Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

TicTocTrac: track your perception of time

Monday, May 14th, 2012

TicTocTrac Wristwatch

Brian Schiffer and Sima Mitra, from Cornell University, propose a very nice wristwatch that allows you to keep track of your time perception, using a method known as duration production: TicTocTrac.

Human perception of time is typically distorted, due to the different amount of information and experiences acquired everyday. TicTocTrac lets you to estimate your own perception, first by signaling the perceived duration of a given event and, then, by comparing it with the actual event duration. Finally, all the information can easily be saved to a micro SD card.

The hardware is based on a Atmega32u4, a DS3234S real-time clock and several leds to display time, while the software part is mostly based on Arduino’s DS3234S RTC library.

More information can be found here.

[Via: TicTocTrac]

Gardening + Arduino = Garduino!

Monday, May 7th, 2012

There are many available projects for the automated irrigation and lighting of plants using the Arduino board.

 

For those who were not already aware, here is the link to a tutorial by Instructables published a few days ago.

And here an old but useful article written by Luke Iseman on Make Volume 18.

The Botanicalls crew had created a leaf-shaped electronic board that allows transmission via Twitter of your plant conditions.

 

It ‘s time to seed!

 

Android app to control arduino

Monday, February 20th, 2012

This new android app in the the market enables you to communicate to your arduino using an WYSIWYG kind of interface using a bluetooth shield.

Features:

– discover and connect to Arduino board with Bluetooth shield
– display board firmware version, name and Firmata protocol version
– set pin mode (analog/digital input/output, pwm)
– get/set pin values
– LED and pin mode animation
– read messages from the board (Firmata String Sysex message)
– beautiful WYSIWYG interface with 320×480, 480×800, 480×854, 1024×600 and 1280×800(?) screens support
– no special sketches required (only slightly modified StandardFirmata sketch from Arduino IDE examples bundle)
– Free, no ads

The further details can be read here.

[Via: AndroidMarket and AnettoSoftware]

The arduino documentary

Monday, February 20th, 2012

The story of arduino from a concept to bringing a new genre to open source hardware revisited! A documentary directed by Rodrigo Calvo and Raul Alejos.

[Via: arduinothedocumentary.org]

Christmas lights E-mail notifier

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

So you are busy this Christmas day, and are one of those people who have been dragged away from their laptops.

Fear not, you’ll know the exact number of emails even while you are away from your laptop.

The guys over at Make have decided to guide you through the whole experience. In the example, they use an Arduino board hooked up to the internet using an ethernet connection, but there’s no reason it can’t work wirelessly – you just need the right board.

Its a simple-to-build exciting festive project!

Hooked up to the web, a bit of code on your mail server and the board itself allow the Ardunio to count your unread emails. If the number’s changed, it throws a signal to a power switch which controls the AC power connected to your lights.

Voila! When you get a new message, your Christmas lights let you know.

[Via: Gizmodo]

Blackberry Playbook and Arduino

Tuesday, December 6th, 2011

 

Adding just a few conditions in a small program, and using Arduino integrated with sensors, we get to add intelligence to a BlackBerry Playbook application.

The Arduino board uses an IR range sensor to find targets. The IR sensor is placed on a servo to scan the area of interest (e.g. kitchen). The data is sent to the BlackBerry PlayBook tablet, on which we’ve built an application to present a sonar map and look for movement. If movement is detected, the application will sound an alarm and take a picture.

Via: BlackBerry Developer’s blog.

Talk about hardware hacking!

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

Marcus with his hack

We all dream of a technology matching the Jetsons someday. And there came Siri, so close to a personal assistant to a gadget-lover. Here is Siri taken to the next level by Marcus Schappi, who dreams of using it to automate his home next.

An Australian man has become one of the first to hack the iPhone 4S voice recognition app Siri but his motives were not sinister – he wants to use the smartphone as a home automation tool.

He joins another Sydney developer and founder of Remember the Milk – a task manager app for the iPhone, iPad and Android platforms – in hacking Siri.

Mr Schappi says his hack could allow users to do simple tasks such as turn their air conditioning on or off, control their home entertainment or alarm system and unlock their front door or car.

But the hack may not last long, with Mr Schappi predicting Apple would want to close the hole he exploited.

