheet metal Arduino MP3 alarm clock

Wednesday, October 5th, 2016

Wake up to your favorite tunes using this beautiful sheet metal alarm clock!

If you need to get up for work, class, or simply to avoid wasting the day away, setting an alarm is the obvious solution. Sure, you could buy a clock or just use your phone, but if you build Dejan Nedelkovski’s Arduino-based device, you can be reminded of your awesome Maker skills every morning. (more…)

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