Archive for the ‘tutorials’ Category

Hands on: the Arduino Yún’s Bridge

Thursday, September 5th, 2013

arduino yun - handson

The other day, we gave you an overview of the Yún’s hardware. Today, we are going to talk about the Bridge library, describing how it facilitates communication between the two processors. The Arduino Yún has two different processors on-board: an Atheros AR9331 running Linino (a customized OpenWRT GNU/Linux distribution maintained by Dog Hunter) linked through its serial port with an Atmel ATMega32U4 (the same processor as the Leonardo).
The Bridge concerns itself with communication between these two parts of the Yún.

The Bridge is made of two different parts
One part, written in Python, runs on the GNU/Linux processor and has three functions:

  1. it executes programs on the GNU/Linux side, when asked by Arduino.
  2. it provides a shared storage space, useful for sharing data like sensor readings between the Arduino and the Internet
  3. it receives commands coming from the Internet and passes them directly to the Arduino

The other part of Bridge is the library that runs on the 32U4. The library allows you to access the Linino parts of Bridge through your sketches. (more…)

How to make a pneumatic flight simulator

Friday, August 30th, 2013

 

Arduino-Pneumatic Flight Simulator

Dominick Lee is a programmer, inventor who created the  “LifeBeam Flight Simulator“, a pneumatic-powered dual-axis motion flight simulator  using Arduino Duemilanove. After a few months of diligent work and the help of some generous collaborators he was able to mix physics, robotic and aviation into a motion platform that can make full rotations tilting at about 40 degrees.

The LifeBeam Flight Simulator is a full setup of equipment that runs simultaneously and collaboratively. The data is first sent from the Graphics or “Gaming PC”  through a custom software program that acquires game data. The game data is scaled and converted into specific coordinates for the roll and pitch (X and Y) axis. The program sends out the final signal which is received by an Arduino (Duemilanove). The Arduino has a complex program on it that combines the serial commands and parses certain values to calculate a voltage which is then converted into PWM and sent to a low-pass filter which smoothes the PWM into analog voltage. The analog voltage is connected to a Pneumatic Valve Amplifier which controls the pneumatic cylinders to make the platform move accordingly.

After watching the video below you can read the whole documentation on Instructables and make one yourself!

 

 

DIY Bicycle Computer with Arduino – auch auf Deutsch

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

DIY bike computer videotutorial

This month we are going to work outdoor because Max is going to show us how  to make a DIY computer to customize our bicycle, collecting data of distances and speed. Watch the video tutorial in german language below and take a look at the schematics and the code.  Looking forward to your hacks!

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Diesen Monat geht es ab nach Draußen, denn Max zeigt uns wie man einen DIY Computer für ein Fahrrad bauen kann, welcher Daten über die Strecke und die Geschwindigkeit mit einem Arduino UNO ermittelt. Seht euch das deutschsprachige Video an und schaut euch den Schaltplan, die Komponenten und den Code an. Wir freuen uns auf eure Hacks!

Arduino Starter Kit video tutorials now released in Creative Commons

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

StarterKitVideotutorial

Last year to celebrate the launch of the new Arduino Starter KitRS Components in collaboration with Arduino,  produced  10 video tutorials featuring Massimo Banzi showing how to create cool projects with the redesigned release of the Kit and all its components.

 

Today RS Components announced on their Twitter and Google+ that the Arduino video tutorials are now marked with a Creative Commons license, that means that you can remix and reuse them as you like. (All the the sketches are available in the Arduino IDE)

We created a Playlist on Arduino official Channel and soon we’ll add also German and French subtitles.

 

Jugando a SuperTux Cart con Arduino Esplora – Video tutorial

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

videotutorial supertux spanish

(en español a continuación)

Last April we launched the first of a series of video tutorial in german language with the aim of exploring cool projects with Arduino boards. Now we are happy to announce we are starting a collaboration with Pablo Murillo from Arduteka to create video tutorials in spanish language to be published  on the official Arduino channel on Youtube.

Starting today you can enjoy a step-by-step tutorial to understand how use your Arduino Esplora  as a customized computer gamepad to play any of your videogames.

The code is configured to be suitable for SuperTuxKart, our favorite  open-source racing game!

