Archive for the ‘Junk’ Category

Arduino ADK spices up phones

Friday, September 9th, 2011

 

What better option than Android arduino, could be used when we think of hacking phones and and interfacing them with the sensors?

As a member of illutron, Mads Høbye – MEDEA PhD student in interaction design – was asked by SonyEricsson to challenge the more conventional usage of mobile technology, by exploring alternative usage scenarios. He called in a combination of artists, geeks and tinkerers for a four day workshop.

 

The Android platform proved to be a great stepping stone in that direction. During the workshop we managed to use the phones in multiple ways, by taking advantage of the embedded technologies like GPS, Compass, Wifi, GSM/3, Accelerometers, touch screen and connecting them to the Arduino platform.The compressed format of the workshop proved to a fruitful for revealing new openings and possibilities – pushing the boundaries of the normal perception of what constitutes a phone and how it should be used. From a research-through-design perspective, the resulting prototypes work as conversation pieces around what constitutes material media and how we can design position aware devices that are constantly connected to each other.

 

Via:[Medea]

Floppy DrawBot Makes Cool Patterns

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

Stuart and I wanted to design a project that would be a good introduction to upcycling electronics, robotics, arduino, art with maths/code. We came up with a drawing robot based on an old floppy drive.

made your own [instructables] via Matthew Venn & Sturat Childs @ [Bristol Hackerspace]

Displaying on Paper – Thermal Printer + Arduino

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

Guys at [bildr] wrote a nice tutorial on how to control & use a thermal printer with Arduino.

Outputting data can be extremely useful, and typically when we look at doing this, it is either to the Arduino’s serial terminal, or to some sort of display. But what about making physical copies of the data? (…) If you dont know about thermal printers, they are most often the printers your store’s receipts are printed on. The reason for this is that they dont use ink, or use a cartridge of any sort. The paper it prints on turns black when heated. So this printer simply applies heat where another printer would apply ink.

via [bildr]

Arduino Tree-Climbing Robot As The First Challenge

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

[Tecnochicken] has challeneged his arduino and robotic skills in developing a tree-climbing robot based on a L298 H-Bridge Motor Driver and some design time in Sketchup.

After I got comfortable programming and building with an Arduino, I decided to build a robot.  I did not have any particular type in mind, so I wracked my brain (and the internet) for cool robot ideas.  Eventually, somehow the idea popped into my head to build a robot that could climb trees.  At first I dismissed the idea as beyond my skill level, but after further thought, and some time in Sketchup, I decided to take a shot at the challenge.

Fully explained on [Instructables]

Arduino-Controlled Robot Brings Pointillism Back!

Friday, August 12th, 2011

[Paul Ferragout] realized a strange printer, with an incorporated program to print any image using a time-based algorithm. According to the grey value of a pixel on an image, the felt pen remains in contact with the blotting paper for relative periods of time.

The Arduino-controlled Time Print Machine uses an algorithm to “paint” images — portraits, still lives, you name it — out of nothing but splotches of ink. Equipped with a felt pen and blotting paper, it works like a CNC-milling machine. Program the machine to render a digital image, and the pen starts stabbing at the paper, varying the amount of time it spends on each dot according to the gray value of the respective pixel; the more time allotted, the more the ink bleeds, and the thicker the dot.

The resulting images can take up to 34 hours to print and look like bad photocopies, each totally unique. We’re not sure whether to think of the Time Print Machine as the world’s least-efficient printer or the world’s most-efficient Pointillist painter. The one thing we know is this: The machine is weirdly hypnotic. We could watch that thing drop ink all afternoon

via [FastCoDesign] source [Paul Ferrabout]

DIY Fabric Speakers

Sunday, February 27th, 2011

Interesting DIY fabric speakers from Hannah Perner-Wilson:

Making a speaker is much easier than you’ve ever imagined, and what you need to prepare is merely: textile (or paper), conductive tape and some strong magnets. Try this one made by Hannah Perner-Wilson and you’ll find it quite impressive.

UPDATE: as Tara commented below, you can have more information about Hannah’s work on her website Kobakant.at

via [innewidea]

DIY Feminism at Trasmediale 11: Interview With MzBaltazar

Thursday, February 10th, 2011

I’ve spent part of last week walking around Trasmediale 11 in Berlin, attending to workshops and conferences or simply having a good time with some firends (it’s what we call “press activities”…).

One of the oddiest images I’ll keep from this exprerience it has been well pictured in the photo above (thanks to Julien Dorra for sending it): 15 women hacking electronics devices around a table, creating interactive objects for fun. That’s what the DIY Feminism Workshop held by MzBaltazar was about.

But there’s more.

(more…)

Accordion Playing Midi Under 100$

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

Amazing Accordion sending MIDI under 100$ (instead of 6,699.00$), as [Dmitry Yegorenkov] shares on Arduino Forum and published on GitHub.

I like to play accordion & have a dog. People say dogs are singing with squeezeboxes and some people find it funny. Not for me. I know that my pet hears note harmonics much better then me & suffers from high pitches very much. I could not really practice at home just because of humanennes. That sucks. I like to play accordion. Programmers see cycle here. Let’s get out.

THIS IS IT.
It plays to headphones, produces MIDI output, etc. etc. It costs $6,699.00 on e-bay (buy now offer) on November 17, 2010. In the US I can buy Peugeot Partner for the same price. In Ukraine where i live both are 1/2 times more expensive. For that money i’ll get beautiful device to practice at home and no service centers available within 400Km radius. Weird.

Code and Schematics-ready on [Accordion Mega's Github]

Seg..Stick – A Stick-Controlled, Arduino-Based Segway

Sunday, December 26th, 2010

[scolton] made a nice self-balaced vehicle based on two DeWalt cordless drills and an Arduino Nano:

Segstick is a self-balancing…well, literally some kind of broomstick I found in the MITERS workshop. It is powered direct by two DeWalt cordless drills chucked to two 6″ wheels. The controller is an Arduino. Additional supporting devices include an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from Sparkfun and two motor drivers from Pololu .

see the compete how-to on [Instructables]

Hacking Christmas Lights

Friday, December 10th, 2010

We are all waiting for consumer electronics producers to sell hacking-friendly, repairable products.

While we wait we can all enjoy [Darco] Christmas Lights Hack. He reverse engineered the leds protocol and the remote control of the GE Color Effects G-35.

The protocol on the data line is simple and self-clocked. Here are the low-level details:

  • Idle bus state: Low
  • Start Bit: High for 10µSeconds
  • 0 Bit: Low for 10µSeconds, High for 20µSeconds
  • 1 Bit: Low for 20µSeconds, High for 10µSeconds
  • Minimum quiet-time between frames: 30µSeconds

Each frame is 26 bits long and has the following format:

  • Start bit
  • 6-Bit Bulb Address, MSB first
  • 8-Bit Brightness, MSB first
  • 4-Bit Blue, MSB first
  • 4-Bit Green, MSB first
  • 4-Bit Red, MSB first

From this we can see that we have a color depth of 12 bits. Not terribly great, but this should still be plenty for our purposes. What is interesting is the Brightness field. This field acts a bit like a multiplier and enables smooth fade-ins and fade-outs.

Merry Hacking Christmas!

via [Deep Darc] code [Here]