Archive for the ‘MIDI’ Category

Musician creates MIDI-triggered LED cubes with Arduino

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

For the release of his latest EP, Dario Marturano brought together electronic music, technology, science, and dance to create an awe-inspiring music video called “Pyrite.” The artist (and STEAM advocate), who goes by the stage name Holograph, built a set of illuminated cubes using plexiglass boxes and LED strips that are MIDI-triggered via Arduino circuitry. (more…)

Play some Super Arduino Bros. tunes with percussion

Monday, July 11th, 2016

Have you ever wished your Arduino project could play tunes, or even just note-based sound effects? Connor Nishijima has, and that’s why over the last three years he has been hard at work developing Miduino—a free web service that enables Makers to automatically convert their MIDI music into ready-made sketches.

Unlike any built-in Arduino noisemaking functions such as tone(), Miduino’s output is polyphonic–meaning you can play up to six notes at once. Most recently, he has added two major updates to the service: percussion tracking and switch to software-based timing.

Now the only thing setting your Arduino apart from an NES is a proper triangle wave! While it’s not fully featured yet for the whole MIDI percussion spectrum, your basic snares, kicks and hi-hats will be joining the music!

Originally I collaborated with Len Shustek to tie his Playtune library into the service, but his library requires a hardware timer for each active note–which has its ups and downs.

With a hardware timer you’ll get extremely crisp sound every time, but an Arduino Uno can only play up to three notes at once and the original code didn’t know what to do with MIDI percussion channels.

Instead, Nishijima is polling for new notes and their expirations at about 22,050Hz using Timer 1 and generating different types of percussion with some RNG tricks. Admittedly it hasn’t been perfected yet, as some songs need the polling frequency turned down to avoid crashes. (Cut the Arduino some slack, it’s not supposed to be good at this!)

To demonstrate his latest upgrades, Nishijima performs the Super Mario Bros. theme song with LEDs blinking to the iconic tunes. Although some would argue that this could be faked rather easily, the Maker has gone ahead and shared the code along with a couple other examples for any doubters–these include Van Halen’s “Eruption” and Mozart’s “Rondo Alla Turca.”

 

A "Draw it yourself" midi controller with a 3d-printed case

Friday, September 26th, 2014

dani-draw01

‘Draw It Yourself’ is a MIDI controller created by Dani Sanz which uses conductive ink as push-buttons. It is based on Arduino Uno and uses a capacitive sensor to determine whether the drawn buttons are being touched or not: (more…)

Real life Lego Rock Band powered by Arduino

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

legoband

We’d like to share the performance, by Opificio Sonico,  recorded live in July 2014 of  Toa Mata Band, best known as the “World’s first LEGO robotic band” and controlled by Arduino Uno which is hooked up to a MIDI sequencer: (more…)

DIY russian folk bot playing from EEG

Friday, June 6th, 2014

portable electro-acoustic orchestra

“Turbo-gusli” or “Gusli-samogudy” is a russian folk bot made by Moscow media-artist, musician and engineer of strange-sounding mechanisms – Dmitry Morozov. It’s basically a portable electro-acoustic orchestra inspired by “Gusli-samogudy”, a self-playing gusli, the oldest Russian multi-string plucked instrument, and very common in old russian fairy tales.

The system works in 3 different modes: when it plays algorithmically from Pure Data patch, when it’s controlled by Emotiv EPOC EEG interface and in MIDI mode (all of them using Pduino library and custom patch in Pure Data). (more…)

Delicate tumbles and robotic panels meet dance music with Arduino

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

tantra

Creative Applications featured Timo Maas video showing a custom MIDI-controlled machine built by a creative team  including Daito Manabe:

‘Tantra’ is the new single from Timo Maas, taken from his latest artist album, ‘Lifer’. The video for the single, created by Daito Manabe, Motoi Ishibashi, Muryo Homma and Youichi Sakamoto (rhizomatiks) includes a machine that uses Arduino controlled ball dispensers, motorised rotating steel plates and LED lights to create a nexus between electronic music and a sound responsive mechanical object.

 

A Physical Music Sequencer using RFID tags

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

A Physical Music Sequencer

Mike Cook prototyped  a diy physical music sequencer  with an Arduino Uno and we agree with him it has a “unique take on the concept an RFID sequencer”.

He wrote us describing it with these words:

This takes RFID tags each one mapped to a note and instrument and placed on one of 32 pegs will generate a music sequence. I designed and built a special RFID reader that has 32 read positions, it took 3 months to wire up. The case was hand built and it was designed to fit exactly into a flight box. It contains an Arduino and outputs MIDI.

It uses 32 red / blue LEDs to illuminate acrylic pegs which light up red when a token is hung on them. The sequence sweep progress is shown in blue on the pegs when the sweep position meets a peg with a token it light up purple and a note is produced. The sequence length can be adjusted from 8 steps to over a million steps before repeating.

(more…)

Build your own drum pad

Monday, September 17th, 2012

With the Drum kit – Kit AI by Spikenzielabs you can build an electronic drum kit. The bundle contains all of the electronics, including the piezo sensors for the drum pads. You build the drum pads yourself, and then connect the Drum Kit – Kit AI to your computer to play sounds using your favorite audio software, or use the MIDI-out port to a connected drum synthesizer.

Roberto De Nicolò (aka Rodenic) has realized an useful tutorial video showing what he has called FingerDrum. Roberto has applied a piezo sensor to each finger of a glove, allowing the triggering of individual drum sounds from his midi expander. If you think the glove is unconfortable, check out the FingerPad and turn your mouse pad into a drum pad.

 

 

 

Serenading with Arduino

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

This is for the uber-cool geeks who want to specially set up a pre-dinner concert for their loved ones.

Using an SRF05 and an Arduino Uno get that beautiful musical effect with the perfect smile!

Also get the code from Github, plug it in, load the sketch and play!

via [Michele] and [Larry]

Vibratron Robot Plays Out Midi As Steel Balls

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

As part of the National Robotics Week coverage of iheartrobotics, the Vibratron:

[...]the newest member of the RobOrchestra. This amazing musician was built by club members with a total budget of $1000. The Vibratron uses an Arduino Mega to control 30 individual solenoid gates which drop steel balls onto the vibration keys. Using the Arduino Mega they were able to avoid complications with multiplexing I/O lines. Notes are read in using a MIDI shield to receive standard MIDI signals from a sequencer or keyboard. The balls are recirculated using an Archimedes screw to raise them to the bucket at the top.

(more…)