Arduino Day 2017: Thank You!

Arduino Team April 6, 2017

On April 1st, Arduino Day was celebrated by more than 499 communities in 79 different countries, with official events held in Turin, Malmo and San Jose.

In Turin (photos can be found here), Massimo Banzi and Federico Musto unveiled the latest developments of the Arduino platform, including products like the MKRFOX1200, NFC Shield, LoRA Gateway Shield, LoRA Node Shield, as well as the Casetta and Libretto Kits. Moreover, they also highlighted new improvements to Arduino Create, particularly its expansion to Chromebook users, and recent advancements of Arduino’s educational project, CTC.  

Weren’t able to tune in to our live stream? Watch the video below to catch all of the day’s talks by various members of the Arduino team.

Most importantly, we would like to express a heartfelt thanks to our extremely passionate and awesome community. It was YOU who made Arduino Day a huge and successful celebration we will never forget.

 

ArduECU is a waterproof and rugged Arduino electronic control unit

Arduino Team April 5, 2017

Now on Kickstarter, ArduECU is an IP69K-rated waterproof, rugged and impact-resistant electronic control unit (ECU) that enables your Arduino projects to withstand the elements and other harsh environments.

ArduECU is compatible with all 12V to 24V systems, and can be used in a wide range of applications such as vehicle diagnostics and control, stationary machines, remote monitoring, industrial automation, and agriculture to name just a few.

Based on an ATmega328, the ECU can be programmed with the Arduino IDE and also supports CoDeSys, meaning you can now configure your ArduECU with ladder logic, functional block, structured text, instruction list, or sequential function charts.

Read the rest of this entry »

Geared clock measures time linearly

Arduino Team April 4, 2017

Jonathan Odom, a full-time designer at Instructables who goes by the name “JON-A-TRON,” decided to make a clock illustrating time’s linearity.  What he came up with was a beautifully crafted (robotically manufactured at the Pier 9 workshop, that is) clock that uses two rack and pinion assemblies to move a line of numbers for hours on top of another line signifying minutes.

The minute “hand” is divided up into five-minute intervals, which seems to him to feel less neurotic than being precise down to the exact minute. Magnifying glasses are used to magnify an hour and minute number, reminding onlookers to focus on the present.

The clock is actuated using an Arduino Uno with a motor driver, controlling a stepper motor for each “hand.” It’s an incredible build, and nicely illustrated. Whether or not you have access to the tools needed to recreate this exact clock, perhaps this concept will inspire something similar! Read the rest of this entry »

Build a smartphone-controlled scoreboard with Arduino

Arduino Team April 3, 2017

Using the Arduino 101’s built-in Bluetooth capability, Bob from the I Like to Make Stuff YouTube channel has crafted a beautiful, smartphone-controlled scoreboard.

If you’re into competitive sports, or perhaps want to settle who takes the trash out the most once and for all, an RGB scoreboard is a great solution. Perhaps it’s overkill in some cases, but Bob’s creation, which he expertly makes in the video here out of MDF looks amazing, and is large enough to be seen from a distance. It’s also small enough to be nominally portable.

His setup employs an RGB LED unit for each of the pixels that make up the score display, and uses an Arduino 101 as the brains of the device. Control is accomplished via a mobile app. Read the rest of this entry »

Arduino at Salone del Mobile: Come and visit us in Milan!

Arduino Team March 31, 2017

 

The annual Salone del Mobile–which will be taking place in Milan from April 4th-9th–is a world-renowned, weeklong furniture design event with 2,500 exhibitors and 300,000-plus visitors from 160 countries.

Over the years, Arduino has become a common tool amongst interactive designers looking to bring their installations to life, and Salone del Mobile is a great place to witness these various applications of the board firsthand. After browsing the show floor, don’t forget to visit our booth inside Pavilion 22, Stand G26, Workspace 3.0!

There, attendees will have a chance to play games, participate in giveaways, and learn more about our latest products. Moreover, be sure to get a glimpse of the great “Bridge” project from the Accademia di Architettura of Mendrisio, Switzerland–a fantastic demonstration of how Arduino can be used in architecture.

We look forward to seeing! Until then, more information can be found here!

Particle Flow makes granules tumble in interesting patterns

Arduino Team March 31, 2017

This Arduino-based project creates interesting tumbling patterns using a system that tilts a plane in a controlled manner while deforming its surface.

