Archive for the ‘Printers’ Category

An IBM Selectric II wishes to be a teletype

Friday, June 15th, 2012

In his blog, Marc from Robot Dialogs presents a very nice hack involving a IBM Selectric II typewriter: by means of an Arduino board and several solenoids, the typewriter can be successfully connected to a computer to emulate a vintage teletype.

The complete story can be found here, together with several videos about its development.

[Via: Hack A Day]

Print broadway discount stickers using Arduino

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

A weekend project by Adafruit to print announcements and discount coupons from the internet.

This project uses an Arduino Uno, an ethernet shield, a thermal printer (aka receipt printer) and a Staples easy button to print out the current discount percentages available at the tkts times square booth for Broadway shows.

A beautiful tutorial accompanies the project.

Via:[Adafruit]

Old style tweet printing machine

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

The Twittertape Machine prototype from Adam Vaughan connects to his Twitter account via Ethernet, checks for updates twice every minute, and prints out a hard copy of any new Tweets without the need for printer ink.

Vaughan told us that the idea for the Twittertape Machine was born of a desire to have the kind of old stock ticker seen in movies sitting on his desk. After a lukewarm reception to his pitch from friends, he decided to make his dream a reality. Rather than sacrifice a rare original (like the Edison Universal Stock Ticker used for Ames Bielenberg’s Spring Break project), he opted to build his own replica version from some old brass clock movements, a wooden plinth and a glass dome found online.

It is powered by two AC adapters and is controlled by a network-enabled Arduino-style microcontroller running custom code in the base. The board checks Vaughan’s Twitter account every 30 seconds for new Tweets.

The little thermal printer hidden at the base prints the tweets on a cut-down thermal paper. An awesome product in an awesome demand!

[Via: Twittertape and Gizmag]

Displaying on Paper – Thermal Printer + Arduino

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

Guys at [bildr] wrote a nice tutorial on how to control & use a thermal printer with Arduino.

Outputting data can be extremely useful, and typically when we look at doing this, it is either to the Arduino’s serial terminal, or to some sort of display. But what about making physical copies of the data? (…) If you dont know about thermal printers, they are most often the printers your store’s receipts are printed on. The reason for this is that they dont use ink, or use a cartridge of any sort. The paper it prints on turns black when heated. So this printer simply applies heat where another printer would apply ink.

via [bildr]

Arduino-Controlled Robot Brings Pointillism Back!

Friday, August 12th, 2011

[Paul Ferragout] realized a strange printer, with an incorporated program to print any image using a time-based algorithm. According to the grey value of a pixel on an image, the felt pen remains in contact with the blotting paper for relative periods of time.

The Arduino-controlled Time Print Machine uses an algorithm to “paint” images — portraits, still lives, you name it — out of nothing but splotches of ink. Equipped with a felt pen and blotting paper, it works like a CNC-milling machine. Program the machine to render a digital image, and the pen starts stabbing at the paper, varying the amount of time it spends on each dot according to the gray value of the respective pixel; the more time allotted, the more the ink bleeds, and the thicker the dot.

The resulting images can take up to 34 hours to print and look like bad photocopies, each totally unique. We’re not sure whether to think of the Time Print Machine as the world’s least-efficient printer or the world’s most-efficient Pointillist painter. The one thing we know is this: The machine is weirdly hypnotic. We could watch that thing drop ink all afternoon

via [FastCoDesign] source [Paul Ferrabout]

NYC Resistor’s Twitter Teletype

Friday, April 9th, 2010

not the first, but the oldest teletype hack ever (up to now). Check out the video from NYC Resistor.

NYC Resistor was invited to exhibit our old Teletype Model 15 at Eyebeam’s MIXER event last March.  To make life interesting, we used a small Python program to grab tweets from Twitter matching the “eyebeam” keyword.  Watching a 50+ year old device once used to bang out the news of the day turn to printing the trivialities of the moment seems to echo the fate of professional journalists as the world’s attention span dwindles. To make things more interesting, we used a sentiment analysis algorithm to parse incoming tweets for positive or negative sentiment. The results were reflected on an old chart plotter. Positive sentiments moved the mark left. The middle of the paper represented neutral sentiment. Click the image for more photos and a video awaits after the break.

(more…)

DIY Toner Transfer Circuit Etching *UV* Developing [from Beloved MAKEzine]

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

Today is the “circuit etching” day. I wanted to enlarge the disussion of this previous post, by embedding this nice tutorial on Circuit Etching from Colin Cunningam of Make.

via [MAKE]

DIY Toner Transfer Circuit Etching

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

Well. As most of you I begin my day hanging around in different forums. One of them (one of the firsts) is the Arduino Forum, with his new layout.

In these day a thread took my attention: P18F4550 made his first Arduino Shield. When questioned to make a step by step guide of the all process he posted wonderful pics of the all thing.

[from P18F4550 on the Arduino Forum]

Design the circuit, i use PCB Wizard
(more…)

TwypeWriter (Twitter Monitoring Typewriter)

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

Nice Oomlout wat to have a twitter-related typewriter. Arduino (+ethernet shield) searches for a keyword and then physically prints the results for everyone in the office.
Code ready.

Good work!

via [Oomlout]
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