Archive for the ‘tutorials’ Category

How to print a Pirate Hook with your Materia 101

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

timelapse4

Using a 3d printer means playing with some hardware but especially some softwares. In the tutorial of this week, the fourth tutorial of our series , Kris is going to introduce you how to work with Slic3r, a G-Code generator for 3d printers and basically a tool you need to convert a digital 3D model into printing instructions for your 3D printer. Slic3r is an open source software able to cut the model into horizontal slices (layers), generates toolpaths to fill them and calculates the amount of material to be extruded so that you can reach good results. (more…)

Build a 3d-printed remote control box with the help of Materia 101

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014

MicroCase

One of the pleasures of watching TV depends on the use of a remote control that allows you to change channels from where you are. In the tutorial of this week, Kristoffer made an add-on to a previous lesson teaching us how to control a computer with a remote control like the one of your TV using Arduino Micro, IR-sensor. The add-on is a custom and colourful 3d-printed case created with Freecad and Materia 101.

Follow the 12 steps of the lesson on Scuola >> (more…)

Making something useful for your home with Materia 101

Tuesday, November 25th, 2014

motionbutton

When you become a happy owner of a Materia 101 3d printer, the first days are really important to start experimenting with the right attitude. Understanding quickly how to get what you want from it means becoming aware of the potential applications of the 3d printing technology in your environment.

Last week we published  the tutorial  on  “Getting started with Materia 101″ created by Kristoffer  and kicking off a series of step-by-step guides to explore different topics, softwares and settings for your 3d printer.

Take a look at the second tutorial focused on  fixing things at home: “Making something useful” tutorial shows you how to start from a need, to design and print a solution. It feels great to be able to fix what’s broken! (more…)

Hands on: the Arduino Yún's Bridge

Thursday, September 5th, 2013

arduino yun - handson

The other day, we gave you an overview of the Yún’s hardware. Today, we are going to talk about the Bridge library, describing how it facilitates communication between the two processors. The Arduino Yún has two different processors on-board: an Atheros AR9331 running Linino (a customized OpenWRT GNU/Linux distribution maintained by Dog Hunter) linked through its serial port with an Atmel ATMega32U4 (the same processor as the Leonardo).
The Bridge concerns itself with communication between these two parts of the Yún.

The Bridge is made of two different parts
One part, written in Python, runs on the GNU/Linux processor and has three functions:

  1. it executes programs on the GNU/Linux side, when asked by Arduino.
  2. it provides a shared storage space, useful for sharing data like sensor readings between the Arduino and the Internet
  3. it receives commands coming from the Internet and passes them directly to the Arduino

The other part of Bridge is the library that runs on the 32U4. The library allows you to access the Linino parts of Bridge through your sketches. (more…)

Hands on: the Arduino Yún’s Bridge

Thursday, September 5th, 2013

arduino yun - handson

The other day, we gave you an overview of the Yún’s hardware. Today, we are going to talk about the Bridge library, describing how it facilitates communication between the two processors. The Arduino Yún has two different processors on-board: an Atheros AR9331 running Linino (a customized OpenWRT GNU/Linux distribution maintained by Dog Hunter) linked through its serial port with an Atmel ATMega32U4 (the same processor as the Leonardo).
The Bridge concerns itself with communication between these two parts of the Yún.

The Bridge is made of two different parts
One part, written in Python, runs on the GNU/Linux processor and has three functions:

  1. it executes programs on the GNU/Linux side, when asked by Arduino.
  2. it provides a shared storage space, useful for sharing data like sensor readings between the Arduino and the Internet
  3. it receives commands coming from the Internet and passes them directly to the Arduino

The other part of Bridge is the library that runs on the 32U4. The library allows you to access the Linino parts of Bridge through your sketches. (more…)

How to make a pneumatic flight simulator

Friday, August 30th, 2013

 

Arduino-Pneumatic Flight Simulator

Dominick Lee is a programmer, inventor who created the  “LifeBeam Flight Simulator“, a pneumatic-powered dual-axis motion flight simulator  using Arduino Duemilanove. After a few months of diligent work and the help of some generous collaborators he was able to mix physics, robotic and aviation into a motion platform that can make full rotations tilting at about 40 degrees.