NEOANALOG, a “studio for hybrid things and spaces,” was commissioned to build the Particle Flow installation, which explores how granules tumble under the control of gravity. This mechanism takes the form of a large hexagon held in three corners by linkages pushed up and down by NEMA 24 stepper motors. As these rods are lifted, the granules inside the “arena” are steered over to the opposite side producing a zen-like experience.

Inside the main hexagon are 19 smaller hexagons, each controlled by servos to lift an individual section of the rolling surface up and down. Control of the entire system is accomplished via a PC running Processing, which sends commands via Ethernet to an Arduino Mega and the steppers to an Arduino Uno with three motor drivers.  Read the rest of this entry »

Rotate your laptop with this movement tracking system

Arduino Team March 29, 2017

YouTuber “SlightlyCyberneticVlogs” wanted a modular method to rotate his robot heads that he has built and plans to build in the future. What he came up with was a system that uses OpenCV running on a laptop or other computing device, which interfaces with an Arduino to make it follow him around the room.

For those of use that don’t have immediate plans to create a robot head, the neck swivel is also quite useful for pointing your computer’s webcam at you, or whatever else is moving around in a room, while filming. Perhaps it, or a close variation, could even be used to adjust a TV or computer monitor to a correct viewing angle. Read the rest of this entry »

Arduino Day Turin, Malmö and San Jose: Schedule of Events

Arduino Team March 29, 2017

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As Arduino Day quickly approaches, we are blown away by the tremendous support of the Arduino community with more than 480 events from all around the world.

Arduino Day Turin will feature talks by Massimo Banzi, Federico Musto, and other Arduino members, which will be streamed live on the Arduino Facebook, Twitter and YouTube channels. The streaming will begin at 3pm CET. A final program of presentations will be posted as soon as possible at this linkStarting at 11am CET at Toolbox Turin, the agenda will include: two workshops for children in collaboration with Fablab for Kids (registration here and here), a basic and an advanced workshop for adults in coordination with the Casa Jasmina crew (registration here and here), as well as a young Maker activity corner supported by Codemotion Kids. Everything will be free of charge.

Arduino Day Malmö festivities (full program here) will consist of an Arduino project showcase, a panel of discussions with David Cuartielles and local Makers, in addition to a pair of free activities for kids (registration is not necessary). Starting at 5pm, there will also be a live streaming of the talks from Arduino Day Turin.

Last but not least, the Arduino team will be hosting a third official event in San Jose, CA (register here). The program will kick off with a demonstration of Arduino projects, followed by a live video exchange with Arduino Day Toronto. This is a great opportunity for Arduino enthusiasts in America to socialize with one another, exhibit their latest creations, and even learn more about Arduino in the classroom. Everyone is welcome to attend!

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We cannot wait to celebrate with our community this Saturday! Until then, continue sharing your plans and inviting your friends to join Arduino Day via social media using the hashtag #ArduinoD17.

Arduino-controlled 360° camera trap for animal photography

Arduino Team March 28, 2017

Using an Arduino, wildlife observer and hiking hacker Andrew Quitmeyer modified a spherical camera to take pictures when motion is detected.

If you’d like to photograph wildlife without actually being there to scare the animals off (or because you would eventually get bored), a great solution is a camera trap. These devices can trigger a camera when animals move nearby, hopefully capturing interesting images. Generally, you need to point your camera in the right direction, but Quitmeyer got around this by using a 360 camera instead to eliminate this placement bias. Read the rest of this entry »

Testing microswitches with a (not quite) Useless Machine

Arduino Team March 27, 2017

Pete “Raster” Prodoehl shows how to test microswitches with an Arduino Uno.

As referenced in his write-up, Prodoehl needed a way to test microswitches that he’d be using for an exhibit. After all, when something is on display, the last thing you want is to have to replace components. Inspired by how Consumer Reports tests things, he decided to build his own setup with a counter and 3D-printed “pusher.”

What he found was that when you’re testing the life span of a component made to work over and over, your testing components have to also be robust enough to handle the very gradual abuse. It’s an interesting exercise, and something that engineers in manufacturing have to deal with constantly. Getting something to work once or even a times is neat, but getting it to function thousands of times for a test or otherwise takes a different way of thinking! Read the rest of this entry »