Sharp Rangefinder DemystifiedSharp Rangefinder DemystifiedSharp Rangefinder Demystified

Davide GombaNovember 17th, 2010

 

Some days ago a on the Arduino Forum [jezuz] shared a link that I found really exhaustive in choosing among the different flavours of Sharp Rangefinders.

Over the years, Sharp has introduced a family of infra-red detectors.  These detectors boast a small package, very little current consumption, and a variety of output options.  This article offers an overview of the various types, information on interfacing them, and hints and tips.

I’ve always found this sensor very useful and suitable for a lot of projects. One of his cons is a less sensibility towards black objects. [cr0sh] explains it:

That’s because black absorbs IR (and a whole host of other frequencies in the visible range – hence, black); a ping-style ultrasonic sensor likewise has issues with non-uniform surfaces, and more seriously with soft objects like pillows (or other sound-absorbing material).

There is no one “do it all” sensor for ranging, unfortunately (with the exception of possibly LIDAR coupled with extensive mapping and processing – not something that is cheap or even doable with only an Arduino). So you need to combine sensors and then integrate the data that they produce so your system can gain a better idea of what is “out there”.

read-on the conversation to the [Arduino Forum] source [Acroname]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some days ago a on the Arduino Forum [jezuz] shared a link that I found really exhaustive in choosing among the different flavours of Sharp Rangefinders.

Over the years, Sharp has introduced a family of infra-red detectors. These detectors boast a small package, very little current consumption, and a variety of output options. This article offers an overview of the various types, information on interfacing them, and hints and tips.

I’ve always found this sensor very useful and suitable for a lot of projects. One of his cons is a less sensibility towards black objects. [cr0sh] explains it:

That’s because black absorbs IR (and a whole host of other frequencies in the visible range – hence, black); a ping-style ultrasonic sensor likewise has issues with non-uniform surfaces, and more seriously with soft objects like pillows (or other sound-absorbing material).

There is no one “do it all” sensor for ranging, unfortunately (with the exception of possibly LIDAR coupled with extensive mapping and processing – not something that is cheap or even doable with only an Arduino). So you need to combine sensors and then integrate the data that they produce so your system can gain a better idea of what is “out there”.

read-on the conversation to the [Arduino Forum] source [Acroname]

 

Some days ago a on the Arduino Forum [jezuz] shared a link that I found really exhaustive in choosing among the different flavours of Sharp Rangefinders.

Over the years, Sharp has introduced a family of infra-red detectors. These detectors boast a small package, very little current consumption, and a variety of output options. This article offers an overview of the various types, information on interfacing them, and hints and tips.

I’ve always found this sensor very useful and suitable for a lot of projects. One of his cons is a less sensibility towards black objects. [cr0sh] explains it:

That’s because black absorbs IR (and a whole host of other frequencies in the visible range – hence, black); a ping-style ultrasonic sensor likewise has issues with non-uniform surfaces, and more seriously with soft objects like pillows (or other sound-absorbing material).

There is no one “do it all” sensor for ranging, unfortunately (with the exception of possibly LIDAR coupled with extensive mapping and processing – not something that is cheap or even doable with only an Arduino). So you need to combine sensors and then integrate the data that they produce so your system can gain a better idea of what is “out there”.

read-on the conversation to the [Arduino Forum] source [Acroname]

 

 

 

 

One Response to “Sharp Rangefinder DemystifiedSharp Rangefinder DemystifiedSharp Rangefinder Demystified

  1. Solarbotics Says:

    It’s a pity that Sharp killed their *entire* opto-sensor line, including this series. Well, the PCB on the GP2D12 is dated ’95, so they are 15-year old technology, but still, they work so well!

    Been searching for a suitable replacement. Anybody else have any luck finding something besides ultrasonics?

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