Archive for the ‘Hackathon’ Category

Castelao Barcamp Vigo 2012

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Castelao Barcamp Vigo 2012

Desde BricoGeek nos llega la noticia de la celebración de una nueva Barcamp, esta vez en Vigo. La reunión perfecta para cacharrear y debatir entre amigos sobre temas como el Open Hardware, Arduino o impresoras 3D entre otros muchos, y puede que con alguna que otra sorpresa.


Unas jornadas DIY muy interesantes que tendrán lugar en las instalaciones del CFP Daniel Castelao de Vigo en las que Alejandro Taracido presentará a su mítico robot ORUGAS con las últimas novedades añadidas.


Sin duda, un evento al que no se debe faltar!


Planning preliminar (sujeto a cambios):

  • Introducción al Open Harwdare
  • Orugas: Robot explorador basado en Arduino
  • Impresión 3D DIY. Crea objetos en tu casa
  • Workshop BricoGeek
  • Taller: DIY Soldadura SMD por refusión
  • Taller: Medidas PWM analógicas
  • Presentación proyecto RACE
  • Raspberry PI como servidor FTP de contenidos


VIA | BricoGeek

Campus Party Berlin – hackathon + free tickets

Wednesday, August 1st, 2012

Campus Party is probably one of the oldest large-size LAN Parties in the world with series of events all over (Valencia, Mexico, Granada, Sao Paulo, Berlin …). We have been present at a few of their events both in Spain and Mexico over the last couple of years.

2012 Berlin Edition: IoT HACKATHON

This time we are going to be making a small workshop + overnight-hackathon about the Internet of Things where we will introduce you to the idea of connecting anything from -almost- anywhere. This event is arranged together with Telefonica Digital, who are partly sponsoring our research in the world of wireless communication.

The times aren’t fixed yet, but we will run a double session between August 24th and 25th. The participants in the workshop will get special gear courtesy of Campus Party Europe and a hands on introduction on how to get connected to the GPRS network. If you have a project that needs to speak out to the net, this workshop is for you.

There is room for 15 participants, join us!

Who will run the workshop?

David Cuartielles, Arduino Co-founder, will be hosting the workshop. However he will be arriving early and hang out at the festival between the 23rd and the 26th.

Francisco Javier Zorzano, from Telefonica Digital, who is the creator of Arduino’s GSM/GPRS library will arrive on the 24th and stay until the end of the festival.

It will be a great opportunity to meet, talk about projects, or hack a couple of things through the night.

We give away 50 free tickets to Arduino community members

Both if you want to come to the workshop or just if you want to pass by to see the festival, we want to give you the chance of getting free tickets to the festival. We are giving away 50 tickets to the event (worth 128Eur) for Arduino community members. Visit this page (or click on the banner at the beginning of the post), fill in the form and keep your fingers crossed. This call ends on August 8th.

IMPORTANT: For those of you applying to get free tickets to the event, we will announce the winners via the Arduino Blog … stay tuned!

Arduino Barcamp ZgZ 2012 – Fotografías

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

Robot Arduino, Arduino Barcamp, david cuartielles, arduteka, arduino, fotos, zaragoza, hardware libre

El pasado fin de semana Arduteka, en colaboración con Cooking Hacks y el proyecto Milla Digital del ayuntamiento de Zaragoza, celebraron la Arduino Barcamp más multitudinaria realizada hasta la fecha en España.

Ponencias de todo tipo, desde impresoras 3D hasta las novedades que acontecen al mundo Arduino de la mano de David Cuartielles, pasando por algo de software libre como Plasma Active, un entorno KDE para dispositivos móviles, hicieron las delicias de todos los asistentes al evento.


Via | Arduteka

Arduino Barcamp Zaragoza 2012

Friday, June 15th, 2012

Arduteka - Arduino Barcamp Zaragoza 2012


Arduteka en colaboración con Cooking Hacks y Milla Digital del ayuntamiento de Zaragoza han preparado un evento con capacidad para más de 400 personas en uno de los edificios más emblemáticos de la ciudad, el Antiguo Seminario Metropolitano de Zaragoza transformando en una moderna Ciudad Administrativa Municipal y que amablemente han cedido para organizar el evento.


Desde charlas sobre arte interactivo con Arduino como interface, pasando por talleres sobre impresión 3D hasta demostración de integración de Arduino con Asterisk será solo una parte de lo que vamos a poder disfrutar, ya que estarán habilitados diferentes Stands como el de Parrot, en que podremos probar el nuevo Ar-Drone 2.0, el de Cooking Hacks que nos amenizarán con micro talleres Arduino e incluso el de nuestros amigos de Ultra-Lab que seguro hará las delicias de los asistentes.


Por si esto fuera poco.. Contaremos con la presencia y colaboración de David Cuartielles, el cual nos ofrecerá una charla sobre los últimos productos Arduino que se está aconteciendo…


Accede ahora a toda la información en la nueva web de Arduteka AQUÍ e inscríbete!!

Te lo vas a perder??


Via | Arduteka


How Arduino helped him win a hackathon: Locksmasher

Sunday, June 3rd, 2012

While browsing Hacker News, I came across this interesting account of Andrei Pop [blog, twitter] which tells about how he won a recent Facebook hackathon using an arduino hack.

It is a recent trend that hardware too has entered the hackathon scenario. Here are interesting excerpts from his honest account!

A few months ago 3 friends and I participated in the facebook hackathon at UBC. It was a 36 hour, redbull-fueled affair in which quite a few teams participated. We won. I’m not telling you this story to brag, I want to share with you what I learned. In all honesty, I was shocked we won, but I think that sticking to a couple of principles helped:

1. Don’t compete with your second best arsenal

2. Solve a real problem

3. Breadth instead of depth can pay off

Yes, you’ve heard this advice before and there are exceptions to every rule… I’m just sharing my personal experience.

Our team consisted of a designer, a biomedical engineer (who didn’t write a single line of code), a CS student (without a doubt the most “qualified” of all of us), and myself (a Political Science grad). I was the only non-engineering-educated person in the room. One essential lesson I have learned over and over in life is that it is futile to compete on a metric that you cannot possibly be the best at. Don’t compete with your second best arsenal. You need to find the edge that nobody else will think of, or where nobody else can be. If the competition can outspend you, outmanouever them. If the guy at the bar is better looking, be funnier. And if most of the guys in the room have PhDs in CS, go for hardware?

The night before the hackathon I picked up an arduino microcontroller, a few LEDs, some alligator clips, and a breadboard. I didn’t really know how things would come together, but I had spent some time hardware hacking and I was really interested in physical computing. I also figured that most of the guys in the room wouldn’t be thinking about hardware (this was a facebook hackathon, most people were looking up the Open Graph API). I hoped hardware would be our edge, and as it turns out, it was.

After a bit of brainstorming and chinese food we agreed to build Locksmasher – an arduino powered unlocking mechanism that would handle authentication through the Open Graph API. We wanted to create a way to grant one-time access to facebook friends that need to get into your house.

Half an hour into our brainstorming, one of my team members had to leave the hackathon to let a friend into his house. This event sparked the idea of locksmasher and outlines my second point – solve a real problem. A craft for a craft’s sake can often be futile. There are definitely exceptions to this, but most of the time, start with a defined problem and apply your craft, instead of the other way around. The judges loved that they could personally relate to the problem of needing to let someone into their house when they weren’t home.

Our hack was very simple – it was nothing more than a glorified switch that talked to facebook. Graeham (our biomedical engineer) hooked up an old door lock to the arduino for our demo. Yazad (the CS student) and I wrote a NodeJS server to talk to facebook. We spent most of our time dealing with authentication, a problem that could have been solved in a few hours by a better hacker who knows the facebook API well. In the meantime Vince (our designer) made everything look very beautiful. This brings me to my last point point, sometimes breadth is better than depth. I want to credit a tremendous amount of our success to Vince’s design work and Graeham’s hardware. By the end of the 36 hours, we had addressed a little bit of everything.

Most of the hackers in the room built some very elegant projects; machine learning algorithms, recommendation algorithms based on your friends likes, data parsing applications. However many of the projects were elegant for elegance sake and didn’t solve a pain point that the judges could relate to. Furthermore, they didn’t look at the whole package (arguably not necessary for a hackathon but I certainly think our sleek UI helped win over the crowd).

It easily highlights arduino’s adaptability to hooking with various technologies. It truly comes out as the bridge between hardware and software.

The project demo lies here.

Any hackathons worldwide in which our readers have used their Arduino? Please do link the demo or your blog :) We would love to read!