The LifeBeam Flight Simulator is a full setup of equipment that runs simultaneously and collaboratively. The data is first sent from the Graphics or “Gaming PC”  through a custom software program that acquires game data. The game data is scaled and converted into specific coordinates for the roll and pitch (X and Y) axis. The program sends out the final signal which is received by an Arduino (Duemilanove). The Arduino has a complex program on it that combines the serial commands and parses certain values to calculate a voltage which is then converted into PWM and sent to a low-pass filter which smoothes the PWM into analog voltage. The analog voltage is connected to a Pneumatic Valve Amplifier which controls the pneumatic cylinders to make the platform move accordingly.

After watching the video below you can read the whole documentation on Instructables and make one yourself!

 

 

DIY Bicycle Computer with Arduino – auch auf Deutsch

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

DIY bike computer videotutorial

This month we are going to work outdoor because Max is going to show us how  to make a DIY computer to customize our bicycle, collecting data of distances and speed. Watch the video tutorial in german language below and take a look at the schematics and the code.  Looking forward to your hacks!

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Diesen Monat geht es ab nach Draußen, denn Max zeigt uns wie man einen DIY Computer für ein Fahrrad bauen kann, welcher Daten über die Strecke und die Geschwindigkeit mit einem Arduino UNO ermittelt. Seht euch das deutschsprachige Video an und schaut euch den Schaltplan, die Komponenten und den Code an. Wir freuen uns auf eure Hacks!

Arduino Starter Kit video tutorials now released in Creative Commons

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

StarterKitVideotutorial

Last year to celebrate the launch of the new Arduino Starter KitRS Components in collaboration with Arduino,  produced  10 video tutorials featuring Massimo Banzi showing how to create cool projects with the redesigned release of the Kit and all its components.

 

Today RS Components announced on their Twitter and Google+ that the Arduino video tutorials are now marked with a Creative Commons license, that means that you can remix and reuse them as you like. (All the the sketches are available in the Arduino IDE)

We created a Playlist on Arduino official Channel and soon we’ll add also German and French subtitles.

 

Jugando a SuperTux Cart con Arduino Esplora – Video tutorial

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

videotutorial supertux spanish

(en español a continuación)

Last April we launched the first of a series of video tutorial in german language with the aim of exploring cool projects with Arduino boards. Now we are happy to announce we are starting a collaboration with Pablo Murillo from Arduteka to create video tutorials in spanish language to be published  on the official Arduino channel on Youtube.

Starting today you can enjoy a step-by-step tutorial to understand how use your Arduino Esplora  as a customized computer gamepad to play any of your videogames.

The code is configured to be suitable for SuperTuxKart, our favorite  open-source racing game!

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El pasado abril se lanzó el primero de una serie de video tutoriales en Alemán, con el objetivo de explorar nuevos proyectos interesantes a desarrollar con Arduino. Hoy estamos felices de anunciar que empezamos una colaboración con Pablo Murillo de Arduteka para crear video tutoriales en Español, que se publicará en el canal oficial de Arduino en Youtube.

A partir de hoy se puede disfrutar de un tutorial paso a paso para entender cómo usar Arduino Esplora como un gamepad personalizado para jugar en cualquiera de sus videojuegos.

El código está configurado para ser utilizado con SuperTuxKart, nuestro juego de carreras de código abierto favorito!

Pimp up your camera with Arduino timelapse video tutorial – auch auf Deutsch

Saturday, May 25th, 2013

timelapse videotutorial

 

Last month we launched the first of a series of tutorials hosted on our Youtube Channel and created by Max of MaxTechTV in german language.

Today we are publishing the second video called “Pimp-up your camera with an Arduino timelapse“. The video explains how to connect an Arduino UNO with you camera and shoot pictures, for example, every 1, 5, 10 seconds to create wonderful videos of slow processes that would normally appear subtle to the human eye.

Enjoy the tutorial below and share with us the results of your experimentations!

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Letzten Monat haben wir das erste einer Reihe von Video-Tutorials auf unserem YouTube Kanal veröffentlicht. Erstellt werden die Tutorials von Max von MaxTechTV für all diejenigen von euch, die Deutsch sprechen.

Heute veröffentlichen wir das zweite Video mit dem Titel “Erstelle tolle Zeitrafferaufnahmen mit deiner Kamera & Arduino”. Das Video erklärt wie man einen Arduino UNO mit einer Kamera verbindet um mit dieser in bestimmten Abständen, wie z.B. 1, 5 oder 10 Sekunden, ein Bild aufzunehmen. So kann man beeindruckende Videos von langsamen Prozessen erstellen, die dem menschlichen Augen sonst verborgen bleiben würden.Viel Spaß mit dem Tutorial und teilt mit uns die Ergebnisse eurer Experimente!

 

 

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