Archive for the ‘Arduino’ Category

Give me your number and get a unique micro-noise piece

Thursday, November 5th, 2015


Prankophone  is the new interactive installation by Dmitry Morozov (his amazing projects have been featured on this blog ).  This time he created  a sound object, a hybrid of synthesizer, telephone and logic module:

The main principle of the object’s functioning is as follows: depending on the current mode, the apparatus calls to random or pre-defined recipients and plays them algorithmic melodies created from their phone numbers. The speakers transmit both the synthesized sounds and the sound from answering person. The common sound layer is involving a random recipient who doesn’t suspect anything. The person who answers the phone can’t hear any other sounds except for the synthesized ones.

You can play with it in 4 different modes: (more…)

Making beyond the Wall: get to know chinese makers

Wednesday, November 4th, 2015


Last June Arduino partnered with Seeedstudio to manufacture Genuino boards for the chinese market and during Maker Faire Rome Massimo Banzi took part to an interesting panel to promote  4 chinese delegates from business, education, design and research domains presenting their work and discussing what does it mean to be a maker in China. (in the pic from left to right, Lin, Massimo, Alessio, Jin, Chenille & Flamingo).

The panel titled Making beyond the Wall and moderated by Alessio Jacona tried to address the growing maker movement in China which is not so visible to the European community while the hype of manufacture in Shenzhen, the Chinese Silicon Valley, is gaining more and more international media attention.


Flamingo was the first presenter of the session. Indeed he was also the first person to use Arduino boards in China back in 2007. As an evangelist, he taught physical interactions in China Central Academy of Fine Arts and even started the digital firm K1ND Beijing with Ogilvy China, which focus on interactive design with open source technologies for business projects. (more…)

Better you team up if you want to win the game!

Monday, November 2nd, 2015


Team Game is an interactive installation to reflect about video games and controllers made by Caroline Buttet. It runs on an Arduino Uno or Genuino Uno controlling a flex sensor, a custom made potentiometer, and a light sensor with the help of Unity software and Uniduino plugin:

It’s a simple game in which you need to roll a ball from one side to another of the screen. The trick is, you need some custom controllers to play. And you also need 2 partners that will play with you so that you can progress through the 3 levels. Rather than playing against the others, you will have to team up in order to win!

See the game in action described by Caroline: (more…)

Play with sensors on your Windows 10 devices from an Arduino

Wednesday, October 28th, 2015


At build 2015 Microsoft announced an important collaboration with Arduino. Windows became the first Arduino certified OS and introduced Windows Virtual Shields for Arduino and Windows Remote Arduino able to bridge technologies designed to connect the physical world of Arduino with the Windows ecosystem and computing power. Today on the Windows blog, an update on the topic: (more…)

Installing Libraries and how to write a Library for Arduino

Monday, October 26th, 2015


Libraries are files written in C or C++ which provide sketches with extra functionality, for example the ability to control an LED matrix, read an encoder, connect to a sensor, display, or module, etc. They are very useful to lower the barriers for creating amazing interactive projects and use a wide range of components.  Libraries can be created by everyone and shared with the open source community!

To use an existing library in a sketch you can use the Library Manager (available from IDE version 1.6.2), open the IDE and click to the “Sketch” menu and then Include Library > Manage Libraries and follow the Guide on this page. (more…)

Thanks to all 100k participants: Maker Faire Rome 2015 was great

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015


Last weekend we were in Rome to take part to the third edition of Maker Faire Rome. With more than 100.000 participants, the event confirmed itself as the biggest Maker Faire outside of US. We thank you all for visiting our booth and express your support to community.

On Saturday we had a special announcement to make, Intel and Massimo Banzi were on the main stage presenting the collaboration on the Arduino 101 and Genuino 101:

During the three days makers, designers, kids and parents, and many more visited the Genuino Booth and the Maker Store to see the new Arduino’s sister brand Genuino boards, explore the interactive installations and chat with the Arduino team: (more…)

Increasing citizen’s responses to the haze with Arduino Uno

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015


Once in a while, South East Asia countries such as Singapore and Malaysia suffers from the haze, a fire-related large-scale air pollution problem that occurs regularly. Especially during dry season there are some persisting forest fires in Indonesia that spread to other countries nearby.

