Archive for the ‘Wearable Computing’ Category

Visual report of “Arduino meets wearables” workshop in Berlin

Friday, May 10th, 2013

arduino meets wearables

Yesterday we spent 8 hours learning and experimenting with Arduino Lilypad and 20 cool participants during our workshop, organized in collaboration with Kobakant! Here you can take a look at some pictures and below a  short video report made by Makerfaire Rome crew.

 

 

Are you working at a wearable project and you want to share it with us? Join us on Arduino Projects Flickr group, we are looking for nice projects to feature on this blog.

An interactive corset teaching you how to breathe

Saturday, April 27th, 2013

ruah

RUAH is an interactive corset powered by Arduino Lilypad and created by Giulia Tomasello for her BA graduation project. Its main aim is to help people into learning the importance and the benefits of a deep diaphragmatic breathing.

The circuit is composed by a sensor sewn on an elastic belt and an actuator placed inside the corset.
The stretch sensor catches the move of diaphragmatic breath and sends a feedback from Lilypad to muscle wire, a flexinol spring, inflating and deforming the centre of the structure.
Through this interaction between user and bustier, user becomes conscious about his body and his
breathe, increasing his sensory abilities and his physical endurance.
The slow controlled breathing, which balances body and mind, is acquired only after a long workout.
As the wearer feels it like a real second skin, RUAH transmits and receives emotional feedback, contrasting a continuous sense of stillness and movement, opposite feelings that surround us and join up to ecstasy.

ruah

ruah circuit

 

If you are interested in checking out the details of the project, you can explore Giulia’s pictures of the work in progress and her github code repository, after watching the video below with the Ruah in action!

 

 

Beat Feet: set your beats and effects with gestures using Arduino

Saturday, April 13th, 2013

 

bare feet

One of the teams participating to the MIT Media Labs Design Innovation workshop at PESIT Bangalore last January built something called  Beat Feet using Arduino Uno:

We designed a system which will allow musicians, guitarists and keyboardists to set the beats according to the music they play, without getting up from their place or even without lifting their hands off the instrument! Yes, simply by tapping foot at a constant rate. Don’t believe it?

Beat Feet allows musicians to add drum and guitar effects  using only feet gestures and wearable sensors. Check the details of the project on this website and watch the video below to see it in action!

Wearable soundscape from Canada

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

BioCircuit by Dana Ramler

 

I’m reblogging from Core77 this interesting wearable project because I’d like to highlight the using of Arduino Lilypad board:

Bio Circuit stems from our concern for ethical design and the creation of media-based interactions that reveal human interdependence with the environment. With each beat of the heart, Bio Circuit connects the wearer with the inner workings of their body.

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Wear Your Musical Interface

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Ruffletron is a prototype of a wearable musical interface and an experiment in performative interaction.

The project has been developed by a textile designer, Lara Grant, in collaboration with the sound engineer Cullen Miller.

 

For prototyping purpose, Lara used a LilyPad Arduino, Maxuino, Osculator and Ableton Live.

Project details here.

 

 

Wearable Fabric on the Arduino Store

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

We are happy to announce the first wearable kit on the Arduino Store . This kit has been made by Plug’n’Wear specifically for us. All fabrics in this kit are produced in Italy, and strongly related to a textile family business. If you want to get deeper into the story of this product have a look at Riccardo Marchesi presentation (still in Italian, soon to be traslated!) at World Wide Rome 2012.

Read over for Kit’s features

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Ref: Arduino based wearable pet

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

ref

Ref is a wearable pet made by Jens Dyvik. Its goal is to assist you in improving your emotional skills by mirroring your state of excitement through its behaviour. By sensing your heartbeat, Ref will respond through non-verbal communication. For example, if Ref detects that you are stressed, it will raise its head and tail, otherwise, when you get relaxed  Ref will curl up its tail and lower its head. The system is controlled by six servomotors and an Arduino.

via [Fashioningtech]

Summer School on wearable computing

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Next July a workshop on wearable computing will be held at Supsi Summer School (Ticino).

 

 

Goal of the workshop is the design and prototyping, through the Arduino platform, of objects that sense, interpret and react to the real world and that can be wearable and digitally fabricated.

More info here.

Via [openwear.org]

 

 

TicTocTrac: track your perception of time

Monday, May 14th, 2012

TicTocTrac Wristwatch

Brian Schiffer and Sima Mitra, from Cornell University, propose a very nice wristwatch that allows you to keep track of your time perception, using a method known as duration production: TicTocTrac.

Human perception of time is typically distorted, due to the different amount of information and experiences acquired everyday. TicTocTrac lets you to estimate your own perception, first by signaling the perceived duration of a given event and, then, by comparing it with the actual event duration. Finally, all the information can easily be saved to a micro SD card.

The hardware is based on a Atmega32u4, a DS3234S real-time clock and several leds to display time, while the software part is mostly based on Arduino’s DS3234S RTC library.

More information can be found here.

[Via: TicTocTrac]

High-tech blanket-cum-3D modelling tool

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

3D image input is often a challenging task when it comes to irregular objects like a human body. Here is where an arduino, tilt sensors and a little math comes to the rescue. University of Toronto’s Responsive Architecture at Daniels school created one such blanket.

The petals are made up of a conductive material, which are linked to larger network of conductive threads all in the shape of a hexagon. The loads of tilt sensors send the data of their position with respect to a central Arduino-powered computer which is then able to calculate the slopes between the various flowers and petals on the blanket. Thereby giving out a 3D input to the computer.

The concept will be widely applicable to interaction design, video game controls and numerous other fields.

Via:[Gizmodo, University of toronto - RAD]