Archive for the ‘Protocols’ Category

Enabling F-bus communications with Arduino

Saturday, January 19th, 2013

It’s always nice to see how creative makers approach communication issues in DIY projects, and today we would like to highlight the approach followed by Alex, from InsideGadgets.

On his website, he provides a detailed tutorial on how to use an old Nokia 6110 (or any derivatives) to send SMS messages by exploiting the Nokia’s F-bus, a simple bi-directional and full-duplex serial protocol.

After considerable reverse engineering work, made possible by useful online documentation, Alex finally managed to send a SMS from his Arduino board, connected to the phone, thanks to AVR libraries made available by AVRFreaks.

More information can be found on InsideGadget.

[Via: Inside Gadgets]

An Arduino-based ADB-to-USB adapter for NeXT keyboards

Thursday, January 10th, 2013

Have you ever wondered to use your old-fashioned NeXT keyboard with your current, non-ADB computer? The main issue that needs to be solved regards how to interface this ADB keyboard (standing for Apple Desktop Bus, an old protocol used in former NeXT and Apple computers) with a standard USB interface.

In this nice tutorial, Ladyada and Pt describe the approach they have used, based on an Arduino Micro board and… some luck in searching for the right information about the scancode table of the keyboard  ^^.

More information can be found here.

[Via: Adafruit Learning System]

 

MIDI with Arduino

Monday, September 10th, 2012

We have already mentioned the fantastic work of Amanda Ghassei for Instructables in this post.
I would like to report two other very useful documents.

The first is What is MIDI? and explain in detail how MIDI protocol works. The second, even more important is Send and Receive MIDI with Arduino. Please note, regarding the Midi input schematic, the use of  the 6N138 opto-isolator. Some MIDI interface schematics show the 4N25 opto-isolator which is a single transistor type, but the 6N138 shown there produces a much better output signal.

Via:[Instructables]

 

Arduino, GPS and Display i2C…

Friday, May 25th, 2012

 

En este nuevo tutorial Arduino by ARDUTEKA, estudiamos a fondo los módulos GPS, en concreto los módulos diseñados por LIBELIUM, para aprender a extraer y comprender todas las tramadas de datos que recibimos de los GPS y posteriormente, tratar esa información para mostrar en un display con bus i2C datos como la latitud, longitud, altura y hora UTC…

 

 

[Via: Arduteka]

 

 

Portable and cloud-based heart rate tracker

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

In his blog, Charalampos describes his experience with SeeedStudio’s Grove Ear-clip Heart Rate sensor and Cosm (former Pachube) cloud service. The employed sensor is quite cheap and can detect heart pulses from the ear lobe, by measuring the infra-red light reflected by the tissue and by checking for intensity variations.

By connecting this sensor with an ADK board and, in turn, with an Android smartphone, Charalampos implemented a portable heart-rate tracker, which is used to send the recorded data to Cosm cloud service.

For more information and sample code, see here.

[Via: Building Internet of Things]

 

 

Arduino-based theremin

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Theremin is one of the most exiting musical instruments ever made, mainly because of its “quite odd” playing method. Infact, its working principle is based on near-filed coupling between the hands of the theremin player and two metal antennas, used to determine the pitch of a variable-frequency oscillator and to adjust the volume of the output signal, respectively.
Several theremin implementation are possible, such as the “original” analog one (based on the mixing of two sine waves originated by a fixed-frequency oscillator and a variable-frequency one) and those based on digital techniques.
LabIII guys implemented a nice and simple Arduino theremin module, based on a TTL LC-type oscillator, usable not only to play electronic music, but also as a generic sensing-device, for example to control motors and/or to work with Processing, Max etc.
The detailed description of the project, together with schematics and source code, can be found here.

 

[Via: elektor.it]

TicTocTrac: track your perception of time

Monday, May 14th, 2012

TicTocTrac Wristwatch

Brian Schiffer and Sima Mitra, from Cornell University, propose a very nice wristwatch that allows you to keep track of your time perception, using a method known as duration production: TicTocTrac.

Human perception of time is typically distorted, due to the different amount of information and experiences acquired everyday. TicTocTrac lets you to estimate your own perception, first by signaling the perceived duration of a given event and, then, by comparing it with the actual event duration. Finally, all the information can easily be saved to a micro SD card.

The hardware is based on a Atmega32u4, a DS3234S real-time clock and several leds to display time, while the software part is mostly based on Arduino’s DS3234S RTC library.

More information can be found here.

[Via: TicTocTrac]

Control An LCD with a 595 Shift Register

Monday, January 16th, 2012

[Carlo Denaro] is sharing a smart solution to save digital pins while controlling an LCD, using Shift Register 74HC595. A simple yet useful project with skecth&libraries, datasheets and Fritzing schematics.

via [grayhats.org]

Portable, DIY Disco Dance Floor

Friday, December 9th, 2011

[Rave Rover's Chris Williamson] made a portable DIY dancefloor, sharing instructions and schematics.

Like with many projects similar to this, an Arduino board controls pretty much everything. The floor is dominated by powerful LED lights, which respond to a Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI). A small computer is also inside (complete with Wi-fi), along with a car radio hooked up to speakers. Oh, and thanks to additional wheelchair motors, the floor can be wheeled away to wherever it’s needed.

Chris managed to build the dance floor in just one month, and documented how to do it on Instructables for anyone who wants to make their own. And now you’ve seen this, would you really want to throw a party without one?

via [PCworld] source [Instructables]

Connecting your Arduino to AIR using an AIR Native Extension

Monday, December 5th, 2011

[quetwo] aka Nicholas Kwiatkowski developed a native interface to receive serial data in Flash.

[...]  The AIR Native Extension (ANE) is a C based .DLL / .framework for the Windows/Mac platforms that allows AIR to essentially open a COM port.  I wrote it in a way that is supposed to emulate the functions of the flash.net.Socket library that is included in the AIR runtime.  I’ve posted the entire project, including the source code and final binaries on Google Code at http://code.google.com/p/as3-arduino-connector/

via [quetwo], [GoogleCode]