Archive for the ‘English’ Category

Massimo’s Talk at TEDGlobal

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

We are really thrilled to blog Massimo’s delightful talk of yesterday about Arduino and the open hardware movement: TED team chose it to be the first video to be traslated and released for everybody to see.

Enjoy!

 

Portable and cloud-based heart rate tracker

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

In his blog, Charalampos describes his experience with SeeedStudio’s Grove Ear-clip Heart Rate sensor and Cosm (former Pachube) cloud service. The employed sensor is quite cheap and can detect heart pulses from the ear lobe, by measuring the infra-red light reflected by the tissue and by checking for intensity variations.

By connecting this sensor with an ADK board and, in turn, with an Android smartphone, Charalampos implemented a portable heart-rate tracker, which is used to send the recorded data to Cosm cloud service.

For more information and sample code, see here.

[Via: Building Internet of Things]

 

 

ArduGate: controlling Arduino with web browser

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

ardugate

ArduGate: a web gateway for Arduino that makes possible to use JavaScript inside the web browser to interact with Arduino. Currently available just for Windows,  however, release for Linux and MAC OS X will be available soon.

 

Matatino Lets Arduino Connect To Your Mac Apps

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

[Robotgrrl] shared a super-userful way to import Arduino Data to  Mac applications, with tutorials and examples.

We created Matatino, a framework that lets you communicate between your Mac applications and your Arduino, You can follow our tutorials to get started with adding Matatino to your project. To see Matatino in action, check out Meters for Arduino. We will be adding more examples, libraries and tutorials for the Android ADK, iOS Redpark Serial Cable, Processing and OpenFrameworks in the future! You can stay informed about updates through RobotGrrl’s blog Apps4Arduino category feed.

via [RobotGrrl/Apps4Arduino]

The Jacket That Tells You You’re Drunk

Thursday, October 13th, 2011

[Matt Leggett] designed a jacket that is telling you whether you are able to drive or not:

Included in the jacket are an Arduino microprocessor, an alcohol sensor, and a series of LED’s that “provide an elegant solution to the drink driving problem.” A breathalyzer located in the pocket of the jacket, analyses the sample and then lights, that are stitched into the forearm, indicate how drunk you are. The LED lights glow when alcohol is detected and the brighter they glow, the worse you are.

via [Joe.ie]

Fluid Fantasy Brings The Galaxy In Your Sink

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011

 

[Kim Pimmel] – which you may remember from the LightDrive Project – made a nice animation made out on bubbles & ferrofluid liquid.

I combined everyday soap bubbles with exotic ferrofluid liquid to create an eerie tale, using macro lenses and time lapse techniques. Black ferrofluid and dye race through bubble structures, drawn through by the invisible forces of capillary action and magnetism.

Time-lapse sequences: Nikon D90, Nikkor 60mm macro lens and custom built intervalometer. 
Motion-control: Arduino driven scanner platform and mirror rigs
Score: Ableton Live

via [WiredUK] source [Vimeo]

Arduino Powered 2.4 GHz Spectrum Analyzer Lets You

Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

Arduino forum user [Blibo] shares its 2.4 Ghz spectrum analyzer project on the forum. The project is based on the CYWM6935 board (wireless), an Atmega 328 and a Nokia 5110 LCD-

I finished the (mostly) permanent version of my 2.4ghz spectrum analyzer, and soldered it up. I included 3 modes for scanning (fast, slow, and ghost – like the long exposure on a camera), plus a function to display the voltage on an analog pin, and graph it (for when the oscilloscope’s not cooperating). These modes are toggled through by hitting the big push button [...] I have already used it to help setup my wireless network, (channel, location, things that cause interference), and it is always interesting to see what uses the 2.4ghz spectrum. So far, the things that I’ve noticed on the spectrum while walking around with the analyzer are: 
-microwave ovens (huge disturbance in the middle of the spectrum)
-Wifi 
-Cordless phones
-Bluetooth
-Wireless keyboard
-Wireless speakers
The fast mode is ok for seeing EMI, but for digital signals, the slow mode is best. The ghost mode also gives a general idea of spectrum use over a period of time.

via [HackADay] source(code) on [Arduino Forum]

IAAC’s CAN-Based Interactive Architectures

Monday, August 1st, 2011

Barcelona-based IAAC school is hosting a summer school (in Barcelona and Mumbay). The theme of this year’s course is creating an urban tool of a networked city based on a new informational layer.

What happens if we think Urbanism and Energy through a new informational layer added in our cities?

(more…)

Digital Lathe By FabLabItalia (Build Your Own!)

Monday, July 18th, 2011

Some time ago the guys at Fablab Italia in Turin joined a city exhibition of art, design and related. The exhibition is hosted in Vanchiglia, a neighborhood of Turin, and it’s called Vanchiglia Open Lab (LOV). The project they managed to bring to the Open Lab is really interesting: a digital lathe which lets you interact physically with a 3D program and print your own sketch with the 3D printer.

You need 5 potentiometers hooked up to the first five Analog pins of Arduino. 4 of them are used to modify the shape, the fifth is used to change the step & resolution of the shape. An Hoberman-style sphere lets you control the rotation of those 5 pots in a different way.

Wanna try? Donwload project files (Arduino, Blender, Laser Cutter) from Fablab Italia’s Wiki.

Via [FablabItalia]

Arduino Ethernet, ADK Available for purchase

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

 

This week we are releasing a few new products and services. We begin with the Arduino Ethernet and the Arduino Mega ADK.

The Arduino Ethernet combines a regular Arduino board with the Ethernet Shield into a single board designed to power your internet of things projects. It has the ability (if fitted with an optional module) to be powered directly from the ethernet cable using a standard called “Power over Ethernet“,  this makes ideal for permanent installations in buildings and similar structures.

For example, prototypes of the board have been installed and have been operating for over a year at the “Campari Gallery” museum in Milan Italy relaying sensor data via OSC to video players and other interactive installations with amazing reliability.

You can use any FTDI compatible cable or module to program it. For this purpose we are also releasing a new USB2Serial module that is based on the same circuit that’s used in the Arduino UNO, hacking the firmware on the atmega8u2 will allow you to make amazing stuff with this cheap module.

The Arduino Mega ADK is an exciting new addition to the lineup. Google recently released an Arduino-derived open source accessory development kit (ADK) for Android phones and tablets. This is our take on the platform.

It’s essentially an Arduino Mega 2560 with the addition of a USB Host chip that communicates with the phone and a beefy power supply (the board needs to be able to charge the phone). The communication is implemented using Oleg Mazurov’s USB Host library.

The ADK Sensor Kit makes it incredibly simple to develop with the ADK because there is no need to know anything about electronics, small modular sensors and actuators plug on top of the Mega ADK letting you create protoypes or robust installations in minutes!

Later this week we’ll release a few code examples that will make it very easy for anyone to build Android accessories with Arduino.

We hope you enjoy our new creations.