Monome + Raspberry Pi + Arduino + Python Step Sequencer

Arduino Team August 17, 2016

Created by “modulogeek,” the Monomepi Step Sequencer is a step sequencer that uses a Monome as an input controller and a toy glockenspiel as the output instrument.

The brain of the device is a Raspberry Pi 3, which runs a step sequencer program written in Python. Both the Monome interface and an Arduino Uno are connected to the Pi via USB. The Arduino controls eight servos, each attached to a “mallet” made of LEGO bricks taped onto coffee sticks. Read the rest of this entry »

Create a simple lie detector using Arduino

Arduino Team August 16, 2016

Have you ever found yourself in an argument with a friend and wanted to know once and for all if they were telling the truth? Lucky for you, 17-year-old Dante Roumega has created a simple lie detector using an Arduino.

This system works by measuring an individual’s galvanic skin response, which is a fancy way of saying their conductivity. The basis for the project is that our skin changes its conductivity depending on how we feel, particularly following an evocative question.

Roumega connects an Arduino housed inside a small cardboard box to person being interrogated and to a computer running graphing software, which allows him to monitor the results in real-time. There are also three LEDs that enable him to tell if someone’s lying without looking at the screen. He starts by asking his subjects some easy things that they’d answer truthfully, like “what’s your name” or “where do you live,” followed by some that would likely prompt a false answer to get a baseline.

Read the rest of this entry »

HardWino is an open-source, Arduino-based cocktail maker

Arduino Team August 15, 2016

While it may not be the first (nor will it be the last) robotic bartender we’ve seen, Pierre Charlier has come up with a clever and affordable way to mix the perfect drink at home. Say hello to HardWino.

The automatic cocktail maker consists of a six-slot, rotating beverage holder that is controlled by an Arduino Mega and uses a TFT screen to accept orders. The project also includes stepper motors and L298 driver boards, which are supported by 3D-printed parts. Power is supplied through a 12V DC jack. Read the rest of this entry »

Build an electric go-kart on a budget with Arduino

Arduino Team August 15, 2016

Growing up, there was nothing cooler than hopping in a go-kart for a quick spin around the neighborhood. But you know what would make it even cooler? If you built your own set of electric wheels. That’s exactly what two engineering students, Adrian Georgescu and Masoud Johnson, have done using commonly available components along with a secondhand frame they picked up for $125 and a few Arduino. Read the rest of this entry »

These Arduino bots move plants to sunny and shady spots

Arduino Team August 12, 2016

What do you do when you want your plants to grow but you lack a green thumb? Give them wheels and the ability to seek out sunny and shady spots on their own. This was media artist Kathleen McDermott has done.

The aptly named Sunbot and Shadebot are robots that help houseplants tour the outside world. Sunbot uses photocell (light) sensors to look for sunny places to rest, while Shadebot employs the same sensors to locate shadowy spots. Read the rest of this entry »

Build a simple VU meter with an Arduino Uno and LEDs

Arduino Team August 12, 2016

If you’ve been looking for a simple audio Arduino project, you may want to check out this VU meter from YouTuber RZtronix. The Maker built the device using an Uno along with some LEDs, a couple wires, a breadboard, a sound sensor, and a 5V power supply.

Throwback: Machine pours a drink every time the U.S. wins a medal

Arduino Team August 11, 2016

What do you get when you combine the Olympics, alcohol, and Arduino? An awesome machine that automatically pours a shot whenever your country wins a medal. Although a throwback, we can’t see why this project can’t be replicated for Rio!

It all began four years ago when a bunch of Makers were given early access to the SmartThings platform. To coincide with the London 2012 Summer Games, Andrew Urman developed a device that would celebrate a U.S. victory by dispensing one of three differently colored drinks–Goldschläger for gold, Jose Cuervo for silver, and Jack Daniels for bronze–while waving the American flag, turning on a strobe light, and playing the national anthem. Read the rest of this entry »

Control an LED display with your electric guitar!

Arduino Team August 10, 2016

Have you ever wanted to have a light show that reacts to what you play through you’re favorite electric instrument? Georgia Tech grad student Wil Roberts has, and so he created a guitar-controlled LED display–an impressive project that combines both his Maker and musical chops.

To accomplish this, Roberts used an Arduino Uno along with an Adafruit 16×32 RGB LED matrix panel that responds to the guitar’s signal. The bottom rows are always blue, while the top ones progress from green to red the louder he shreds. The top rows remain red depending on the length of the note being played. Read the rest of this entry »

This LED skirt will take your outfit to infinity and beyond

Arduino Team August 9, 2016

Redditor SexyCyborg–who you may recall from her Hikaru Skirt last year–is back with another Arduino-driven, open-source wearable project. Inspired by traditional Chinese armor, the aptly named Infinity Skirt features an array of LED-lit mirror tiles that together form a flexible, reconfigurable matrix. Safe to say, she’ll certainly turn some heads at this October’s Maker Faire Shenzhen. Read the rest of this entry »

David Cuartielles judges robots at Hebocon Spain and Tokyo

lbalboa August 9, 2016

HeboconMadrid_1

Being a dumb and clumsy robot has never been as fun as in the stupid robots competition Hebocon. This competition series is described as “robot contests for the technically ungifted” by its creator Daiju Ishikawa, and encourages anyone to join with no prior knowledge of robotics necessary.

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HeboconMadrid_3

What’s neat is that unlike other awards, Hebocon’s are symbolic as they are usually made out of recycled parts from every robot in the competition!

So far there have been two editions of Hebocon in Spain (Valencia and Makespace Madrid) where our very own David Cuartielles participated as a judge.

Last weekend, Cuartielles was invited to the Hebocon World Championship in Tokyo where he served on the judging panel alongside Nifty’s Dr. Kunio Matsui and an executive from NicoTsuku (a company dedicated to digital communities). The event drew a total of 32 robots from all across the world, including the United States, Hong Kong, Iceland, France, Singapore, Greece, Taiwan and Japan.

The winners were:

Nifty Award: An unusual car with a spinning doll that shot fake banknotes

NicoTsuku Award: A robot with a middle-age man that turned a table upside down (a literal representation of a Japanese colloquial expression that means getting mad)

Arduino/Genuino Award: A crocodile robot made by a 10-year-old that previously participated in Maker Faire Tokyo

The ‘Remote-Controlled Robot’ from Hong Kong won the sumo competition and it was about fooling the opponent by switching the roles of the remote control and the robot.

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Hebocon Tokyo 2016 Trophy made by Daiju Ishikawa's 4 year old son.

Thanks for inviting us to Hebocon’s World Championship 2016! Check out more on Twitter!