Archive for the ‘AVR’ Category

Massimo Introduces Arduino Leonardo

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

In this video Massimo explains the Arduino Leonardo, talking about its differences with Arduino UNO and playing around with its mouse & keyboard features.

If you want to have a closer look to the latest arrival in the Arduino Family click here, if you want to follow Massimo’s project click here. Arduino Leonardo comes in two different flavours: with headers and without headers.

More Lufa Hacks: Keyboard, Mouse, and MIDI.

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011

[Darran] played around LUFA firmwares on the Arduino UNO and Arduino 2560. It seems now LUFA hacking is getting more and more common among Arduino users.

I’ve published the source, hex files, and sample sketches for Keyboard HID, Mouse HID, and USB MIDI drivers for the UNO and Mega2560 on http://hunt.net.nz/users/darran.

The LUFA project has made this fairly easy to do which is great, the only drawback is the limitation of only 4KB of flash space for the driver in the atmega8u2.

via [hunt.net]

HIDUINO: Arduino talking MIDI

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Some time ago [ant.b]  from the Arduino Forum manage to reflash the Atmega8u with other LUFA Firmwares. [Dimitri Diakopoulos] has recently developed a similar approach for his HIDUINO project. Very good explanation & references.  Diakopoulos succeded to make Arduino show up as a MIDI Device:

LUFA powers the HIDUINO project in that it handles most of the low-level USB-HID implementation while exposing an API for developing other HID-compliant devices like MIDI.

The USB-HID specification has a specific type for MIDI input and MIDI output, which nearly all commercial musical controllers on the market use for class-compliant (driverless!) MIDI I/O.

Check out guide for ISP flashing, on the project page hosted on googleCode.

via [HackADay], source [HIDUINO]

 

Samsa II, The Hexapod

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

[pabloxid] shared an Hexapod project on the forum based on an Arduino MEGA 1280 and 18 Dynamixel AX-12 motors:

SAMSA is based on the Wiring board, with an ATmega128 microcontroller, and SAMSA II on the Arduino Mega, with an ATmega1280. Both are pretty similar, tough the ATmega1280 has 8 KB SRAM, twice the ATmega128. For SAMSA II the Arduino IDE was not used. The software was written directly in C++, using some libraries from both Arduino and Wiring.

SAMSA II has also two additional microcontrollers. One is an old Arduino Mini (ATmega168) located in the head, tasked with handling the sensors. The other is an ATmega8 and is integrated in the display. The firmware in the display was replaced with another one, freeing the main microcontroller from handling the display pixel by pixel, storing the frame buffer, etc.

The head’s microcontroller is responsible for sampling, filtering and processing sensor’s data. The data from the Sharp distance sensor and the lateral IR sensors are combined in a single “super smart distance sensor”. This microcontroller also decodes the data coming from the 38 KHz IR receiver, used for the Remote Control.

These two additional microcontrollers further reduce the load on the main microcontroller, allowing for more sophisticated behaviours.

(more…)

Must-See Beginner Tutorials For Arduino

Wednesday, March 9th, 2011

[Jeremy] made ten Tutorials about Arduino worth our “All Stars” category. He talks about different themes: Blinking Leds [Intro & #2], Electrical Engineering  [#3],  Analog Inputs [#4], Motors & Transistors [#5], Serial Communication & Processing [#6], I2C & Processing [#7], SPI Interfaces [#8], Wireless Communication [#9] and Interrupts [#10].

Thanks to a generous sponsorship from element14, I’m putting together a tutorial series on using the arduino microcontroller platform!  The arduino is a platform that I’ve done several projects with, and I think it is the best possible way for beginners to get acquainted with electronics.  This tutorial series will be aimed at beginner users, but I’m hoping to keep it going with some more advanced topics a few episodes into the future.

thanks Jeremy! ++

via [JeremyBlum] [Element14]

Hacking Christmas Lights

Friday, December 10th, 2010

We are all waiting for consumer electronics producers to sell hacking-friendly, repairable products.

