Archive for the ‘Hacks’ Category

Flash / Arduino Based Speed DetectorFlash / Arduino Based Speed DetectorFlash / Arduino Based Speed Detector

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

 

Flash / Arduino Based Speed Detector from Mike Chambers on Vimeo.

[Mike Chambers] developed a nice Flash / Arduino based speed detector with clients for Mac, Windows and Android based devices (via Adobe AIR 2.5 beta).

Here is how it works. I have an Arduino Duemilanove with ATMega328 which has two photo-resistors connected (with a 10k pull down resistor). I set up two laser pointers to shine a laser directly onto the photo-resistor (which is enclosed within a dark box). The Arduino monitors the values returned from the light sensor, and watches for any changes that indicate that the laser bean has been broken. When both laser beams are broken, the Arduino calculates the amount of time between when each sensor was tripped. It then sends that value to the Adobe AIR based client, which is connected to the Arduino via USB / Serial port and a serial port proxy (in the case, TinkerProxy).

You can get the schematics and the codes from this project on Mike’s github.

via [MikeChambers]

 

Flash / Arduino Based Speed DetectorFlash / Arduino Based Speed DetectorFlash / Arduino Based Speed Detector

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

 

Flash / Arduino Based Speed Detector from Mike Chambers on Vimeo.

[Mike Chambers] developed a nice Flash / Arduino based speed detector with clients for Mac, Windows and Android based devices (via Adobe AIR 2.5 beta).

Here is how it works. I have an Arduino Duemilanove with ATMega328 which has two photo-resistors connected (with a 10k pull down resistor). I set up two laser pointers to shine a laser directly onto the photo-resistor (which is enclosed within a dark box). The Arduino monitors the values returned from the light sensor, and watches for any changes that indicate that the laser bean has been broken. When both laser beams are broken, the Arduino calculates the amount of time between when each sensor was tripped. It then sends that value to the Adobe AIR based client, which is connected to the Arduino via USB / Serial port and a serial port proxy (in the case, TinkerProxy).

You can get the schematics and the codes from this project on Mike’s github.

via [MikeChambers]

 

Arduino Uno as JoystickArduino Uno as JoystickArduino Uno as Joystick

Sunday, October 24th, 2010

Arduino Forum User [ant.b] has shared his personal Arduino UNO hack with other LUFA firmwares. He tries to turn an Arduino UNO in a Joystick, uploading a new firmware on the 8u2, and summarize it in a very useful step by step guide.

(more…)

Arduino Uno as JoystickArduino Uno as JoystickArduino Uno as Joystick

Sunday, October 24th, 2010

Arduino Forum User [ant.b] has shared his personal Arduino UNO hack with other LUFA firmwares. He tries to turn an Arduino UNO in a Joystick, uploading a new firmware on the 8u2, and summarize it in a very useful step by step guide.

(more…)

GardenBot Is Monitoring Your Garden

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

 

Very interesting bottom-up product (but it’s not really a product, it’s more of an experience of nature-lovers and DIYers) do look after your garden:

GardenBot is a garden monitoring system. This means that you put sensors in your garden, and GardenBot will show you charts of the conditions in your garden — so you can see the world the way your plants see it.

(more…)

GardenBot Is Monitoring Your Garden

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

 

Very interesting bottom-up product (but it’s not really a product, it’s more of an experience of nature-lovers and DIYers) do look after your garden:

GardenBot is a garden monitoring system. This means that you put sensors in your garden, and GardenBot will show you charts of the conditions in your garden — so you can see the world the way your plants see it.

(more…)

Arduino Mega Based KeyGloveArduino Mega Based KeyGloveArduino Mega Based KeyGlove

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

 

 

The Keyglove is a portable Arduino-powered glove that uses touch combinations to generate keyboard and mouse control codes using only one hand. Once learned, the glove can easily be used without looking, making it perfect for embedded/wearable environments. The glove is thin and light, built to allow other activities (such as writing or driving) without being in the way.

nice MEGA-based project. Have a look at the similar devices page to have a nice compairason of similar project online with different hardware solutions.

via [KeyGlove]

 

 

 

 

Arduino Mega Based KeyGloveArduino Mega Based KeyGloveArduino Mega Based KeyGlove

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

 

 

The Keyglove is a portable Arduino-powered glove that uses touch combinations to generate keyboard and mouse control codes using only one hand. Once learned, the glove can easily be used without looking, making it perfect for embedded/wearable environments. The glove is thin and light, built to allow other activities (such as writing or driving) without being in the way.

nice MEGA-based project. Have a look at the similar devices page to have a nice compairason of similar project online with different hardware solutions.

via [KeyGlove]

 

 

 

 

Hacked Toy Internet Alert Circuit

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

 

 

Roth Mobot shared a nice project about an “interface between the Internet and a common circuit bent toy.

We decided to create a circuit that would activate a toy whenever someone logged into Roth Mobot’s web site. We designed a simple and elegant solution using an Arduino, a home made Vactrol, a common electronic toy, and three simple scripts written in different programming languages. We’d like to thank William Swyter for lending us his Arduino, and Factory Smoke for his Vactrol suggestion, which stopped us from creating overly-complicated custom circuitry with transistors and diodes, and made the programming a piece of cake. The result was an elegant circuit that electrically insulates the toy from the Arduino (and the computer) by “optically coupling” them with light.

(more…)

Hacked Toy Internet Alert Circuit

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

 

 

Roth Mobot shared a nice project about an “interface between the Internet and a common circuit bent toy.

We decided to create a circuit that would activate a toy whenever someone logged into Roth Mobot’s web site. We designed a simple and elegant solution using an Arduino, a home made Vactrol, a common electronic toy, and three simple scripts written in different programming languages. We’d like to thank William Swyter for lending us his Arduino, and Factory Smoke for his Vactrol suggestion, which stopped us from creating overly-complicated custom circuitry with transistors and diodes, and made the programming a piece of cake. The result was an elegant circuit that electrically insulates the toy from the Arduino (and the computer) by “optically coupling” them with light.

(more…)

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