Archive for the ‘Open Source’ Category

Arduino IDE 1.6.1 released and available for download

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

IDE1.6.1-03-03

A new version of the Arduino IDE (1.6.1) is available at the download page!
A month ago we released the version 1.6.0 of the Arduino IDE. We then received lots of feedback: issues on Github, emails on the developers mailing list and, most important, forum messages. We fixed a lot of issues, here is a brief list:

  • Better Yún discovery mechanism (thanks Ron Guest)
  • Better SoftwareSerial library (thanks Matthijs Kooijman)
  • Native dialogs on MacOSX on the Java 7+ experimental version
  • Improved library name matching, so IRemote library won’t conflict with RobotIRremote library (thanks Paul Stoffregen)
  • Fixed bug on Windows when attempting to open a sketch by double clicking it

As usual, the complete list of fixes and credits is available here.

Don’t forget to report any issue you find, either on Github or on the Arduino forum: your help is very much appreciated. It doesn’t matter if you are not a tech specialist: every feedback adds value.

We are already working on release 1.6.2, with some very useful features and user experience improvements. Stay tuned!

Handy Arduino makes it on french television

Monday, December 15th, 2014

arte-docum

Last saturday, Arte tvl aired a short documentary in french language about Arduino. The video was created by FUTURE magazine and featuring Massimo Banzi, David Cuartielles and Arduino users: children and young electronics enthusiasts:

Tinkering in a garage on a drone, playing with a set of lights with LEDs or even build a robotic arm worthy of a science fiction movie … Today, even when one is a novice in electronics all this is possible through Arduino, a real flexible technology.

(more…)

From Open Making to Open Manufacturing at Open Hardware Summit in Rome

Monday, August 25th, 2014

openhardwaresummit14

The fifth edition of the Open Hardware Summit, for the first time happening outside the USA, is taking place on the 30th of September 2014  in Rome (you can now book your free tickets here).The event launches the Rome Innovation Week, culminating with the second edition of Maker Faire Rome (3-5 October).  (more…)

MakerFaire european edition and Open Hardware Summit next October in Rome!

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

makerfaire rome 2014

Come and join the biggest European gathering of Makers, full of amazing people who enjoy learning and love sharing projects and inventions from the 3rd to the 5th of October in Rome.

If you have an awesome project and want to show off to an international community, remember that the Call for Makers will be open until the 25th of May. Click here to submit your project.

There are a number of different types of maker applications you can do. You can apply as: (more…)

Arduino Donations 2014: we are open to suggestions!

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

donations2014

Once again this year Arduino will make a donation ( for a total of 30,000 USD) to promote open source culture and innovation.
This year, Arduino is also soliciting suggestions: througout 2014, we are asking our community to highlight the 10 organizations which would best benefit from Arduino support.

Arduino is based on the contribution of many other open source projects and wants to support these and other initiatives sharing our approach and philosophy, through yearly donations.
We thought it could be a great idea to involve the community for selecting the projects to support by suggesting us how they could benefit from Arduino donations.

The Arduino community is invited to suggest beneficiaries – associations, foundations, institutions – according to one or more of the following cornerstones:
– it brings innovations in the open electronic and making ecosystem
– it’s an open source project
– it facilitates the exchange of knowledge
– it has an impact on open source ecosystem
– it is a non commercial project

The first call is open during May: anyone can fill this form to send a suggestion based on the cornerstones explained above by the 30th of May. At the end of June we’ll announce 5 finalists receiving a donation of $2000 each.

The second call for submissions will happen during September.
At Maker Faire Rome in October 2014, Arduino will announce the remaining 5 finalists receiving a donation of $2000 each.

The final selection will be at the discretion of the Arduino team.

Moreover, Arduino founders have already chosen their beneficiaries: Creative Commons, Free Software Foundation and Processing.

 

Concrete Batch Plant using Arduino and LIFA in Bangladesh

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013

concrete plant

Arduino user Geotechbd wrote us from Bangladesh to share his experience:

Our company here in Bangladesh owns a quite old concrete batch plant, which had full manual control requiring an operator to control 14+ switched and observe 3 mechanical scales (dial gauges). I was successful to upgrade this plant to an automated unit requiring minimal operator input using custom made Arduino Uno compatible board and LIFA. Wiring is still messy which I shall take care in the near future. (more…)

Open source matters in hardware, too – Interview

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

Arduino TRE

(Article originally published on Ars Technica)

Jon Brodkin of Ars Technica conducts a Q&A with Massimo Banzi as Arduino’s rise continues.

Most of the technology world is familiar with open source software and the reasons why, in some eyes, it’s more appealing than proprietary software. When software’s source code is available for anyone to inspect, it can be examined for security flaws, altered to suit user wishes, or used as the basis for a new product.

Less well-known is the concept behind open source hardware, such as Arduino. Massimo Banzi, co-creator of Arduino, spoke with Ars this month about the importance of open hardware and a variety of other topics related to Arduino. As an “open source electronic prototyping platform,” Arduino releases all of its hardware design files under a Creative Commons license, and the software needed to run Arduino systems is released under an open source software license. That includes an Arduino development environment that helps users create robots or any other sort of electronics project they can dream up.

So just like with open source software, people can and do make derivatives of Arduino boards or entirely new products powered by Arduino technology.

Why is openness important in hardware? “Because open hardware platforms become the platform where people start to develop their own products,” Banzi told Ars. “For us, it’s important that people can prototype on the BeagleBone [a similar product] or the Arduino, and if they decide to make a product out of it, they can go and buy the processors and use our design as a starting point and make their own product out of it.”

(more…)

A Baby Monitor goes open source: interview to the team

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

Open source Baby Monitor

Last August, a team composed by researchers coming from  Research Center E. Piaggio of University of Pisa and FabLab Pisa, went to Nairobi to work at the Summer School developing an Open Source Baby Monitor for OS4BME (Open Source for Biomedical Engineering). Arduino supported the project with some hardware and following their adventure in Africa.

Arti Ahluwalia (Professor of Bioengineering), Daniele Mazzei and Carmelo De Maria (Biomedical Engineers, co-founders of FabLab Pisa and researchers at the Center) are now back in Italy and I interviewed them as this project raised interest from the open source community. (more…)

Fueling the Hardware Revolution with Tindie

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Tindie

Some people call it the “Etsy for hardware”, some other “the indie marketplace for open source hardware”, even if being open is not a requirement. Tindie’s mission consists of connecting the world’s small, hardware businesses with customers all over the world and today starts a cool initiative called Open Designs and Kickbacks. When sellers create a new product, they will be able to select a project the product is a derivative from, and enter the % of sales that will go to the open hardware project.

“Businesses can manufacture the open design as is, or create products derived from it. Those sellers can then kickback a portion of their sales back to the designer. Tindie will handle the disbursement of funds so it’s absolutely painless. For designers, there are no fees, no hosting costs, just a simple way to reap the benefits of their hard work”

(more…)

Take the 2013 Open Source Hardware Community Survey.

Monday, July 29th, 2013

Catarina Mota and I put together an updated version of the annual Open Source Hardware Community Survey for the Open-Source Hardware Association (OSHWA). Here’s a summary:

Our goal is to arrive at a better understanding of who we are as a community, why and how we use/make open-source hardware, and how our practices and numbers are changing over time. For this purpose, we are asking all those who use and/or develop open-source hardware to please respond. The aggregate results will be made publicly available after the survey closes. By publishing your responses, we hope to provide the public with insights into the practices and experiences of the people involved in open-source hardware.

Please help us understand the open-source hardware community by taking the survey.

You can also check out last year’s results.

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