Archive for the ‘Audio’ Category

Arduino Yún with sound the supereasy way

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Arduino Yún

 

 

During Codemotion Milano Stefano had a talk with Federico Vanzati from Officine Arduino on how to use a supercheap USB Audio card with Arduino Yún and test the full audio capabilities with zero effort, external libraries or mp3 shields.

After some days he came out with a quick tutorial that you can check out here (includes code!).

 

 

MakerLab reviews the Arduino Starter Kit

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

When we released the Arduino Kit, we knew that we are equiping the closet-wannabe-makers to start planning for world domination. Now it has the stamp of approval from MakerLab too!

Make Noise With The New Arduino Kit is a project by Alessandro Contini (@CNTLSN) and Alberto Massa (@nkint)

The above video explores the basic components of the kit and things that a new-maker would want to start with, including a light controlled theramin, and by theramin, I really mean exploring every possibe way to make impressive noises from one simple experiment.

Sounds fun? Do write to us, what you made out of your starter kit. We may feature you next ;)

Via:[MakerLab]

Arduino Vocal Effects Box

Friday, September 21st, 2012

Have you ever wished to build a box to distort and pitch your voice? Here we go.

Amanda Ghassaei has published an inspiring Instructable to guide you in building an Arduino Vocal Effects Box.

Arduino vocal effect box

It samples an incoming microphone signal at a rate of about 40kHz, manipulates the audio digitally, and then outputs 8 bit audio at a rate of about 40kHz. Here you can hear a sample of the sounds that can be obtained.

I highly recommend to follow Amanda’s website because it seems that she is working on other experiments with digital signal processing using Arduino.

 

 

Skube, a tangible radio

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Skube is a music player that allows you to discover and share music.

There are two modes, Playlist and Discovery. Playlist plays the tracks on your Skube, while Discovery looks for tracks similar to the ones on your Skube so you can discover new music that still fits your taste. When Skubes are connected together, they act as one player that shuffles between all the playlists. You can control the system as a whole using any Skube.

The interface is designed to be intuitive and tangible. Flipping the Skube changes the modes, tapping will play or skip songs and flipping a Skube on its front face will turn it off.

The Skube is a fully functional device, not just a concept. It use a combination of Arduino, Max/MSP and an XBee wireless network.

This project was made by Andrew Nip, Ruben van der Vleuten, Malthe Borch, and Andrew Spitz. It was part of the Tangible User Interface module at CIID ran by Vinay Venkatraman, David Cuartielles, Richard Shed, and Tomek Ness.

You can read the details and see the inner workings of the Skube here.

Via:[Create Digital Music]

 

Glitchbox – audio sequencing music instrument

Wednesday, August 1st, 2012

Amanda Ghassaei has published on her website an interesting project: the Glitchbox.

This instrument can do two different things:
-it can be used as a standalone audio device, with the audio data stored in the arduino’s flash memory
-it can also be used to sequence MIDI through a usb connection to your computer

The glitchbox is an electronic instrument used for live audio sequencing. Each of its nine buttons is linked to an audio file stored in its memory, new audio files may be loaded onto the instrument via USB. A switch on top allows the user to play, record, and loop a sequence of audio. Once recorded, additional audio may be recorded and automatically looped on top of an existing sequence. Old sequences can be cleared from the instrument’s memory and replaced with new sequences live. Two knobs on top of the instrument control volume and tempo, and a second switch mutes and unmutes recorded sequences.

There is also a detailed  instructable with all the information needed.

Via:[Little Bird Electronic]

 

Guitar effects pedal with Pure data and Arduino

Thursday, July 26th, 2012

Pierre Massat is sharing his experience in building a guitar multi-effect on his blog. The project is based on a pedal built hooked up to an Arduino Uno and a PC running Pure Data.

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Minimal Arduino-based wavetable synth

Friday, May 25th, 2012

This instructable shows you how to create a very simple Arduino-based sequencer with nice features:

Multiple synthesizer projects has been done for the Arduino, but few has been able to utilize the full power of the Arduino processor. DZL from GeekPhysical wrote a 4 voice wavetable synthesizer that is one of more advanced software based synths for the Arduino.  It has wavetables included (sine, saw, square and triangle) and envelopes to create beats.

Implementation instructions can be found here, while the Arduino code can be obtained from GitHub.

[Via: Instructables]

Arduino-based theremin

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Theremin is one of the most exiting musical instruments ever made, mainly because of its “quite odd” playing method. Infact, its working principle is based on near-filed coupling between the hands of the theremin player and two metal antennas, used to determine the pitch of a variable-frequency oscillator and to adjust the volume of the output signal, respectively.
Several theremin implementation are possible, such as the “original” analog one (based on the mixing of two sine waves originated by a fixed-frequency oscillator and a variable-frequency one) and those based on digital techniques.
LabIII guys implemented a nice and simple Arduino theremin module, based on a TTL LC-type oscillator, usable not only to play electronic music, but also as a generic sensing-device, for example to control motors and/or to work with Processing, Max etc.
The detailed description of the project, together with schematics and source code, can be found here.

 

[Via: elektor.it]

Alarma DIY con Módulo 3G, Cámara, Ultrasonidos, Teclado Matricial & Led RGB

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

Arduteka lanza su último tutorial!

En él nos descubre el nuevo módulo 3G para Arduino de Cooking Hacks con el que podremos construir una divertida alarma que nos enviará la foto de nuestro intruso directamente a nuestro correo, además de avisarnos por un mensaje sms a nuestro teléfono móvil sin necesidad de tener conectado nuestro Arduino a internet constantemente, pues lo hace todo a través de la red móvil.

Vamos a construirnos una alarma totalmente casera, a través del sensor de ultrasonidos, escanearemos continuamente el espacio situado enfrente suyo con un radio aproximado de 30º, cuando algún objeto o persona se sitúe en su campo de actuación a una distancia inferior a la que establezcamos, haremos sonar una alarma, tomaremos una fotografía, el Led RGB que antes estaba verde, pasará a color azul y daremos 10 segundos para poder desactivar la alarma a través de nuestro teclado matricial, si la desactivamos, volverá de nuevo a escanear el campo, pero si no!! Reproducirá un sonido contundente y se dispondrá a mandarnos un sms a nuestro teléfono móvil y la fotografía a nuestro correo electrónico.

Via:[Arduteka]

 

Glitch synthesizer

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

Glitch is a sound and graphic synthesizer, powered by Arduino, fitted in a Tupperware and using few electronic components.

The sounds are generated by Puredata, then sent via OSC protocol to Processing for the graphic display.

The physical inputs are managed by an Arduino board.

 

It has been developed by Thomas Meghe, and here you can find the project page.