Archive for the ‘Social Media’ Category

The Power of Temboo: connect the Yún to 100+ APIs

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

1 - Arduino Temboo schema

(Guest post by Temboo Team)

Ever wish your Arduino could respond to the weather on the other side of the world? Or send you an email to let you know what it’s up to? Upload stuff to your Dropbox account? Or detect if you’re at risk of exposure to toxic chemicals?

Now it can. The Arduino Yún can easily grab all sorts of data and interact with tons of web-based services like Fitbit, Facebook, and Google because every Yún comes loaded with the power of Temboo. Using the Yún’s built in wi-fI capabilities, Temboo makes it easy for the Yún to connect to over 100 Application Programming Interfaces (APIs).

Don’t know what an API is or how to use one? Don’t worry. You don’t need to. With Temboo you can start using APIs with your Yún in minutes. We’ve standardized how to program with them and made sure they play nice with Arduino. (more…)

Today we celebrate 100.000 fans on Facebook: thanks to all of you!

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

100k_fb

Since last February our Arduino page on Facebook has been growing fast and today  we’re celebrating 100.000 fans: if you have an account on it, we invite you to join us and our passionate community on Facebook!

United States, India and Italy are the countries giving more “likes” to the page, but we receive videos, pictures and inquires from all over the world.

100k fans

(more…)

Twitter-powered Digilympics

Monday, July 30th, 2012

The competitors

Samuel Cox, a maker who defined himself as a mix of “design, ideas and technology“, has invented a brand-new competition for digital citizens: Digilympics.

From his website:

2012 is not only the year of the Olympics, but also the launch of the first ever ‘Digilympics’, a twitter-powered race for sporting success where you determine the outcome. Four Lego athletes move down a physical racetrack as fans Tweet their team to move them further towards the finish line.

Starting today (07/18/2012), the Digilympics will be a two-week event as the four teams – UK, US, Canada and Japan – compete for the prestigious Digilympics Gold Medal.

The competition is open to anyone on the web, allowing them to Tweet their team to success using one of four unique Twitter accounts (UK_DigiUS_DigiCA_Digi &JP_Digi). Tweets in support of a particular account will move that country’s contestant physically along a running track.

After each race, the team victories are recorded and contestants go back to the starting line. At the end of the week the team who has won the most races will be given the Gold Medal online at digilympics.com

Under the hood, this funny race is enabled by a Processing sketch that seeks for Twitter replies on each account: a new reply triggers a motor-shield equipped Arduino board, which provides the movement to each athlet.

More information can be found here. And… let’s start twitting for your favourite team! ^^

[Via: Samuel Cox's Digilympics]

Massimo’s Talk at TEDGlobal

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

We are really thrilled to blog Massimo’s delightful talk of yesterday about Arduino and the open hardware movement: TED team chose it to be the first video to be traslated and released for everybody to see.

Enjoy!

 

WISP: a WiFi module for the Internet-of-Things

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

embdSocial™ is an Internet-of-Things (IoT) platform usable to provide communication support to smart objects and devices. embdSocial™ is based on WISP™, an electronic module that can be connected to any microcontroller-equipped device (such as an Arduino board, by means of ad-hoc shield) to exploit several communication services:

Each WISP™ allows real-time bi-directional communication through our secure, globally accessible API. In addition to merely providing internet connectivity, embdSocial™ provides one interface and architecture that simplifies common tasks through the use of plug-ins:

  • Tweeting/receiving @messages
  • Updating Facebook statuses
  • Sending/receiving emails
  • Sending/receiving SMS text messages
  • Manipulating files in your Dropbox

Each WISP™ is equipped with a 802.11 network interface (with support to WEP, WPA and WPA2 protocols) which allows the device to be easily connected with the embdSocial™’s servers; moreover, its configuration is completely web-based.

More information can be found on the embdSocial™ homepage, together with a couple of videos presenting its capabilities.

[Via: HackADay and embdSocial]

How Arduino helped him win a hackathon: Locksmasher

Sunday, June 3rd, 2012

While browsing Hacker News, I came across this interesting account of Andrei Pop [blog, twitter] which tells about how he won a recent Facebook hackathon using an arduino hack.

It is a recent trend that hardware too has entered the hackathon scenario. Here are interesting excerpts from his honest account!

A few months ago 3 friends and I participated in the facebook hackathon at UBC. It was a 36 hour, redbull-fueled affair in which quite a few teams participated. We won. I’m not telling you this story to brag, I want to share with you what I learned. In all honesty, I was shocked we won, but I think that sticking to a couple of principles helped:

1. Don’t compete with your second best arsenal

2. Solve a real problem

3. Breadth instead of depth can pay off

Yes, you’ve heard this advice before and there are exceptions to every rule… I’m just sharing my personal experience.

Our team consisted of a designer, a biomedical engineer (who didn’t write a single line of code), a CS student (without a doubt the most “qualified” of all of us), and myself (a Political Science grad). I was the only non-engineering-educated person in the room. One essential lesson I have learned over and over in life is that it is futile to compete on a metric that you cannot possibly be the best at. Don’t compete with your second best arsenal. You need to find the edge that nobody else will think of, or where nobody else can be. If the competition can outspend you, outmanouever them. If the guy at the bar is better looking, be funnier. And if most of the guys in the room have PhDs in CS, go for hardware?

