Archive for the ‘Galileo’ Category

Real-time tinkering on Intel Galileo using a mobile device

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

connectanything

If you are a beginner and want to start prototyping easily with  Intel Galileo, it could be fun to use ConnectAnyThing. It  makes it easy for novices to start tinkering in hardware before jumping into example code and the IDE but it’s also useful for experienced builders that want to try something out really quickly.

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Make your lasercut datamonster with Intel Galileo

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

datamonster

Datamonsters are creatures that respond to you. They can see you and respond to your presence and movement. In addition to responding to immediate interactions, they can also be influenced by events happening in the world outside.

 

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Muzzley and Intel Galileo LED strip demo

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

muzzley

Muzzley provides libraries for the most popular languages and platforms and in this project allows you to control a led strip with a mobile device (iOS and Android) using an Intel Galileo Board: (more…)

WebsocketClient for Intel Galileo + Spacebrew

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

 

intel galileo

The SmartUp Team submitted on Intel Community a project developed in their new digital fabrication laboratory, tinkering with  Intel Galileo boards and Spacebrew.

Spacebrew  is “an open, dynamically re-routable software toolkit for choreographing interactive spaces”, basically a way to connect smart objects of any kind using the WebSocket protocol.

Basically, they modified the Arduino WebsocketClient library to use it with Intel Galileo and specifically with Spacebrew:

The received situation was of a version of the Arduino WebsocketClient library: https://github.com/labatrockwell/ArduinoWebsocketClient (oriented to Spacebrew) adapted from: https://github.com/krohling/ArduinoWebsocketClient (implementing the online websocket protocol) neither of them supporting Galileo, an Intel SoC Pentium-based board. It has been revised, modified, and integrated, so that this version runs on Galileo and works for both the connection to a server such as echo.websocket.org and Spacebrew. This version includes extended tracing facilities for debugging (see WebSocketClient.h). The main changes with respect to the previous versions are marked by slash-slash-star-slash-slash.

You can explore the library on Github.

Creating a moisture sensor system using nails and Intel Galileo (now in the Arduino Store!)

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

soil sensor

Manoel Ramon was at Maker Faire Rome last October and created a cool project, in a couple of hours, based on Intel Galileo.

As many of you already know Intel Galileo board is the first product in a new family of Arduino Certified boards featuring Intel architecture. Starting today is also available for purchase in the Arduino Store! (more…)

Open source matters in hardware, too – Interview

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

Arduino TRE

(Article originally published on Ars Technica)

Jon Brodkin of Ars Technica conducts a Q&A with Massimo Banzi as Arduino’s rise continues.

Most of the technology world is familiar with open source software and the reasons why, in some eyes, it’s more appealing than proprietary software. When software’s source code is available for anyone to inspect, it can be examined for security flaws, altered to suit user wishes, or used as the basis for a new product.

Less well-known is the concept behind open source hardware, such as Arduino. Massimo Banzi, co-creator of Arduino, spoke with Ars this month about the importance of open hardware and a variety of other topics related to Arduino. As an “open source electronic prototyping platform,” Arduino releases all of its hardware design files under a Creative Commons license, and the software needed to run Arduino systems is released under an open source software license. That includes an Arduino development environment that helps users create robots or any other sort of electronics project they can dream up.

So just like with open source software, people can and do make derivatives of Arduino boards or entirely new products powered by Arduino technology.

Why is openness important in hardware? “Because open hardware platforms become the platform where people start to develop their own products,” Banzi told Ars. “For us, it’s important that people can prototype on the BeagleBone [a similar product] or the Arduino, and if they decide to make a product out of it, they can go and buy the processors and use our design as a starting point and make their own product out of it.”

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Massimo Banzi reveals an exciting new product and collaboration with Intel

Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

Makerfaire Banzi

Today  Massimo Banzi together with Intel CEO Brian Krzanich during Maker Faire Rome opening conference announced a new product and collaboration: it’s called Intel Galileo.

 intel galileo

Intel® Galileo

 Intel Galileo board is the first product in a new family of Arduino Certified boards featuring Intel architecture. The platform is easy to use for beginners and for those looking to take designs to the next level.

Galileo is a microcontroller board based on the Intel® Quark SoC X1000 Application Processor, a 32-bit Intel Pentium-class system on a chip.

Overall, the Intel Galileo development board is a great tool for quickly prototyping simple interactive designs like LED light displays that respond to social media, or for tackling more complex projects from automating home appliances to building life-size robots that you control from your smartphone.

intel galileo box

Building on the Galileo development board, Intel and the Arduino community will work closely together on future products that bring the performance, scalability and possibilities of Intel technology to this growing community of makers. (more…)