Archive for the ‘music’ Category

A "Draw it yourself" midi controller with a 3d-printed case

Friday, September 26th, 2014

dani-draw01

‘Draw It Yourself’ is a MIDI controller created by Dani Sanz which uses conductive ink as push-buttons. It is based on Arduino Uno and uses a capacitive sensor to determine whether the drawn buttons are being touched or not: (more…)

DIY russian folk bot playing from EEG

Friday, June 6th, 2014

portable electro-acoustic orchestra

“Turbo-gusli” or “Gusli-samogudy” is a russian folk bot made by Moscow media-artist, musician and engineer of strange-sounding mechanisms – Dmitry Morozov. It’s basically a portable electro-acoustic orchestra inspired by “Gusli-samogudy”, a self-playing gusli, the oldest Russian multi-string plucked instrument, and very common in old russian fairy tales.

The system works in 3 different modes: when it plays algorithmically from Pure Data patch, when it’s controlled by Emotiv EPOC EEG interface and in MIDI mode (all of them using Pduino library and custom patch in Pure Data). (more…)

Sugarcube, a grid based music controller with accelerometer

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

sugarcube

 

Once again Amanda Ghassaei sent a cool project she’s been working on lately as an extension of the work she’s been doing on the monome project. Sugarcube is an open source, grid-based, standalone MIDI instrument  self-contained and relatively cheap to make. It communicates via a MIDI output with other electronic MIDI instruments and software environments like Ableton and MaxMSP.

An Arduino Uno generates all of its MIDI data and drives LEDS, buttons, a 2 axis gyroscope, a 3 axis accelerometer,  two potentiometers, and the whole device is powered by a lithium-polymer battery making it pretty portable.

She published detailed  documentation on Instructables to make one yourself   and shared a bunch of videos to discover its main features: (more…)

Delicate tumbles and robotic panels meet dance music with Arduino

Thursday, January 9th, 2014

tantra

Creative Applications featured Timo Maas video showing a custom MIDI-controlled machine built by a creative team  including Daito Manabe:

‘Tantra’ is the new single from Timo Maas, taken from his latest artist album, ‘Lifer’. The video for the single, created by Daito Manabe, Motoi Ishibashi, Muryo Homma and Youichi Sakamoto (rhizomatiks) includes a machine that uses Arduino controlled ball dispensers, motorised rotating steel plates and LED lights to create a nexus between electronic music and a sound responsive mechanical object.

 

It’s Not Over Until the Fat Lady Sings. BareConductive have a stretch goal!

Sunday, November 17th, 2013

TouchBoard

The Touch Board by Bare Conductive is not only a way to turn almost any surface into an interface, it is also one of the first products taking part of Arduino at Heart program: it will bear the Arduino at Heart logo, and you can program it just like an Arduino.

It took less that 1 day to reach the first goal of £15K on Kickstarter and since then they are working on building interesting stretch goal!

Some hours ago they reached the second stretch goal of £75K and they’ll be sending to every backer a stencil perfect for use with Electric Paint.

The stencil will include the Touch Board footprint so you can easily connect your Touch Board to the graphic. It will also have a keyboard template to make a MIDI piano and some other designs to help you get started the second you receive your Touch Board.

(more…)

It's Not Over Until the Fat Lady Sings. BareConductive have a stretch goal!

Sunday, November 17th, 2013

TouchBoard

The Touch Board by Bare Conductive is not only a way to turn almost any surface into an interface, it is also one of the first products taking part of Arduino at Heart program: it will bear the Arduino at Heart logo, and you can program it just like an Arduino.

It took less that 1 day to reach the first goal of £15K on Kickstarter and since then they are working on building interesting stretch goal!

Some hours ago they reached the second stretch goal of £75K and they’ll be sending to every backer a stencil perfect for use with Electric Paint.

The stencil will include the Touch Board footprint so you can easily connect your Touch Board to the graphic. It will also have a keyboard template to make a MIDI piano and some other designs to help you get started the second you receive your Touch Board.

(more…)

Carpentry, circuit design and coding for an interactive instrument

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

field lines

Field Lines is an interactive instrument designed by composer Charles Peck as part of his Threshold of Beauty project. On his website, Charles says that the installation is his largest piece to date:

Constructing this substantial piece of equipment drew on a number of disciplines including physical design, carpentry (an occasional hobby of mine), circuit design, and coding. As alluded in the title, this piece focuses on the magnetic field. There are three sections of magnetic material, including magnetic sand, a compass array, and zinc-plated iron. Audiences are able to manipulate these materials with a magnet in the space below each case while infrared sensors pick up their movement. The sensors send that information to an Arduino board, which then creates unique music for each section.

(more…)

A diy pop-up interactive book made with recycled materials

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

Electronic book

Inspired by the work of Munari, Montessori and her mum, Antonella Nonnis followed her personal interest in building tangible interactions and working children in general and recently  built an unusual diy pop-up book.

The Music, Math, Art and Science Electronic Book contains 4 pages that treat those subjects using movable parts and use a pull tab, a button and the electrical capacitance of the human body to activate sounds and lights:

The pages have been done using recycled materials that I collected during these years in London (paper, fabrics, LEDs, resistors, wires, foil paper, glue, cardboards) and it’s powered by two Arduino Diecimila, one that controls the paper Pop-up Piano and the other is for controlling the Arts and Science Page, while the Math page runs autonomously with 2 3V cell batteries. The two Arduino run with two 9V batteries although they are more stable if they run with the USB through the computer.

(more…)

A Physical Music Sequencer using RFID tags

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

A Physical Music Sequencer

Mike Cook prototyped  a diy physical music sequencer  with an Arduino Uno and we agree with him it has a “unique take on the concept an RFID sequencer”.

He wrote us describing it with these words:

This takes RFID tags each one mapped to a note and instrument and placed on one of 32 pegs will generate a music sequence. I designed and built a special RFID reader that has 32 read positions, it took 3 months to wire up. The case was hand built and it was designed to fit exactly into a flight box. It contains an Arduino and outputs MIDI.

It uses 32 red / blue LEDs to illuminate acrylic pegs which light up red when a token is hung on them. The sequence sweep progress is shown in blue on the pegs when the sweep position meets a peg with a token it light up purple and a note is produced. The sequence length can be adjusted from 8 steps to over a million steps before repeating.

(more…)

Turning drawings into a music game

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

musicink

Gilda Negrini and Riccardo Vendramin, two young product designers from Italy, wrote us to share their last work, designed during a course called Autoproduzioni at Politecnico of  Milano. It’s called MusicInk, it runs on an Arduino Duemilanove board, and  gives an alternative method to teach music to children. That’s how they describe it:

MusicInk makes drawings turning into real music, this magical process is due to a mashup of various eterogenous technologies: Conductive Ink  by Bare Conductive, MPR121 controller, Arduino (Duemilanove board), LiPo shield (removed on a second time), Bluetooth shield by Seedstudio, Android platform, Pure Data for Android (libido), Pure Data patch.
Our project was developed with the help of our friend Manh Luong Bui and has been a very hard work.
We started our project studying the possibilities to create new and cheap musical instruments, then we discovered studies about conductive ink and we decided to create something different with these two technologies.

Here you can see their experience in testing MusicInk in a kindergarten in Milano with children between 4 and 5 years old: