Archive for the ‘Mega’ Category

Your Arduino can tell you which countries you AREN’T in

Monday, August 29th, 2016

A few months ago, Connor Nishijima demonstrated a neat project highlighting the Arduino Uno’s “built-in motion sensor.” Now, he’s using the Arduino Mega’s “built-in anti-GPS” to guess which countries you’re NOT in.  How, you ask? By reading the frequency of the alternating current (AC) cycles in his house using an open analog pin.

You’ll need an Arduino Mega to fit the array of Strings below, Uno doesn’t cut it even with use of PROGMEM. The Sketch is also written to use the Seeed Studio TFT Shield, but if you remove all “TFT” lines from the sketch you can just see the output in the Serial Monitor. An antenna (just a breadboard jumper) on A7 might be necessary.

Since various locations have varying power systems, Nishijima was able to program the board with a list of all those that cycle the AC at 60Hz and 50Hz AC. By knowing which one you have, the Arduino can then reckon which countries you’re not in and display its findings on the TFT shield.


Talk to the (animatronic) hand!

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

Maker Shuang Peng has created a 13 DOF animatronic hand using an Arduino Mega, seven servo motors, and six air cylinders, along with a Leap Motion sensor for control.

As briefly described on his Instructables page:

There are various ways to control the hand. I’ve tried the Leap Motion sensor and the data glove, which catches my motion via Processing. Then the Processing communicate with the Mega via serial. Now, I’m trying to use EMOTIV Insight EEG sensor to control it.

HardWino is an open-source, Arduino-based cocktail maker

Monday, August 15th, 2016

While it may not be the first (nor will it be the last) robotic bartender we’ve seen, Pierre Charlier has come up with a clever and affordable way to mix the perfect drink at home. Say hello to HardWino.

The automatic cocktail maker consists of a six-slot, rotating beverage holder that is controlled by an Arduino Mega and uses a TFT screen to accept orders. The project also includes stepper motors and L298 driver boards, which are supported by 3D-printed parts. Power is supplied through a 12V DC jack. (more…)

Build an electric go-kart on a budget with Arduino

Monday, August 15th, 2016

Growing up, there was nothing cooler than hopping in a go-kart for a quick spin around the neighborhood. But you know what would make it even cooler? If you built your own set of electric wheels. That’s exactly what two engineering students, Adrian Georgescu and Masoud Johnson, have done using commonly available components along with a secondhand frame they picked up for $125 and a few Arduino. (more…)

An Arduino-based cartridge reader for Nintendo systems

Monday, August 1st, 2016

GitHub user Sanni has created a Nintendo cartridge and save game reader shield for the Arduino Mega.

The ROM gets saved to an SD card. You can also read/write save files to the SRAM, display information about the cartridge on a 0.96″ 128X64 OLED LCD, and calculate the checksum of your ROM dump. You control it using the push button–one click moves the selection down, a double-click moves it up, and a long press executes the current menu option. (more…)

Monitor your solar energy with a dual-axis tracker

Thursday, July 28th, 2016

As part of a thesis project, Belgian student Bruce Helsen built a dual-axis tracker for optimizing solar panel use. Although adding a tracking system to a larger installation can be pricey (and likely not the most cost-effective option), it can certainly come in handy for smaller units.

Helsen’s dual-axis tracker fits two 12V 150W solar panels for a 300W peak output, and has a few key features: it turns to make sure the panels are aligned with the sun for as long as possible, it measures the panels’ voltage and current then calculates the generated power and energy, and it sends that data from the monitor to ThingSpeak for analysis and logging. There’s also an LCD to display the readings.


Interactive sidewalk plays music to your shadows

Wednesday, July 13th, 2016

Designed by Montreal studio Daily tous les jours, Mesa Musical Shadows is a public installation that turns the sidewalk of Arizona’s Mesa Arts Center into a super-sized dance pad which reacts to the shadows of passersby with the sounds of singing.

Shadows cast on different tiles trigger different voices, all while singing in harmony. Length of shadow is dependent upon the season, the time of day and the weather; meaning, a visitor may never quite cast the same shadow twice. The sounds themselves also change with the angle of the sun, which makes interacting with the installation a dynamic experience in the morning, midday, evening, and in the middle of the night. As the day turns into night, the tracks shift from upbeat, Pitch Perfect-like acapella to creepier, ominous tones. (more…)

Building a water collection vessel with an Arduino Mega

Thursday, July 7th, 2016


As part of an electrical and electronic engineering course at Singapore Polytechnic, a group of students were challenged to build an aquatic vehicle that could collect samples from one and two meters underwater. After three months of hard work, the Imp Bot was brought to life!

Imp Bot is controlled by a mobile application made using the MIT App Inventor. Communication is achieved via a Bluetooth module hooked up to an Arduino Mega, while an onboard GPS sensor is used to log sampling locations in the app. Power is provided by a LiPo battery, which supplies high current to the two DC motors responsible for moving the 11-pound vessel around. (more…)

Autonomous machine makes music with 7 lasers and 42 fans

Monday, June 27th, 2016

Russian artist ::vtol:: is no stranger to the Arduino blog. His latest project–which was designed for the Polytechnic Museum Moscow and Ars Electronica Linz–is an autonomous light-music installation called “Divider.” The wall-mounted soundscape consists of seven lasers that send rays horizontally through 42 PC cooling fans, acting as divider-modulators, to turn the light signals into rhythmic impulses. Seven photo sensors on the end monitor the presence or absence of light, while four Arduino Mega boards control the system. (more…)

Build an LED game system with Arduino and a picture frame

Monday, June 20th, 2016

The LEDmePlay is an open-source DIY gaming console powered by an Arduino Mega. Games are displayed on a 32 x 32 RGB LED matrix housed inside an IKEA picture frame, and played using any C64-compatible joystick from the ‘80s. LEDmePlay supports several games, each of which are downloadable for free online, and Makers are encouraged to develop their own as well.


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