Archive for the ‘Android’ Category

DIY Air Quality Sensing from HabitatMap and Sonoma Tech

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

 

High-precision air quality monitors are normally very expensive, but Tim Dye of Sonoma Technology is on a mission to change that.  He’s been working with Michael Heimbinder and habitatmap.org to create a low-cost sensor system that when designed properly and integrated into a software platforms can provide valid data.

AirCasting is a platform for recording, mapping, and sharing health and environmental data using Arduino and Android. It combines an Arduino with a set of sensors for air quality measurement; temperature, humidity, and carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and particulate matter. The system combines the sensors using an Arduino Uno and then sends the data to an Android app using Bluetooth. The plans are all open for modification, so you can add your own sensors as needed. A heart rate monitor and an LED vest can also be linked to the AirCasting app, providing a complete the system for realtime, wearable feedback of your body’s reaction to the environmental air quality.

There are many DIY air quality measurement projects online, but most of them are not calibrated against known standards or professional equipment. But Dye and his colleagues have tested the AirCasting particulate matter sensors against the same equipment Sonoma Technology uses for precise measurement, and they’ve gotten surprisingly good results. Correctly constructed and deployed, the AirCasting shows promise as a low-cost alternative to complement the expensive high-end air monitors.

AirCasting is a collaboration between many groups:  Michael Heimbinder of habitatmap.org manages the project, and Tim Dye of Sonoma Technology consults on design, data evaluation, and field deployment; Dr. Iem Heng and Raymond Yap of the City Tech Mechatronics Technology Center designed and built the hardware; Dr. Andy Zhang designed and built the monitor casings; Valentine Leung designed and built the LED garments, and Brooke Singer has helped guided the project with a mind towards interactivity and public engagement.

The data from your AirCasting air monitor can be uploaded to the AirCasting database, which aggregates data from all AirCasting contributors, or can be sent to your own database and all the code for the project is open source and available through GitHub

The website AirCasting.org provides links to all the software and hardware plans.

Portable and cloud-based heart rate tracker

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

In his blog, Charalampos describes his experience with SeeedStudio’s Grove Ear-clip Heart Rate sensor and Cosm (former Pachube) cloud service. The employed sensor is quite cheap and can detect heart pulses from the ear lobe, by measuring the infra-red light reflected by the tissue and by checking for intensity variations.

By connecting this sensor with an ADK board and, in turn, with an Android smartphone, Charalampos implemented a portable heart-rate tracker, which is used to send the recorded data to Cosm cloud service.

For more information and sample code, see here.

[Via: Building Internet of Things]

 

 

Android Open 2011: Massimo Banzi, "Arduino & Android, Infinite Possibilities"

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

Nice Video of Massimo‘s talk at Android Open 2011.

via [O'Reilly Media]

Android Open 2011: Massimo Banzi, “Arduino & Android, Infinite Possibilities”

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

Nice Video of Massimo‘s talk at Android Open 2011.

via [O'Reilly Media]

Android Dev Kit On The Ben Heck Show

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011

The Ben Heck Show, the DIY format on Revision3, explains and uses the Android Development Kit.

On this weeks The Ben Heck Show, Ben jumps right in to using the Android Accessory Development Kit and gets started on building a Baby Rocker that simulates vehicle motion from logged Android sensor data.

It’s amazing to see different efforts in building detailed instructions in using the board and the way this Arduino-to-Android device is changing the design for apps and physical interfaces. For more info check our ADK LABs page.

via [Make] [r/Android] source [tbhs/r3]

 

ADK + Android Hacks in Yahoo Open Hack in Bangalore

Monday, July 25th, 2011

Hacking days  upcoming in Bangalore, India, for Yahoo HackDay 2011. Have a look at the schedule of the event, as well as the Hardware Hacks Wiki. We expect Arduino ADK + Android hacks to rule the scene!

