Archive for the ‘Machine Hacks’ Category

An Arduino-enhanced espresso machine: the “Naked Espresso”

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Reborn is an australian digital creative agency whose mission is to design smart and innovative ideas.
Among their works, a very nice one regards a hack consisting in the re-engineering of a sofisticated espresso machine, to show its peculiar features in the process of coffee making.
By means of an Arduino board, the team can collect real-time information such as flow rate, temperature and pressure; then, a Processing sketch graphically presents this data to the user in an artistic fashion.
Finally, each cup of coffee made this way is decorated with an artwork summarizing this information in its own “personal identity”.
More information can be found here.

[Via: The Naked Espresso]

An Arduino-enhanced espresso machine: the "Naked Espresso"

Friday, September 14th, 2012

Reborn is an australian digital creative agency whose mission is to design smart and innovative ideas.
Among their works, a very nice one regards a hack consisting in the re-engineering of a sofisticated espresso machine, to show its peculiar features in the process of coffee making.
By means of an Arduino board, the team can collect real-time information such as flow rate, temperature and pressure; then, a Processing sketch graphically presents this data to the user in an artistic fashion.
Finally, each cup of coffee made this way is decorated with an artwork summarizing this information in its own “personal identity”.
More information can be found here.

[Via: The Naked Espresso]

An IBM Selectric II wishes to be a teletype

Friday, June 15th, 2012

In his blog, Marc from Robot Dialogs presents a very nice hack involving a IBM Selectric II typewriter: by means of an Arduino board and several solenoids, the typewriter can be successfully connected to a computer to emulate a vintage teletype.

The complete story can be found here, together with several videos about its development.

[Via: Hack A Day]

Indoor air quality mapping

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

PLOTS guys propose an interesting way to measure the quality of the air for indoor environments, by hacking a second-hand Roomba robot (an autonomous vacuum cleaner).

These robots are programmed to randomly move inside rooms to clean up the floor, so by adding a simple air quality sensor on top of one of them, it is possible to easily implement a sort of “random walker” that will sense for us the presence of gases (volatile organic chemicals, VOCs), such as NH3, alcohol, CO2 and so forth.

To keep track of the air quality measurements, the authors equipped the so hacked Roomba with an RGB led, whose color can be changed according to the air sample. By taking a long exposure picture of the room where the robot was roaming in, they could determine the areas where a high concentration of VOCs was present.

The complete description of the project can be found on the PLOTS’ website, while here you may find a short video about it:

PLOTS guys are also working on a different approach to air sensing, which does not make use of a Roomba robot but uses a hamster ball, instead. Further details can be found here.

[Via: Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science]

SpamPoetry (or how to recycle spam)

Friday, May 18th, 2012

IMG_2214

Everyday, a lot of spam inevitably arrives to our mailboxes, forcing us to lose time in discerning fake emails from good ones, so everyone agrees on saying that spam is frustrating and completely useless.

This is almost true, since Varvara Guljajeva and Mar Canet Sola have taken advantage of spam coming from the Internet (more specifically, those messages “donated” by Eindhoven people) to make a very creative art project: first, they have recycled spam to algoritmically create poetry and, then, they have sent the result to a properly Arduino-hacked knitting machine (Arduino has been used to emulate the typing of the commands required to load the pattern).

From the authors:

Concerning the concept, we are interested in bringing together digital culture and traditional handicraft. To be more specific, the idea is to experiment with the form and meaning of SPAM. We turn SPAM into a romantic, funny or even sarcastic poetry and present it in unusual tangible form as knitted garment. To be more specific, we call final result dysfunctional wearable, because it reminds a sweater but is not really a one. Like SPAM, our dysfunctional wearable does not have a purpose.

The result is really impressive and it has been presented at two exhibitions, at Eindhoven and Malmö. Several pictures of the events can be found here. More information about the project can be found at Mar and Varvara‘s homepages.

[Via: Mar's Homepage and Varvara's Homepage]

Arduino guitar pedal

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2012

For the crazy music makes, who keep searching to give new effects to music, we have a new Arduino based guitar pedal by Kyle McDonald and modified by Randfo.

The complete instructions with part list can be got from here.

[Via: Instructables]

A device to read your mind – or not?

Monday, November 14th, 2011

The latest member of the AI family, who is reaching out to users is the much talked about Siri. What if she started executing commands using just thoughts rather than words?

A project by Ollie and Josh, which everyone is talking about, called the Project Black Mirror is gaining a lot of interest among the believers and skeptics alike.