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El pasado abril se lanzó el primero de una serie de video tutoriales en Alemán, con el objetivo de explorar nuevos proyectos interesantes a desarrollar con Arduino. Hoy estamos felices de anunciar que empezamos una colaboración con Pablo Murillo de Arduteka para crear video tutoriales en Español, que se publicará en el canal oficial de Arduino en Youtube.

A partir de hoy se puede disfrutar de un tutorial paso a paso para entender cómo usar Arduino Esplora como un gamepad personalizado para jugar en cualquiera de sus videojuegos.

El código está configurado para ser utilizado con SuperTuxKart, nuestro juego de carreras de código abierto favorito!

Pimp up your camera with Arduino timelapse video tutorial – auch auf Deutsch

Saturday, May 25th, 2013

timelapse videotutorial

 

Last month we launched the first of a series of tutorials hosted on our Youtube Channel and created by Max of MaxTechTV in german language.

Today we are publishing the second video called “Pimp-up your camera with an Arduino timelapse“. The video explains how to connect an Arduino UNO with you camera and shoot pictures, for example, every 1, 5, 10 seconds to create wonderful videos of slow processes that would normally appear subtle to the human eye.

Enjoy the tutorial below and share with us the results of your experimentations!

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Letzten Monat haben wir das erste einer Reihe von Video-Tutorials auf unserem YouTube Kanal veröffentlicht. Erstellt werden die Tutorials von Max von MaxTechTV für all diejenigen von euch, die Deutsch sprechen.

Heute veröffentlichen wir das zweite Video mit dem Titel “Erstelle tolle Zeitrafferaufnahmen mit deiner Kamera & Arduino”. Das Video erklärt wie man einen Arduino UNO mit einer Kamera verbindet um mit dieser in bestimmten Abständen, wie z.B. 1, 5 oder 10 Sekunden, ein Bild aufzunehmen. So kann man beeindruckende Videos von langsamen Prozessen erstellen, die dem menschlichen Augen sonst verborgen bleiben würden.Viel Spaß mit dem Tutorial und teilt mit uns die Ergebnisse eurer Experimente!

 

 

A cheap WiFi interface for Arduino

Thursday, December 27th, 2012

In this tutorial, Luca shows how to add WiFi connectivity to your Arduino boards without using a WiFi shield. Instead, he has combined a standard Ethernet shield with a commercial (and quite cheap) WiFi router:

I found the TL-WR702N nano router by TP-LINK that, with a cost of about 20€ on eBay, can work also as a wireless client: in this mode the router acts like a “bridge” between the device connected to its ethernet port and a Wi-fi network.

After a simple setup, where Luca configured the router as a WiFi client, the Arduino board has become accessible from the wireless network. Enjoy! :)

[Via: Luca's blog]

Tuco 1.0: a digital door plate

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

In his blog, Andrea (a student in computer science from University of Napoli “Parthenope”) describes how to make a smart door plate with Arduino.

(more…)

Arduino Starter Kit is here to Rock

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

We are eager to announce the launch of the official Arduino Starter Kit! We have been working hard together in developing a complete selection of 15 projects that will let you become a true arduino tinkerer!

But that’s more:

The new starter kit has been developed together with a series of ten video tutorials hosted by Arduino co-founder Massimo Banzi, which can be viewed at www.rs-components.com/arduino. Ideally used in conjunction with the videos, the kit provides an open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. It contains all of the essential components required to start programming with the Arduino Uno board, and a guidebook featuring 15 different projects, which are designed to evolve the user from beginner to professional level. Comprising a motor, servomotor and driver, the kit also offers particular benefits to users wishing to apply mechatronics to their designs.

read through for the whole components and projects list

(more…)

A simple Arduino-based tachometer

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

 

Chris, from PyroElectro.com, proposes a comprehensive tutorial on how to make a simple, yet effective, Arduino-based tachometer.
The circuit is very simple: an IR led is coupled with an IR phototransistor to detect possible interruptions of the light beam, while the Arduino is responsible to calculate the time interval between two such events. Finally, a LCD is used to display the current RPM to the user.
To validate his project, a typical computer fan has been used in the set-up and the outcomes have demonstrated to be very close to the true RPM value (2600 +/- 100 RPMs).
The bill of materials, as well as the schematic, the source code and a detailed tutorial on how to build the circuit is available here.

[Via: PyroElectro.com]