[sudar] (is giving) a talk on Arduino and Android ADK and will be demoing some of the hacks which I have created using them. If this hasn’t convinced you, then there is more. Yahoo is also going to sponsor 50% price for the hardware that you need for hacking. Yes, you read it right again. We have arranged this offer with 9 Circuits.  Head over to the Open hackday wiki to get more details about it.

via [Sudar's Blog] source  [OpenHack India 2011]

 

Arduino Ethernet, ADK Available for purchase

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

 

This week we are releasing a few new products and services. We begin with the Arduino Ethernet and the Arduino Mega ADK.

The Arduino Ethernet combines a regular Arduino board with the Ethernet Shield into a single board designed to power your internet of things projects. It has the ability (if fitted with an optional module) to be powered directly from the ethernet cable using a standard called “Power over Ethernet“,  this makes ideal for permanent installations in buildings and similar structures.

For example, prototypes of the board have been installed and have been operating for over a year at the “Campari Gallery” museum in Milan Italy relaying sensor data via OSC to video players and other interactive installations with amazing reliability.

You can use any FTDI compatible cable or module to program it. For this purpose we are also releasing a new USB2Serial module that is based on the same circuit that’s used in the Arduino UNO, hacking the firmware on the atmega8u2 will allow you to make amazing stuff with this cheap module.

The Arduino Mega ADK is an exciting new addition to the lineup. Google recently released an Arduino-derived open source accessory development kit (ADK) for Android phones and tablets. This is our take on the platform.

It’s essentially an Arduino Mega 2560 with the addition of a USB Host chip that communicates with the phone and a beefy power supply (the board needs to be able to charge the phone). The communication is implemented using Oleg Mazurov’s USB Host library.

The ADK Sensor Kit makes it incredibly simple to develop with the ADK because there is no need to know anything about electronics, small modular sensors and actuators plug on top of the Mega ADK letting you create protoypes or robust installations in minutes!

Later this week we’ll release a few code examples that will make it very easy for anyone to build Android accessories with Arduino.

We hope you enjoy our new creations.

Tutorial: Arduino UNO + Google's ADK

Monday, May 30th, 2011

[Alex TC] from [Bricogeek] posted a tutorial about how to interface Arduino and Android replacing the ADK shield by Google with commonc sensors and actuators.

[few days ago] ADK  was presented on Google’s blog, a platform that enables communication between Android and Arduino. The downside was that the development kit costs around 300 €.

Today we bring you a scoop. After seeing different people online who managed to run the ADK on  Arduino with a USB Host Shield controlling a servo or LED, we intend to play all the devices included in the kit but in our BricoGeek DIY version, with the products we have available in the store.

via [bricogeek]

Tutorial: Arduino UNO + Google’s ADK

Monday, May 30th, 2011

[Alex TC] from [Bricogeek] posted a tutorial about how to interface Arduino and Android replacing the ADK shield by Google with commonc sensors and actuators.

[few days ago] ADK  was presented on Google’s blog, a platform that enables communication between Android and Arduino. The downside was that the development kit costs around 300 €.

Today we bring you a scoop. After seeing different people online who managed to run the ADK on  Arduino with a USB Host Shield controlling a servo or LED, we intend to play all the devices included in the kit but in our BricoGeek DIY version, with the products we have available in the store.

via [bricogeek]

Google Launches Android Open Accessory Development Kit Based On Arduino

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

As seen in the streaming of Google IO 2011, physical computing and interactive enviroments are one of the main topics opening the conference. The Android Open Accessory Kit is going to allow Android related devices receive data from different sensors (just via USB, for now).

The Android Open Accessory Development Kit (ADK) provides an implementation of an Android USB accessory that is based on the Arduino open source electronics prototyping platform, the accessory’s hardware design files, code that implements the accessory’s firmware, and the Android application that interacts with the accessory. The hardware design files and code are contained in the ADK package download.

The board is  based on the Arduino Mega2560 and Circuits@Home USB Host Shield designs, since it communicates to the phone in its “accessory” mode. You can get the custom library / firmware to make it run & test with the shield pictured on top.

more info on the [Android Developer site], via [engadget] source [Google IO]