In 2015 the haze hit Singapore quite badly, causing schools to close down for one day. That’s why during Hyper Haze Hackathon taking place in Singapore, Tian Lye Teo and Ethan Lee Yong Sheng worked on and presented a low-cost solution based on Arduino Uno to tackle difficulty to communicate haze rising to illiterate elderly in the nation and won second prize ! (more…)

Intel and Banzi just presented Arduino 101 and Genuino 101

Friday, October 16th, 2015


Today during Opening Conference at Maker Faire Rome, Josh Walden Senior Vice President of Intel Corporation and Massimo Banzi, co-founder of Arduino, announced the upcoming release of Arduino 101 (U.S.) and Genuino 101 (outside the U.S.). The board features a 32-bit Intel® Quark™ microcontroller for minimal power consumption, 384 kB of flash memory, 80 kB of SRAM (24kB available for sketches), an integrated DSP sensor hub, Bluetooth* Low Energy radio, and 6-axis combo sensor with accelerometer and gyroscope.

We collaborated with Intel to provide the maker community an affordable learning and development board ideal for entry-level makers and education environments and also the first widely available development board based on the tiny, low-power Intel Curie  module.

Josh Walden explained the new partnership with Arduino:

“Empowering budding entrepreneurs and young students has always been a priority for Intel, and by partnering with Arduino, we are bringing the power of Intel to a new generation of makers. With the advanced features of the Intel Curie module embodied in the Arduino 101 board, young learners as well as developers can now bring to life truly unique, smart and connected creations.”

Massimo Banzi added:

“We worked closely with Intel on the development of this board and are expanding our educational courseware to incorporate the connectivity and advanced features expected by today’s student developers. Through our work with Intel, we’re able to reach a global community of entry-level makers and students with a comprehensive introduction to physical computing and now with a more advanced, powerful technology solution that will help them bring their creative visions to reality.”

Arduino 101 will be available in the first quarter of 2016 for a suggested retail price of US$30 (approximately 27 euros). The Intel-manufactured board will be sold under the Arduino 101 brand in the United States and under the Genuino 101 brand outside the United States. It will be also available through catalog distributors and retailers selling other Intel maker and innovator products such as Amazon, Conrad Electronic, Farnell Element 14, Microcenter, Mouser, Radio Shack, RS Components and SparkFun.

In the meanwhile Arduino 101 will be incorporated into the Creative Technologies in the Classroom (CTC) physical computing curriculum developed and tested by our team and currently deployed in over 300 schools. CTC is the world’s first formal physical computing curriculum for elementary and secondary school classrooms and provides educators with the tools, support and confidence needed to introduce their students to the foundations of programming, electronics and mechanics.

Intel will work closely with us to bring the CTC program to schools across the globe in coming years. As it is introduced to classrooms, Arduino 101 will nurture the next generation of technology industry professionals, entrepreneurs and inventors!

Staging Beckett with 11 motors and Arduino Mega

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015


Happy Days is an installation inspired by the work of the Irish avant-garde novelist Samuel Beckett who wrote the namesake play in two acts in the 60s. Designer and visual artist Irena Kukric created it in collaboration with Canny Sutanto and the aim of exploring narrative in the form of an installation. The five-minute play is staged using ten servo motors and a DC motor with an Arduino Mega and VVVV live programming environment: (more…)

Staying focused with a brain-sensing smart lamp

Friday, October 9th, 2015


Clara is a smart lamp able to respond to your brain waves and subtly adjust your environment. The project, running on Arduino Uno, was created by  Marcelo Mejía Cobo, Belen Tenorio, and Josh Sucher for a class at the School of Visual Arts in NYC (US).


The team worked with the Neurosky MindWave Mobile, a Bluetooth EEG-reading headset in order to wirelessly detect “attention” and map the lamp’s color temperature and speaker volume accordingly: (more…)