Archive for the ‘Arduino’ Category

Cozy Coupe toy car retrofitted with Arduino

Tuesday, January 10th, 2017

Using an Arduino Uno along with an Adafruit Wave Shield, Brent Chapman added more features to the Little Tikes Cozy Coupe including a push-to-start ignition and a sound system.

Although Chapman notes that the Coupe comes with some onboard entertainment options, he thought “his client” deserved something a bit more high-tech. This meant that he retrofitted the classic toy with several pushbuttons that allow him to select a fun song to play and replaced the key with a giant arcade button. He also 3D-printed a replacement hood for the car to cover the electronics, since the original was modified to fit them inside. (more…)

Arduino car alarm honks for help!

Friday, January 6th, 2017

Sure, if you’re going to get a new ride, a model from the twenty-teens would be nice, but for hacking purposes, the simplicity of an older cars makes modification fairly simple. It also makes hot-wiring easy, and as they don’t generally have an alarm system, these vehicles are often targets for theft.

After his friend’s VW Beetle was stolen, Instructables user Ben Schroeder (aka “Pantopush”) decided that he needed to protect his 1966 Bug. So, as any Maker would do, he took matters into his own hands with a GPS-enabled Arduino Uno in a locked glove compartment. (more…)

Turn an Atari 2600 into an electronic drink racer and timer

Friday, January 6th, 2017

The next time you and your friends want to see who can chug beer (or a non-alcoholic beverage for the younger crowd) the fastest, you may want to try building your own Cider Racer 2600–an electronic racing platform and timer for competitive drinking.

Created by YouTuber “MonkeyBOX Entertainment” for an annual Christmas party, the project consists of a broken Atari 2600 retrofitted with an Arduino Mega, two 4-digit 7-segment displays, some LEDs, wires, and other miscellaneous parts. A pair of custom coasters were constructed using force-sensitive resistors, soft springs, rubber actuators, and three layers of CNC-cut materials: acrylic bottom plate, brushed aluminum center, and acrylic spacer to make it level with top of the old gaming console. (more…)

This guitar-playing robot performs American folk music

Thursday, January 5th, 2017

Inspired by a statement written on Woody Guthrie’s guitar, This Machine Kills Fascists (TMKF) is an Arduino Mega-based, guitar-playing robot that performs traditional American folk music on a portable stage. Sheet music with the song lyrics are printed and left on the benches set up in front of the stage, while audience members are encouraged to sing along to the tunes.

Developed by engineer Dustyn Roberts, artist Troy Richards, and designer Ashley Pigford, TMKF is combines the analog tradition of folk music and digital technology of robotics. (more…)

Play digital music on this analog interface

Wednesday, January 4th, 2017

“I’m a big fan of digital music, especially Spotify. The ability to dial-up a much loved song I’ve not heard for ages or discover new music are just some of the benefits I never tire of,” writes UK-based designer Brendan Dawes. “Yet the lack of physicality to this digital medium has always left me wanting. I still own vinyl and a turntable and I love the ritual of physically flicking through what to place on the platter and then wait for the needle to drop on the spinning vinyl.”

To bridge the gap between the digital and analog worlds, Dawes decided to create what he calls the “Plastic Player.” The playful interface features a Raspberry Pi running Pi MusicBox connected to his 50-year-old B&O stereo, and an Arduino Yún with an NFC shield.

(more…)

Build an FM radio with an Arduino and other spare parts

Wednesday, January 4th, 2017

After not having an FM radio to listen to NPR, electrical engineer Kevin Darrah decided to build his own from spare parts.

Like many electronics hackers, Darrah tends to buy random components off of eBay. After all, you may need them at some point, and while cheap, sometimes they take a very long time to arrive. Unlike many of us, however, he actually found a use for several of these items, turning them into an FM radio controlled by an Arduino. (more…)

Make your own 3D-printed sonic tractor beam with Arduino

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

From magic to science, man has long dreamed about being able to manipulate objects from a distance. People have been able to push something using air or even sound waves for a while, but University of Bristol researcher Asier Marzo and colleagues have come up with a 3D-printable device that can not only repel small items, but can also attract them to the source.

It does this using an array of sound transducers arranged in a dome shape at the end of a wand. The acoustic tractor beam is also equipped with an Arduino Nano, a motor controller board, a DC-DC converter, and a LiPo battery, among some other easily accessible components.

Basically, an Arduino will generate 4 half-square signals at 5Vpp 40kHz with different phases. These signals get amplified to 25Vpp by the motor driver and fed into the transducers. A button pad can be used to change the phases so that the particle moves up and down. A battery (7.3V) powers the Arduino and the logic part of the motor driver. A DC-DC converter steps-up the 7.3V to 25V for the motor driver.

(more…)

Measure a magnet’s strength with this DIY Gauss Meter

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017

You may know that a neodymium magnet is more powerful than something you usually find on a refrigerator, but by how much?

Most people, even those willing to harvest magnets from disk drives, accept that some magnets are stronger than others. This, however, wasn’t quite good enough for Anthony Garofalo, who instead converted a prototype voltmeter he made using an Arduino Uno and a tiny OLED screen into something that displays the magnetic, or Gauss level. It also shows whether it’s observing the north or south pole of the magnet, which certainly could be useful in some situations. (more…)

This 3D-printed bionic hand can replace or support a limb

Monday, January 2nd, 2017

3D-printed appendages are, as one might suspect, generally meant for those that are missing a limb. Moreover, there are many other people that might retain partial functionality of a hand, but could still use assistance.

Youbionic’s beautifully 3D-printed, myoelectric prosthesis is envisioned for either application, capable of being controlled by muscle contraction as if it were a real body part.

As seen in the video below, the Youbionic hand can manipulate many different items, including a small box, a water bottle, and a set of keys. Functionality aside, the movement is extremely fluid and the smooth black finish really makes it look great.

The device is currently equipped with an Arduino Micro, servos, various sensors, a battery pack, and a few switches. Even the breadboard appears to be very neat, though one would suspect the final version will use some sort of PCB.

(more…)

RooBee One is an open-source SLA/DLP 3D printer

Monday, January 2nd, 2017

Aldric Negrier, a Portuguese Maker and owner of RepRap Algarve, has created an SLA 3D printer named RooBee One.

Most desktop 3D printers that you’ll see in Makerspaces or advertised for home use drop material onto a bed using a hot extrusion head. The open-source RooBee One, however, employs a DLP projector along with an Arduino Mega to light up each layer in a vat of resin. This causes each layer to solidify, thus making a complete object. You can see this process at around 0:30 in the video below. (more…)

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