Archive for the ‘Ar(t)duino’ Category

High-tech blanket-cum-3D modelling tool

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

3D image input is often a challenging task when it comes to irregular objects like a human body. Here is where an arduino, tilt sensors and a little math comes to the rescue. University of Toronto’s Responsive Architecture at Daniels school created one such blanket.

The petals are made up of a conductive material, which are linked to larger network of conductive threads all in the shape of a hexagon. The loads of tilt sensors send the data of their position with respect to a central Arduino-powered computer which is then able to calculate the slopes between the various flowers and petals on the blanket. Thereby giving out a 3D input to the computer.

The concept will be widely applicable to interaction design, video game controls and numerous other fields.

Via:[Gizmodo, University of toronto - RAD]

Arduino + Flamethrower + Guitarhero = Rockstar

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

Get a little more adventurous and play with fire. Feel like a true rockstar complete with guitar (hero) and flames!

Here are the complete instructions to build one for yourself.

Via[HacknMod]

Electronic music from Jelly

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

Ever fancied making your own musical instrument? Or better, cooking your own musical instrument? Two students in their final year at Les Ateliers French National Institute for Design created this amazing musical project using gelatin, called – Noisy Jelly. When the jelly is stroked, it produces sounds of different patterns.

Variations of shapes and salt concentration, plus the strength of finger contact, determine the audio signals that result. Once created, the jellies are placed on top of the game board, which is a capacitive sensor connected to an arduino that translates the interaction into sound.

The highlight of this piece of art is the visualization of electric signals in the form of theremin-like noises.

Via[Popsci]

Old style tweet printing machine

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

The Twittertape Machine prototype from Adam Vaughan connects to his Twitter account via Ethernet, checks for updates twice every minute, and prints out a hard copy of any new Tweets without the need for printer ink.

Vaughan told us that the idea for the Twittertape Machine was born of a desire to have the kind of old stock ticker seen in movies sitting on his desk. After a lukewarm reception to his pitch from friends, he decided to make his dream a reality. Rather than sacrifice a rare original (like the Edison Universal Stock Ticker used for Ames Bielenberg’s Spring Break project), he opted to build his own replica version from some old brass clock movements, a wooden plinth and a glass dome found online.

It is powered by two AC adapters and is controlled by a network-enabled Arduino-style microcontroller running custom code in the base. The board checks Vaughan’s Twitter account every 30 seconds for new Tweets.

The little thermal printer hidden at the base prints the tweets on a cut-down thermal paper. An awesome product in an awesome demand!

[Via: Twittertape and Gizmag]

Youtube ‘Loading’ animation with Arduino

Friday, March 16th, 2012

How to become YouTube from Thechnocrat on Vimeo.

It may be on a T shirt or it may be on a bag, either way it will look awesome! A simple DIY weekend art using your arduino and a few more common components.

Using an Arduino, a 9-volt battery, and eight ping-pong balls with a white LED inserted into each one, the ring of dots lights up in sequence, endlessly chasing its tail waiting for a non-existant video to load. A giant F5 refresh button would have really completed the costume, though, since that’s everyone’s secret weapon for getting a YouTube clip to finally load.

[Via:Hackaday and Gizmodo]

Youtube 'Loading' animation with Arduino

Friday, March 16th, 2012

How to become YouTube from Thechnocrat on Vimeo.

It may be on a T shirt or it may be on a bag, either way it will look awesome! A simple DIY weekend art using your arduino and a few more common components.

Using an Arduino, a 9-volt battery, and eight ping-pong balls with a white LED inserted into each one, the ring of dots lights up in sequence, endlessly chasing its tail waiting for a non-existant video to load. A giant F5 refresh button would have really completed the costume, though, since that’s everyone’s secret weapon for getting a YouTube clip to finally load.

[Via:Hackaday and Gizmodo]

Edible arduino at NYC

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

The makers at Rockwell group, based in NYC, threw a little studio party this week.

For the occasion, an edible Arduino Uno was served. The Lab members’ Analog taste buds values were HIGH. The lab member who ate pin 13 was blinking in a loop, while the member who ate the reset button required some troubleshooting. In the end, all were left with a taste for creating more interactive objects and environments with the Arduino prototyping platform.

Awesome spirit people! :)

I am Printer

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

Some arty news from K3, Malmo University, Sweden. Three of the students at the Master course in Interaction Design (Scott, Baris and Marcus), in collaboration with the Swedish poet Pär Thörn, created the interactive art installation “I am the poet”. A machine and event dedicated to gather twitter messages including the words “I am” and print them in an endless paper role. They used Arduino to hack an office printer and produce the stream of thoughts in real time.

I AM PRINTER

I AM PRINTER, (c) 2011 by Scott Meadows, Baris Serim and Marcus Ghaly

This project was better explained by the authors themselves:

“I am” printer is a label printer that has been hacked to print a continuous stream of poem by editing the latest twitter feeds that include the phrase “I am” [...] Continuous and automatic printing of the verses, much like a ticker tape, emphasizes the mechanical editing of the poem. Text of the poem is constantly regenerated using algorithms that control the printer.

The work has been displayed in Galleri 21, Malmö together with a projection from Marcus and the web application I am developed by Scott. During the exhibition some 80 verses have been generated, printed and later handed out to visitors. Together with other works, the poem is a piece of cultural magazine Pequod’s 2011 April issue.

Besides the student work, Magnus Sjöholm ha written an article about the process that originated this project. He interviewed Erling Björgvinsson, a post-doc at the Medea Research Studio, and professor at the mentioned Masters’ program.

Pär Thörn came up with some ideas and the students began to develop them. They explored digital flows and wrote software and code that made queries for sentences starting with “I am”. Google, the first choice, turned out to be too limiting. Twitter worked better, but if you create poetry with the same speed as the world tweets “I am …”, it would become completely unreadable. A certain percentage of tweets had to be skipped to slow the pace. In addition, we excluded all retweets, all links, and names.

If you want to know more about this project, you should check the following references:

DIY silhouette sketcher

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

Spanish artist and Fine Arts professor Rubén Tortosa partnered with Computer Science professor Miguel Sánchez, both from Universitat Politècnica de València, to create an interactive arts installation that captures visitors’ silhouettes using a Kinect depth-camera and print them on the wall using an Arduino and a couple of stepper motors. Image processing uses OpenCV library and Daniel Shiffman’s Kinect library for Processing. Arduino code is tasked to act as an interface between the PC and a couple of microstepping motor drivers.

Check the other videos in Miguel’s profile to fully understand how this works. He promised to make better documentation as soon as he has the time, but he couldn’t help sending his proof of concept to our blog as soon as it was done.

Thanks Miguel for the videos, this is beautiful!

Directional shoes for the blind

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Le-chal from Anirudh's presentation

Sometimes, it is amazing to see how technology is used to make the world a better place to live for the less fortunate. One such problem has been thought out and tackled by Anirudh Sharma aka touchaddict on IRC. His invention is called ‘Le-chal’ which translates to ‘Take me there’ in Hindi.

Sharma conceptualized and demonstrated the system at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Media Lab Design and Innovation Workshop 2011.

The Le Chal system comprises of a pair of shoes, one of which is fitted with Vibrators, proximity sensors and a Bluetooth pad which is connected to an Android phone that calculates directions and real time location using Google Maps and the phone’s built-in GPS and compass module.

For all the people calling Arduino a ‘toy’ and ‘too simple’ here is a fact: it’s simplicity gave the inventors the power to rapidly prototype, and the invention was ready in 6 days.

As per his presentation, the system costs barely a few hundred rupees to assemble with 8 mini vibrational motors costing Rs 90, a sole of specified dimensions, an Arduino Lilypad GSM+GPS shield custom made for Rs 400 or a wired version costing Rs 150 for all the components.

The shoes have also been tested at a blind school in Bangalore, India, and have received positive reviews.

Source: Medianama and Pixelonomics