To understand how the hack works one must know a bit about how Siri operates. It sends “voice packets” to Apple’s servers. The tech giant’s computer servers then provide voice recognition on these packets and returns a string of text.

To cap it all, it does not involve the jailbreaking of the iPhone!
Mr Schappi described the set-up as “relatively inexpensive”. It uses what is known as an Arduino board with an Ethernet port ($69.95), at least two Arduino compatible relay modules or electronic switches ($13.50 each) and one wireless mains remote ($24.95), bringing the total to $121.90.
Mr Schappi is the director of Little Bird Company, an electronics ’boutique’ as he puts it.
[Via: The Sydney Morning Herald]

Grooving with Open Hardware

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

A laser light show using open hardware is the perfect hack for a bachelor-pad.

It’s a “programmable disco ball,” a “cat toy for humans,” and a “personal laser light show,” all rolled into one. That’s how one Matt Leone describes his latest creation, aptly known as the Laser Ball. To realize his dream, Leone drilled a set of holes into a garden variety tennis ball, and inserted about 14 laser diodes, each with an attached strip of diffraction grating. Said diodes were then synced up with an Arduino-equipped Teensy microcontroller nestled within the ball, alongside a rechargeable battery.

To make it interactive, Leone incorporated Adafruit’s IR remote control.

Groove on!

[Via: Engadget ]

Breakfast at Arduino

Saturday, September 17th, 2011

 

For the second year in a row we decided to announce our new products at Maker Faire in NYC.

Tomorrow morning, if you come to the Arduino tent, you will be able to see:

Arduino 1.0, we finally froze the Arduino API, the IDE and the layout of the boards. We’ve made some minor additions to the Arduino connectors to make them more flexible. Tomorrow you will be able to download the release candidate and in 1 month of frantic testing with the community, the platform will be ready and stable.

Arduino Leonardo, a low cost Arduino board with the Atmega32u4. It has the same shape and connectors as the UNO but it has a simpler circuit. On the software side it has a nifty USB driver able to simulate a mouse , a keyboard, a serial port (with more drivers coming later). As usual for Arduino, everything will be released as open source (Core, Bootloader, Hardware).

Arduino Due, a major breakthrough for Arduino because we’re launching an Arduino board with a 32bit Cortex-M3 ARM processor on it. We’re using the SAM3U processor from ATMEL running at 96MHz with 256Kb of Flash, 50Kb of Sram, 5 SPI buses, 2 I2C interfaces, 5 UARTS, 16 Analog Inputs at 12Bit resolution and much more.

Instead of just releasing the finished platform we are opening the process to the community early on. We’re going to be demoing the board and giving away some boards to a selected group of developers who will be invited to shape the platform while it’s been created. After Maker Faire, we will begin selling a small batch of Developer Edition boards on the Arduino store (store.arduino,cc) for members of the community who want to be join the development effort. We plan a final and tested release by the end of 2011

Arduino Wifi Shield. It adds Wi-Fi communication capabilities to any Arduino. Instead of using any of the classic WiFi modules on the market we wanted to have something that will provide the maximum level of hackability to the user. The shield is based on a wifi micro module made by H&D Wireless coupled with a powerful AVR32 processor that carries the full TCP-IP stack leaving room to add your own protocols and customisations. We’ve also worked hard to make sure that you will be able to migrate your code from the Ethernet Shield with minor changes.

We’re also going to show some prototypes of new platforms we’ve been working on: We have robots, new IDEs and more.

It has been a crazy few months and we want to thank ATMEL very much the support that we got on all the new products.

Come over to Maker Faire and have a look for yourself!

Not Designed To Be Dumped

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

Arduino itself is something used to do things (or repair / reuse them). It’s very difficoult for you to break it, and it’s not the kind of consumer electronics product depicted in the video above (I must say me myself I’m treated like a kind of dump by my friends: people brings me all kind of electronic junk in order to be reused. I think this is common to most of our readers). But still I find this video strongly related to DIY world, our way to design things,  our personal daily habits. We strongly advice you to spend your next 7’46” in watchin this video.

(by the way,  long ago Arduino opted for Carbon Neutrality for the majority of its products).

via [HistoryOfElectronics]

 

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