Archive for the ‘Tutorial’ Category

Manipulate your voice with Mimic Monster and Intel Edison

Monday, May 18th, 2015


It’s time to introduce you to another great tutorial made for  Intel Edison.  Mimic Monster is a project allowing you to record soundbites and playing them back manipulated.
In this step-by-step project, everyone who is interested in audio features and mods , can find useful information on how to manipulate audio files and create amazing effects from your voice. (more…)

Knock knock! Who’s near your door? Learn how to sense it

Monday, May 4th, 2015


Smart Doorbell is the name of the project for a new tutorial created for Intel Edison. It’s a motion detecting doorbell, that senses when someone is near the door(bell) and via a webcam sends a picture of the person approaching the door to a web address while playing a sound.



Create the DIY version of Egg-bot running on Arduino

Monday, April 27th, 2015


We featured Nikodem’s bike tachometer last September on this blog. He’s now sharing with us another DIY project called DIY Arduino controlled Egg-Bot. It’s a DIY version of the original Egg-bot created by Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories.

You can follow the step-by-step tutorial on Instructables and here’s a preview of the bill of materials you’ll need to make the project at home: (more…)

Getting Started with Intel Edison Mini Breakout Board

Monday, March 16th, 2015


Let’s start exploring a bit more about Intel Edison. As you may already know, Intel provides 2 different hardware platforms to work with Edison development board: the core module is called Intel Edison Compute Module, while the 2 extension boards are called Intel Edison Arduino Board and Intel Edison Breakout Board respectively. We refer to them as the Arduino module and mini-breakout board, respectively. The tutorial of this week is called Getting Started with Intel Edison Mini Breakout Board: (more…)

Making a lasercut Movie Recommender with Intel Edison

Monday, March 2nd, 2015


Some days ago we posted on Intel Makers Community an educational tutorial focused on Intel Edison. Our team explored Internet Queries to build a lasercut Movie Recommender and help you find a good movie title  extracted from The Open Movie Database starting from the 50s to the 10s and according to your favourite genre: (more…)

What time is it? Explore Galileo board’s real time clock tutorial

Friday, February 20th, 2015


In the past weeks we explored how to make a gsm-controlled star light, a touch-screen controlled marionette, and how to learn more about Linux on Intel Galileo Gen 2.

In today’s tutorial  you’ll learn how to create a “Wake up clock” which will turn on and illuminate the room slowly, simulating a morning sunrise. And hopefully, it will make waking up on Mondays a bit easier! (more…)

Build a Touchscreen Controlled Marionette with Intel Galileo

Saturday, February 14th, 2015


Making gets really interesting and fun especially when mixing laser cut shapes, servo motor, tft screen, MDF, plexiglass and Intel Galileo Gen 2. After you assemble the parts and follow the steps of this tutorial, you’ll be able to control the puppet through an interface on the screen. Enjoy the tutorial!

We are going to have a little fun with the Intel® Galileo development board. This time around, we’ll make a simple puppet control system. We’ve put together a “running robot” marionette with a simple mechanism that uses a continuous servo. We’ll be use a touchscreen interface to control various outputs using sliders and switches.

As always, you can modify the designs to suit your needs. We will teach you how to incorporate touchscreens, and make the interface necessary for controlling the Intel® Galileo Gen 2 board.

Just so you know, the instructions this time around are quite long. That’s due to the assembly of the marionette. I would review the assembly instructions fully before attempting to put it together. While it looks long and complicated, if you group the parts, it much simpler.

So, let’s start the puppet show!

Follow the link and start making!


A tutorial about avoiding warping with Arduino Materia 101

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015


Some of you may have experienced that when you start to print a cube or box-shaped objects they can easily warp on the corners. The reason for this is the change of volume that plastic goes through when cooling down: it shrinks when becoming cooler. Even if PLA, the corn-based plastic we use on the Arduino Materia 101, shrinks much less than ABS, it can become a problem when printing things that require a high level of precision. (more…)

Design a LEGO- compatible servo holder and print it with Materia 101

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015


This week we are presenting you a new tutorial on 3d printing of Lego-compatible pieces with Materia 101. