Upgrade your USB keyboard to Bluetooth with this Arduino device

Arduino Team September 8, 2016

If you have an old keyboard lying around and wish it were wireless, Maker DastardlyLabs has a solution.

The “HID Relay” is a small adapter that uses an Arduino Pro Mini, a Bluetooth module, a USB host shield, and a few other components to upgrade any USB keyboard to Bluetooth. DastardlyLabs has made three videos to explain the entire “Bluetooth-ification” process–which can be found below.

So far, the method has worked with all of the keyboards that DastardlyLabs has tested it on, as well as most mice (except for one “gamingish” USB mouse). The Arduino source code and build notes are available on GitHub. The HID Relay was inspired by a recent Arduino hack by Evan Kale.  Read the rest of this entry »

Connected question mark hopes to spark 1 million conversations

Arduino Team September 7, 2016

Suicide prevention charity R U OK? has partnered with digital innovation agency Fusion to create a fully-connected device in the form of a question mark with hopes of sparking a million conversations throughout Australia. Similar to the Olympic Torch, Quentin will be passed from person to person as it makes its way from town to town starting on Thursday, September 8th.

But unlike the Olympic Torch, the route is not planned. Instead, the journey is determined by the challenge it issues to each new keeper motivating them to reconnect face-to-face with people in their lives. Read the rest of this entry »

The Maven Box is an Arduino controller for software developers

Arduino Team September 7, 2016

Matthias Faust has created an Arduino controller for speeding up software development.

The “Maven Box” is based on an Uno and communicates with a Java program running on a desktop. The device is equipped with customizable buttons, switches and a dial, which act as physical inputs for expediting his daily routine. This enables Faust to select a branch from several GitHub projects, stash changes before pulling, pull the changes, trigger a maven build, as well as display the status of six tests on a set of notification LEDs. Read the rest of this entry »

Convert a weed wacker toy into a metal detector

Arduino Team September 6, 2016

Evan Kale is back with another hack. This time, the YouTuber decided to convert a weed wacker-like toy into a metal detector with the help of an Arduino Uno.

As Kale explains, the project is based on a Colpitts Oscillator, which combines an LC circuit with a transistor amplifier for feedback. The frequency of oscillation is somewhere in the 100KHz range, which cannot be heard by humans. Enter the Arduino. When the trigger is pressed, an Arduino program translates the oscillation into an audible tone that is played out of the speaker. When the oscillation exceeds a certain threshold, it also emits a celebratory light show because… why not? Read the rest of this entry »

World Maker Faire: Call for volunteers

Arduino Team September 6, 2016

Calling Makers in New York! Planning on attending World Maker Faire next month? We’re looking for volunteers to join our team during the event, e.g. staffing tables and displays, helping with one-on-one workshops and demos, and providing technical assistance.

If you volunteer with us for one shift, you’ll receive a pass for both days so you can explore and enjoy everything happening around the faire grounds. Water and snacks will be provided, of course, and we’ve prepared a small gift to show our appreciation at the end of the your shift.

Interested? Please fill out this questionnaire, and we’ll get back to you soon!

Unlock your door with a simple hand gesture

Arduino Team September 5, 2016

Gone are the days of fumbling with your keys! Adham Negm has come up with a way to open your door with a simple hand gesture while holding your smartphone.

To accomplish this, Negm uses an Arduino Uno, a servo motor to move the bolt, and a 1Sheeld to interface with the smartphone. The 1Sheeld reads the device’s accelerometer data, and then activates the servo when it recognizes a predefined gesture. Read the rest of this entry »

3 simple filtering techniques to eliminate noise

Arduino Team September 5, 2016

plant-data

Increasing accuracy in the collection of data coming from sensors is a need that, sooner or later, Makers need to face. Paul Martinsen from MegunoLink created a tutorial to eliminate noise from sensor readings on Arduino with three simple filtering techniques.

The Averaging and Running Average techniques are easy to implement as they work by adding a number of measurements together, then dividing the total by the number of measurements. In both cases, the downside is that it can use a lot of memory. Read the rest of this entry »

Using Arduino with VVVV is now easier than ever

Arduino Team September 2, 2016

vvvv-Firmata-Arduino3

VVVV is a hybrid visual/textual live-programming toolkit designed to facilitate the handling of large media environments with physical interfaces, real-time motion graphics, audio and video that can interact with many users simultaneously.

The cool thing is that you can control Arduino and Genuino boards with VVVV by uploading a Firmata sketch and then playing with input and output pins.

What’s more, the team recently released a brand new set of nodes able to talk to your Arduinos. With this implementation, you can: Read the rest of this entry »

330ohms reviews the Genuino MKR1000

Arduino Team September 1, 2016

mkr1000-330ohm

Our friends at 330ohms–who also happen to be Genuino resellers in Mexico–recently published a video a review of the MKR1000 [in Spanish]!

Check it out: Read the rest of this entry »

Sorting cucumbers using AI, Raspberry Pi + Arduino

Arduino Team September 1, 2016

When it comes to farming veggies like cucumbers, the sorting process can often be just as hard and tricky as actually growing them. That’s why Makoto Koike is using Google’s TensorFlow machine learning technology to categorize the cucumbers on his family’s farm by size, shape and color, enabling them to focus on more important and less tedious work.

A camera-equipped Raspberry Pi 3 is used to take images of the cucumbers and send them to a small-scale TensorFlow neural network. The pictures are then forwarded to a larger network running on a Linux server to perform a more detailed classification. From there, the commands are fed to an Arduino Micro that controls a conveyor belt system that handles the actual sorting, dropping them into their respective container. Read the rest of this entry »

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