Archive for the ‘lcd’ Category

Introducing the Arduino TFT LCD screen

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

LCD_blog

 

In conjunction with the release of the new version of the Arduino IDE and the Arduino Robot, we’re also putting out a TCT LCD screen. The screen was developed in conjunction with Complubot and the library relies on the Adafruit GFX and ST7735 libraries.

The screen lets you do all sorts of fun things, like play games or lose the serial monitor to see the values from sensors.

The Arduino specific library, named TFT, extends the Adafruit libraries to support  more Processing-like methods. You can write text, draw shapes, and show bitmap images on the screen in a way that should be familiar to users of Processing.

The screen works well with all types of Arduinos with a little bit of wiring, and fits perfectly in the Esplora and Robot sockets. In addition to all this other goodness, there’s a SD card slot on the back for storing pictures and other data.

If you want to learn more about the screen and what it’s capable of, check out the TFT library page, getting started guide, and product page.

You can buy the TFT screen from the Arduino store now!

If you have something cool you’ve made with this, let us know!

A simple Arduino-based tachometer

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

 

Chris, from PyroElectro.com, proposes a comprehensive tutorial on how to make a simple, yet effective, Arduino-based tachometer.
The circuit is very simple: an IR led is coupled with an IR phototransistor to detect possible interruptions of the light beam, while the Arduino is responsible to calculate the time interval between two such events. Finally, a LCD is used to display the current RPM to the user.
To validate his project, a typical computer fan has been used in the set-up and the outcomes have demonstrated to be very close to the true RPM value (2600 +/- 100 RPMs).
The bill of materials, as well as the schematic, the source code and a detailed tutorial on how to build the circuit is available here.

[Via: PyroElectro.com]

 

Time-based OTP with Arduino

Monday, July 16th, 2012

First prototype

One-time-password (OTP) and its time-based version (time-based OTP, or simply TOTP) are commodity solutions to provide a second factor, in addition to simple passwords, for authentication.

Here Jose Damico proposes his way to implement a simple TOTP device using only open-source tools. The core of the project is an Arduino board connected to a small LCD. From the software perspective, the SHA-1 library comes from Cryptosuite, a cryptographic library for Arduino.

The device, which is OATH-compliant, will be presented soon to the “13th Fórum Internacional Software Livre“, that will be held in Porto Alegre, Brazil, in next July 25-28.

More information can be found here.

[Via: Hack A Day]

MiniCom: an LCD-equipped remote shutter

Monday, June 4th, 2012

Pixel_k needed a simple remote shutter for his digital reflex camera, which had to be usable even in low-light situations, so he decided to build his own controller by exploiting an Arduino Pro Mini and a small LCD. The result is “MiniCom”:

The interface is limited to a single rotary knob you can push to validate your choices. It remains easy and intuitive to use even when it’s minus 20°C and it’s pitch black.
The output is a standard 3.5mm stereo jack, you can use different cables to control different brand of DSLRs.

Source code and a detailed description of the project can be found here.

[Via: Hack A Day and Knackes News]

DIY custom rugged Arduino

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

In this instructable, Dustin Andrews shows how to make a custom Arduino board, equipped with a lcd, a buzzer and a solid enclosure. Dustin’s goal has been to design a rugged Arduino version, that can be employed “as is” in many practical project, in place of a less solid breadboard-based solution.

The project is released under Creative Commons CC-BY license.

[Via: Instructables]

Arduino, GPS and Display i2C…

Friday, May 25th, 2012

 

En este nuevo tutorial Arduino by ARDUTEKA, estudiamos a fondo los módulos GPS, en concreto los módulos diseñados por LIBELIUM, para aprender a extraer y comprender todas las tramadas de datos que recibimos de los GPS y posteriormente, tratar esa información para mostrar en un display con bus i2C datos como la latitud, longitud, altura y hora UTC…

 

 

[Via: Arduteka]

 

 

DIY Amp Hour Meter

Thursday, May 17th, 2012

Ever wanted to see how much electricity your next project is consuming? Look no further; this Instructable will guide you about how you can, too, make a device to monitor the same.

This project was developed by Steve Spence of Arduinotronics with input from forum members at the Yahoo Group - Arduino Home and The Arduino Forum.

Steve writes:

“There’s a couple of commercial products that can do this, but not with the flexibility I wanted. I designed an Arduino micro-controller based solution that is very extensible. Right now it monitors the above values of attached gear, and I’m thinking about adding web monitoring and an SD Card for data collection.”

Inexpensive 6-channels temperature scanner

Friday, May 11th, 2012

Arduino powered temperature scanner with LCD screen display

Did you ever look for a cheap temperature monitor capable of collecting up to six sensor readings?

Johnathan Hottell needed to monitor the engine temperature of his LB7 Duramax diesel truck to avoid over-heating problems in hot days. Looking for commercial products, he found several quite expensive scanners (around hundreds of dollars), so he decided to build its own monitor using an Arduino Pro Mini, six NTC thermistors and a Nokia 3310 LCD screen to display the temperature readings.

The result, which is described here in great details, cost around 40 $.

Via: DangerousPrototypes

Control An LCD with a 595 Shift Register

Monday, January 16th, 2012

[Carlo Denaro] is sharing a smart solution to save digital pins while controlling an LCD, using Shift Register 74HC595. A simple yet useful project with skecth&libraries, datasheets and Fritzing schematics.

via [grayhats.org]

When music meets Arduino

Monday, August 29th, 2011

A beautiful project by [Leigh Davis]. It is a brilliant proof of how Arduino fits into virtually any sphere of thought and is the shortest path for a creator realizing his idea in reality.

He writes:

I began the first few days by developing a stand alone application build in MaxMSP that understands the notes that a play on my (recently purchased second-hand) flute. I set the range from low C right up to the 3rd octave D. Each note of the chromatic scale triggers a bang, which is coloured uniquely to the other notes bang messages.

The bang message then sets the corresponding color to the display screen on the application. Which will in turn send a signal to the arduino to dispense the corresponding oil color on water according to the different notes. (Something like a physical Milkdrop!)He further plans to control different LEDs, motors and the likes using the Rayne application.