While we wait we can all enjoy [Darco] Christmas Lights Hack. He reverse engineered the leds protocol and the remote control of the GE Color Effects G-35.

The protocol on the data line is simple and self-clocked. Here are the low-level details:

  • Idle bus state: Low
  • Start Bit: High for 10µSeconds
  • 0 Bit: Low for 10µSeconds, High for 20µSeconds
  • 1 Bit: Low for 20µSeconds, High for 10µSeconds
  • Minimum quiet-time between frames: 30µSeconds

Each frame is 26 bits long and has the following format:

  • Start bit
  • 6-Bit Bulb Address, MSB first
  • 8-Bit Brightness, MSB first
  • 4-Bit Blue, MSB first
  • 4-Bit Green, MSB first
  • 4-Bit Red, MSB first

From this we can see that we have a color depth of 12 bits. Not terribly great, but this should still be plenty for our purposes. What is interesting is the Brightness field. This field acts a bit like a multiplier and enables smooth fade-ins and fade-outs.

Merry Hacking Christmas!

via [Deep Darc] code [Here]

Make Your Own Solenoids And Play XylophoneMake Your Own Solenoids And Play XylophoneMake Your Own Solenoids And Play Xylophone

Friday, December 3rd, 2010

 

[Humberto Evans] and the team at Nerd Kits posted a nice Christmas project about making a xylophone and solenoids triggered by a microcontroller (they share the project).

We’re unlikely to replicate this machining process but the solenoids are another story all together. Starting at about 3:30 you can learn about designing, building, and using these little marvels. They’re basically an electromagnetic cuff with a metal slug in the middle. The solenoid seen above uses a body milled from HDPE and wrapped with magnet wire. The slug in the center is steel, with a few rare-earth magnets at the top. When you run current through the coil it repulses the magnets on the slug, witch then strikes the xylophone key. Using a MOSFET and a protection diode, actuating them is as simple as sending a digital high from your microcontroller of choice.

Via [HackADay] source [NerdKits]

 

 

[Humberto Evans] and the team at Nerd Kits posted a nice Christmas project about making a xylophone and solenoids triggered by a microcontroller (they share the project).

We’re unlikely to replicate this machining process but the solenoids are another story all together. Starting at about 3:30 you can learn about designing, building, and using these little marvels. They’re basically an electromagnetic cuff with a metal slug in the middle. The solenoid seen above uses a body milled from HDPE and wrapped with magnet wire. The slug in the center is steel, with a few rare-earth magnets at the top. When you run current through the coil it repulses the magnets on the slug, witch then strikes the xylophone key. Using a MOSFET and a protection diode, actuating them is as simple as sending a digital high from your microcontroller of choice.

Via [HackADay] source [NerdKits]

 

[Humberto Evans] and the team at Nerd Kits posted a nice Christmas project about making a xylophone and solenoids triggered by a microcontroller (they share the project).

We’re unlikely to replicate this machining process but the solenoids are another story all together. Starting at about 3:30 you can learn about designing, building, and using these little marvels. They’re basically an electromagnetic cuff with a metal slug in the middle. The solenoid seen above uses a body milled from HDPE and wrapped with magnet wire. The slug in the center is steel, with a few rare-earth magnets at the top. When you run current through the coil it repulses the magnets on the slug, witch then strikes the xylophone key. Using a MOSFET and a protection diode, actuating them is as simple as sending a digital high from your microcontroller of choice.

Via [HackADay] source [NerdKits]

 

Burn bootloader for Arduino Duemilanove

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

[James Wilson] knows how to play the game, and share with us a very useful guide using avrdude 5.10 (on Ubuntu 9.10).

This is using a new Arduino Duemilanove board with a regular Atmega328p, with no bootloader. I wanted to do the BitBang mode, since I didn’t want to get or make anything else, and the ArduinoISP, I didn’t have access to another Arduino. So I pieced together 3 different guides, I finally got it working.

via [James Wilson]