Archive for the ‘Processing’ Category

Introducing the Arduino TFT LCD screen

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

LCD_blog

 

In conjunction with the release of the new version of the Arduino IDE and the Arduino Robot, we’re also putting out a TCT LCD screen. The screen was developed in conjunction with Complubot and the library relies on the Adafruit GFX and ST7735 libraries.

The screen lets you do all sorts of fun things, like play games or lose the serial monitor to see the values from sensors.

The Arduino specific library, named TFT, extends the Adafruit libraries to support  more Processing-like methods. You can write text, draw shapes, and show bitmap images on the screen in a way that should be familiar to users of Processing.

The screen works well with all types of Arduinos with a little bit of wiring, and fits perfectly in the Esplora and Robot sockets. In addition to all this other goodness, there’s a SD card slot on the back for storing pictures and other data.

If you want to learn more about the screen and what it’s capable of, check out the TFT library page, getting started guide, and product page.

You can buy the TFT screen from the Arduino store now!

If you have something cool you’ve made with this, let us know!

An Arduino-enhanced espresso machine: the “Naked Espresso”

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Reborn is an australian digital creative agency whose mission is to design smart and innovative ideas.
Among their works, a very nice one regards a hack consisting in the re-engineering of a sofisticated espresso machine, to show its peculiar features in the process of coffee making.
By means of an Arduino board, the team can collect real-time information such as flow rate, temperature and pressure; then, a Processing sketch graphically presents this data to the user in an artistic fashion.
Finally, each cup of coffee made this way is decorated with an artwork summarizing this information in its own “personal identity”.
More information can be found here.

[Via: The Naked Espresso]

An Arduino-enhanced espresso machine: the "Naked Espresso"

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Reborn is an australian digital creative agency whose mission is to design smart and innovative ideas.
Among their works, a very nice one regards a hack consisting in the re-engineering of a sofisticated espresso machine, to show its peculiar features in the process of coffee making.
By means of an Arduino board, the team can collect real-time information such as flow rate, temperature and pressure; then, a Processing sketch graphically presents this data to the user in an artistic fashion.
Finally, each cup of coffee made this way is decorated with an artwork summarizing this information in its own “personal identity”.
More information can be found here.

[Via: The Naked Espresso]

Arduino-based theremin

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Theremin is one of the most exiting musical instruments ever made, mainly because of its “quite odd” playing method. Infact, its working principle is based on near-filed coupling between the hands of the theremin player and two metal antennas, used to determine the pitch of a variable-frequency oscillator and to adjust the volume of the output signal, respectively.
Several theremin implementation are possible, such as the “original” analog one (based on the mixing of two sine waves originated by a fixed-frequency oscillator and a variable-frequency one) and those based on digital techniques.
LabIII guys implemented a nice and simple Arduino theremin module, based on a TTL LC-type oscillator, usable not only to play electronic music, but also as a generic sensing-device, for example to control motors and/or to work with Processing, Max etc.
The detailed description of the project, together with schematics and source code, can be found here.

 

[Via: elektor.it]

MAKEmatics – Mathematics for Makers

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Makers need to familiarize themselves with the core concepts and the theory involved in creating applications such as Motion Sensing and Face Tracking. As the technology is churning out new hardware day and night, DIYers need to work hard to keep up and always be in touch with the latest technology around them.

For example, anyone working with Accelerometers/ Gyroscopes or Inertial Measurement Units needs to understand the theory of Vectors, Force, Gravity and be able to work out complex mathematical problems. They may easily get an Arduino Board and an Accelerometer Breakout or an IMU Board and use a library instead of writing their own code but to truly understand the theory behind it; how the device actually works, is not for the faint of heart.

 

One such problem is the Face Tracking Application. Unless you know the real theory behind how the Algorithm actually works, you can only wonder about that robot which follows its master. Greg Borenstein had an idea of creating a website dedicated to this issue. Makematics – Math for Makers.

 

In an introductory post, Greg writes:

” I hope to show that a normal programmer with no special academic training can grapple with these areas of research and find a way in to understanding them. And as I go I aim to create material that will help others do the same. If I can do it, there’s no reason you can’t.”

More and more people should step forward and create or compile a good amount of research data to help fellow makers and DIYers in solving complex mathematical problems.

ITP Winter Show

Sunday, December 18th, 2011

For the past couple weeks I’ve been wrapped up in finals at ITP, and in producing the ITP winter show 2011, along with my colleague Marianne Petit. I lost count of all the great Arduino projects in the show, but probably somewhere around 70% of the 110 projects in the show have a little blue board somewhere inside. If you’re in New York City today or tomorrow, come on down, it’s a good time, with lots of creative projects covering a range of application areas from healthcare  to fashion to video sculpture to politics, data visualization, assistive technologies, and more.

 

 

Here are a few selected at random that are using Arduino:

  • FOLKBOX is a device that allows a person with limited left-hand dexterity to play the acoustic guitar, by Justin Lange.
  • Glute-o-licious is a virtual cycling experience in which the user controls the speed of a first-person video by riding a stationary bike, by Courtney Mitchell
  • HeartRacer is a portable exercise-based video game that plugs into your TV and is powered by your heartbeat, by Nick Santaniello
  • Kinetic Sculpture 5 is composed of five pendulums that the viewer can control. Simply wave your hand over the sensors to “play” the piece, by Ben Light
  • Metrochange is a charity donation platform using New York City subway cards, by Genevieve Hoffman, Paul May, and Stepan Boltalin
  • RFID Beat Box is an instrument that lets you create and play your own music using RFID tags, by Danne Woo and Stefanie Kleinman
  • Nostalgia is an interactive art piece where you can view a memory of the artist’s past by typing, by Yoonjo Choi
Here is a full list of the projects. Come and see them all!

Ball of Dub Keeps Audio in Your Hands

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Ball of Dub from LUSTlab on Vimeo.

Accelerometer to Renoise via OSC  to control trippy and dubby sounds.

[Lizzie] from LustLab sent in her Ball of Dub that turns a few accelerometer and a digital audio workstation and turns everything into an aural experience of wubs and dubs. The Ball of Dub can turn just about anything into dubstep, and does so with a fairly interesting user interface.

There isn’t a build log for the Ball of Dub, but  the folks at LustLab did send in a basic overview of her project. Inside the ball, there’s a Razor IMU from Sparkfun that is attached to the ever-popular XBee wireless transceiver. A tiny program on an Arduino calibrates the gyroscope and accelerometer and sends that data to the DAW at 50Hz.

The host computer is running Renoise, a very popular tracker that can accept MIDI and OSC input. A Processing app parses the ball spin, free fall and impact, averages them over a period of time, and pipes that into the OSC input of Renoise. In [Lizzie]‘s video, the ball spin is sent to a low-pass filter on the baseline track, and the average impact is applied to the vocal track.

via [HackADay] source [LustLab Tumblr] special demo video for the few skeptical comments on HackADay

Control a Slot Car Race With Your Mind

Friday, October 7th, 2011

[Riccardo Giraldi] posted a nice project controlling a slot car race from a Mindwave headset (=> your brain waves).

From B-Reel’s secret laboratory comes a brain-bending experimental project utilising a number of cutting edge tech tools. B-Reel’s UK creative director Riccardo Giraldi led the development of the project, and you can view the explanatory video here, as well as some of the creative musings in a write up below. [...] There are few commercial devices that claim to safely read your brain signals. We ended up choosing the Mindwave headset from Neurosky for this experiment because of its unobtrusive design and its affordable price.

via [TheNextWeb] source [B-Reel]

Arduino DashBoard App

Friday, August 26th, 2011

[Jonathan Clark] from Lousiville Hackerspace has developed an application that is constantly checking the state of I/O pin of your Arduino board, updating a window on your desktop.

ArduinoDashboard is an application for viewing analog and digital pin sensor values from an arduino in real time. This can be used with any arduino sketch and now has compiled versions with no need to download processing.org ide. Sources included as well.

via [HackADay] [Adafruit] source [lvl1.org]

The Simple Act of Making a Mark

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

[Alan Rorie] developed The Simple Act of Making a Mark, an installation about abstracting the creative process: The machine begins by looking at what is placed before it and detects patterns within it. The machine then traces those subtle patterns, amplifying and solidifying them until generative patterns emerge autonomously.

The installation uses an Arduino Uno, an AdaFruit Motor Shield, a single USB HD web camera is used for both the computer vision and to build a time lapse movie of each loop. The software is built using Processing with MessengercontrolP5fullscreen libraries, and v3ga blobDetection. In addition gCode command structure was used and Bresenham’s line algorithm to determine where and when the steppers should move.

via [creativeApplications]