One of the comments reads as:

“Quick question? How are you amplifying the EEG signals before feeding them into the arduino? I ask because all of the neuroscience researchers I’ve talked to say you need an amplifier roughly the size of a VCR to bring the signals up to levels at which they can be analyzed. If you’ve found a way to just plug wires from the electrode pads into the analog inputs on an arduino that would be quite the breakthrough. Also is there any chance you’d be willing to demo your code for separating the brain activity on the EEG from noise created by environmental effects and muscle movements since I’m sure you know that something as small as an eye blink creates an electrical impulse at the scalp which dwarfs the majority of the brain’s electrical signals when measured through the skull. “

Unlike the other post that we made about brain-controlled devices using  an Emotiv headset, this one claims to recognize different words.

Another report of such a nature, comes from abcnews.go.com :

They outfitted volunteers with caps with EEG sensors, and asked them to steer a helicopter on a computer screen through a series of randomly generated rings that appeared on the screen ahead of it. There were no hand controls, no joysticks. They could only try to will the helicopter forward with their minds.

Citing an example of an experiment by Dr. Bin He of the University of Minnesota and his team.

Although it would be nice to observe such a project see the daylight, but for now, the possibility seems a little far away.

Prologue : Quoted from their blog:

Also today we have got the go ahead form kickstarter,  to get  project black mirror up there,  now all we need to do is set up an US business.. eeek ! ( anyone know how to set up a business in the US ?)

(PS: Verdict postponed till the Kickstarter program ends ;))

 

Sources: [ProjectBlackMirror, Emotiv, 26mag.com, intomobile.com, interaxon.ca, abcnews.go.com ]

 

Arduino Circuit Bending Workshop in Torino

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Il prossimo week-end a Torino si terrà un workshop gratuito di Arduino (un kit opzionale potrà essere comprato per partecipare qualora non disponeste dei materiali elencati) sul circuit bending e la generazione di suoni con la scheda.

Un workshop di tre giorni per smontare riciclare e far suonare vecchi strumenti elettronici, creare una digital toys orchesta e sfilare in parata a Paratissima.

Il circuit Bending è una pratica molto diffusa tra gli sperimentatori musicali. Soprattutto sulla scena della musica elettronica sono sempre più frequenti gli artisti che si creano controller o addirittura strumenti musicali personalizzati.

Nel workshop saranno coinvolte diverse discipline: toy hacking, riciclo elettronico, elettronica di base, sintesi sonora, programmazione ad oggetti e faremo largo uso di Arduino per comandare i nuovi strumenti.

Il workshop è gratuito, a carico dei partecipanti il costo dei materiali e l’acquisto del kit-workshop.
maggiori informazioni quì!

Per partecipare registrati qui.

via [FablabItalia]

Retro Pinball Clock Hack

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

[Alan Amon] posted a cool vintage hack on Instructables, adding GPS-based clock funcionalities to a Bally Wizard pinball.

Pinball machine will automatically power up at the preset time each day and then resets to display the current time, the year, the time the alarm is set for and the date month/day. Then as long as the GPS has a signal the time will update once a minute for the rest of the day.  At the time you would like to go to bed the Arduino will cut power to the game and it will remain off until the alarm time. Should you have a power failure in the night the machine will not lose it’s settings. If power is restored prior to the alarm time the machine will wake up as normal, otherwise the machine will wake up once power is restored.

If the game is powered on because it is not yet bed time and it is after the alarm time then at 12am, 1am or 1pm the game will do a full reset. This makes sure the clock hasn’t gotten off due to a stuck score reel, keeps the time in a 12 hour format and keeps the date display up to date.

Have a look at the “cool features” and “coolest features” in the instructables article

via [PCWorld] source [Instructables]

Arduino Based KENBAK Computer

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

Kenbak  computer (claimed to be one of the first personal computer – 1971) has come back from the shadows of the past.

I’d been thinking for a while that emulating an old-school switches-and-lamps computer would be a fun Arduino project, but had stalled looking at things like the Altair 8800 with its 30+ lights and 20+ switches. However, when I stumbled upon the Kenbak I thought it was something I could pull off as my first real Arduino project. Naturally I called it the KENBAK-uino
This is the end-product, it can be programmed via the buttons on the front panel and show outputs on the LEDs. It’s a faithful emulation of the original CPU but with a few enhancements thrown in like pre-loaded sample programs and access to a real time clock.

via flickr (set), (videos) (code).