Archive for the ‘Processing’ Category

The Simple Act of Making a Mark

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

[Alan Rorie] developed The Simple Act of Making a Mark, an installation about abstracting the creative process: The machine begins by looking at what is placed before it and detects patterns within it. The machine then traces those subtle patterns, amplifying and solidifying them until generative patterns emerge autonomously.

The installation uses an Arduino Uno, an AdaFruit Motor Shield, a single USB HD web camera is used for both the computer vision and to build a time lapse movie of each loop. The software is built using Processing with MessengercontrolP5fullscreen libraries, and v3ga blobDetection. In addition gCode command structure was used and Bresenham’s line algorithm to determine where and when the steppers should move.

via [creativeApplications]

Light Drive: Light Painting With Arduino

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011

[Kim Pimmel] made nice light-painting stop-motion animations using an Arduino Bluetooth, Processing and some post-production.

The video is stop motion, so every frame is an individually shot photograph. Each photograph is a long exposure photo, with exposures reaching up to 20 seconds in some cases.

To control the lights, I used an Arduino controlled via bluetooth to drive a stepper motor. The stepper motor controls the movements of the lights remotely from Processing.

via [Pimmel’s Vimeo] more on [Flickr]

Must-See Beginner Tutorials For Arduino

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

[Jeremy] made ten Tutorials about Arduino worth our “All Stars” category. He talks about different themes: Blinking Leds [Intro & #2], Electrical Engineering  [#3],  Analog Inputs [#4], Motors & Transistors [#5], Serial Communication & Processing [#6], I2C & Processing [#7], SPI Interfaces [#8], Wireless Communication [#9] and Interrupts [#10].

Thanks to a generous sponsorship from element14, I’m putting together a tutorial series on using the arduino microcontroller platform!  The arduino is a platform that I’ve done several projects with, and I think it is the best possible way for beginners to get acquainted with electronics.  This tutorial series will be aimed at beginner users, but I’m hoping to keep it going with some more advanced topics a few episodes into the future.

thanks Jeremy! ++

via [JeremyBlum] [Element14]

Multi-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino MegaMulti-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino MegaMulti-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino Mega

Monday, October 25th, 2010

 

Possible low-end solution for multi-touch surfaces based on Arduino Mega:

So i’ve been working on this project for a while now as part of my thesis and independently and work is still continuing. So just an overview the project is a multi-touch and multi-modal input sensor that can be utilised behind traditional LCD panels utilising a new method to detect inputs. By using a large IR sensor array consisting of 128 sensors behind the LCD panel and IR light source in front of the Panel we are able to augment the display with the ability to sense a variety of objects near or on the surface; including fingers tips and hands and thus permitting us to enable multi-touch interaction. The inherent nature of the senors allows us to create a low cost high fidelity image sensor allowing us to take advantage of optical sensing which also allows other physical items to be detected, and thus permits us to develop multi-modal interaction schemas.

Amazingly done with Processing and a simple Arduino Mega board.

via [ArduinoForum] source [mtaha]

 

 

 

Multi-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino MegaMulti-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino MegaMulti-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino Mega

Monday, October 25th, 2010

 

Possible low-end solution for multi-touch surfaces based on Arduino Mega:

So i’ve been working on this project for a while now as part of my thesis and independently and work is still continuing. So just an overview the project is a multi-touch and multi-modal input sensor that can be utilised behind traditional LCD panels utilising a new method to detect inputs. By using a large IR sensor array consisting of 128 sensors behind the LCD panel and IR light source in front of the Panel we are able to augment the display with the ability to sense a variety of objects near or on the surface; including fingers tips and hands and thus permitting us to enable multi-touch interaction. The inherent nature of the senors allows us to create a low cost high fidelity image sensor allowing us to take advantage of optical sensing which also allows other physical items to be detected, and thus permits us to develop multi-modal interaction schemas.

Amazingly done with Processing and a simple Arduino Mega board.

via [ArduinoForum] source [mtaha]

 

 

 

Arduino Breathalyzer: Calibrating the MQ-3 Alcohol Sensor

Thursday, September 23rd, 2010

 

 

[Nootropic Design] explains the use (and the approach) to one of the most interesting sensors I’ve seen lately: the MQ-3 alcohol sensor:

The MQ-3 is an alcohol gas sensor that is available for about $5 from Sparkfun, Seeed Studio, and others. It’s easy to use and has sparked the imagination of anyone who has dreamed of building their own breathalyzer device for measuring the amount of alcohol in the human body. I got an MQ-3 sensor a couple of months ago and have spent a lot of time trying to figure out how to do this. After lots of “data gathering”, I found that this task is not as easy as it sounds.

The electronic circuit is explained and Standard Firmata used to visualize the data in Processing.

The most interesting part in the article is when [Michael] tries to calibrate the sensors, by calculating the BAC (blood alcohol content).

It’s really hard to calibrate this sensor for even an approximate BAC reading. It’s even difficult to correlate readings to looked-up BAC values. There are many environmental factors that affect the resistance within the sensor (humidity, temperature, oxygen concentration), and this is only a $5 device anyway. And as evidenced by the lack of consistency between online BAC calculators, there’s not even concensus about how to compute BAC. Law enforcement agencies have much more sophisticated breathalyzers, and often rely on actual blood tests or urinalysis for evidence.

Nevertheess [Michael] provides sketches, codes and everything to make the sensor work. You can’t always expect that precision from a 5$ sensor. Thanks a lot, we really appreciate your work: this is the more complete MQ-3 guide up to now.

via [nootropic]

 

 

 

Arduino Breathalyzer: Calibrating the MQ-3 Alcohol Sensor

Thursday, September 23rd, 2010

 

 

[Nootropic Design] explains the use (and the approach) to one of the most interesting sensors I’ve seen lately: the MQ-3 alcohol sensor:

The MQ-3 is an alcohol gas sensor that is available for about $5 from Sparkfun, Seeed Studio, and others. It’s easy to use and has sparked the imagination of anyone who has dreamed of building their own breathalyzer device for measuring the amount of alcohol in the human body. I got an MQ-3 sensor a couple of months ago and have spent a lot of time trying to figure out how to do this. After lots of “data gathering”, I found that this task is not as easy as it sounds.

The electronic circuit is explained and Standard Firmata used to visualize the data in Processing.

The most interesting part in the article is when [Michael] tries to calibrate the sensors, by calculating the BAC (blood alcohol content).

It’s really hard to calibrate this sensor for even an approximate BAC reading. It’s even difficult to correlate readings to looked-up BAC values. There are many environmental factors that affect the resistance within the sensor (humidity, temperature, oxygen concentration), and this is only a $5 device anyway. And as evidenced by the lack of consistency between online BAC calculators, there’s not even concensus about how to compute BAC. Law enforcement agencies have much more sophisticated breathalyzers, and often rely on actual blood tests or urinalysis for evidence.

Nevertheess [Michael] provides sketches, codes and everything to make the sensor work. You can’t always expect that precision from a 5$ sensor. Thanks a lot, we really appreciate your work: this is the more complete MQ-3 guide up to now.

via [nootropic]

 

 

 

Spiral Wall (Arduino+Processing)Spiral Wall (Arduino+Processing)

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

This project is called “Spiral Wall”  which used Processing to control Arduino board. Pressing the keyboard(or mouse) to control the servo to rotate clockwise or counter-clockwise. You can see how the silk-line rotate and make the diversity of the patterns.

via [MAKE] source [Pandalabcc]

Questo progetto si chiama “Spiral Wall”  e utilizza Processing per controllare Arduino. Attraverso i tasti della tastiera o del mouse si possono controllare i servomotori per avere un movimento orario o anti-orario. Nel video si può notare la seta che cambia di spessore a seconda della rotazione.

via [MAKE] source [Pandalabcc]

Spiral Wall (Arduino+Processing)Spiral Wall (Arduino+Processing)

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

This project is called “Spiral Wall”  which used Processing to control Arduino board. Pressing the keyboard(or mouse) to control the servo to rotate clockwise or counter-clockwise. You can see how the silk-line rotate and make the diversity of the patterns.

via [MAKE] source [Pandalabcc]

Questo progetto si chiama “Spiral Wall”  e utilizza Processing per controllare Arduino. Attraverso i tasti della tastiera o del mouse si possono controllare i servomotori per avere un movimento orario o anti-orario. Nel video si può notare la seta che cambia di spessore a seconda della rotazione.

via [MAKE] source [Pandalabcc]