The night before the hackathon I picked up an arduino microcontroller, a few LEDs, some alligator clips, and a breadboard. I didn’t really know how things would come together, but I had spent some time hardware hacking and I was really interested in physical computing. I also figured that most of the guys in the room wouldn’t be thinking about hardware (this was a facebook hackathon, most people were looking up the Open Graph API). I hoped hardware would be our edge, and as it turns out, it was.

After a bit of brainstorming and chinese food we agreed to build Locksmasher – an arduino powered unlocking mechanism that would handle authentication through the Open Graph API. We wanted to create a way to grant one-time access to facebook friends that need to get into your house.

Half an hour into our brainstorming, one of my team members had to leave the hackathon to let a friend into his house. This event sparked the idea of locksmasher and outlines my second point – solve a real problem. A craft for a craft’s sake can often be futile. There are definitely exceptions to this, but most of the time, start with a defined problem and apply your craft, instead of the other way around. The judges loved that they could personally relate to the problem of needing to let someone into their house when they weren’t home.

Our hack was very simple – it was nothing more than a glorified switch that talked to facebook. Graeham (our biomedical engineer) hooked up an old door lock to the arduino for our demo. Yazad (the CS student) and I wrote a NodeJS server to talk to facebook. We spent most of our time dealing with authentication, a problem that could have been solved in a few hours by a better hacker who knows the facebook API well. In the meantime Vince (our designer) made everything look very beautiful. This brings me to my last point point, sometimes breadth is better than depth. I want to credit a tremendous amount of our success to Vince’s design work and Graeham’s hardware. By the end of the 36 hours, we had addressed a little bit of everything.

Most of the hackers in the room built some very elegant projects; machine learning algorithms, recommendation algorithms based on your friends likes, data parsing applications. However many of the projects were elegant for elegance sake and didn’t solve a pain point that the judges could relate to. Furthermore, they didn’t look at the whole package (arguably not necessary for a hackathon but I certainly think our sleek UI helped win over the crowd).

It easily highlights arduino’s adaptability to hooking with various technologies. It truly comes out as the bridge between hardware and software.

The project demo lies here.

Any hackathons worldwide in which our readers have used their Arduino? Please do link the demo or your blog :) We would love to read!

Via:[designcodelearn,HackerNews]

Social JukeBox: a physical connection to Spotify

Friday, May 25th, 2012

Social Jukebox is an Arduino-powered music player tailored to allow music sharing through tangible interaction. The device, based on  wooden tokens, has the aim of  bring back the physical aspect of music sharing and allow  multi-user listening in a social environment. The tokens have RFID chips embedded in them, so the music player can read the link to a Spotify song. The device randomly selects tokens and tracks as it goes, creating a real-life, listening experience.

For more information : http://interaction.dundee.ac.uk/~apairman/wordpress/

roBOt festival: 5° edizione

Thursday, May 17th, 2012

Il roBOt festival, giunto quest’anno alla sua quinta edizione, è un evento di carattere internazionale, promosso dall’Associazione Culturale Shape (e realizzato con il sostegno della Regione Emilia Romagna e del Comune di Bologna), il cui obiettivo è quello di mostrare “sul campo” lo stato dell’arte creativo, applicato ad ambiti quali l’arte, la sperimentazione e l’intrattenimento.

roBOt è terra d’elezione per chiunque metta in campo fortissimamente se stesso affrontando con spirito pioneristico ed innovatore le nuove arti contemporanee, quelle in grado di interagire con la tecnologia.

Il tema centrale di quest’anno riguarda “Il linguaggio del futuro”:

La moltitudine di sistemi non verbali e multimediali che rendono possibile lo scambio di informazioni, quindi la competenza comunicativa, di ogni singola entità all’interno della rete globale interconnessa.

Il roBOt festival è in cerca di nuove produzioni relative a installazioni, video, animazioni, performance, fotografia, design e autoproduzioni. Maggiori dettagli, così come il regolamento per la partecipazione alla selezione, possono essere trovati qui.

La deadline per la partecipazione è fissata per il 24 Giugno 2012.

[Via: roBOt festival]

How popular is the dress that you are purchasing?

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

A sparsely known fashion label C&A introduces a new initiative called ‘Fashion-like’ in it’s Brazillian store. A unique feature to import ‘likes’ on a particular clothing as compared to another may interest other labels too!

In an age when the ‘likes’ can be bought and influenced using facebook Ads, maybe if an unbiased way of finding that out is tailored, it may prove to be the next generation deciding feature in fashion and apparel design.

This is doable using an Arduino too! Probably with a lot more features!

Is there a maker in the house? ;)

Via:[TheVerge]

Feeding the dog over twitter

Thursday, March 8th, 2012

Many times you would have wished that you could take care of your dog remotely instead of letting a careless friend handle him. The answer to the problem is this ingenious twitter based feeding device by Nat Morris.

Theres a Nanode microcontroller (an Arduino clone with ENC28J60 ethernet), LCD screen from an old Dell laser printer, the stepper motor mechanism is out of a HP Deskjet 500 from the 90′s. The stepper is controlled via a ULN2003 and a 555 timer is used for the buzzer. Theres a pair of IP cameras (ones broke at the moment) and a server process which polls twitter and co-ordinates it all.

So how many more applications can you think of using the same concept? :)

[Via: webpronews]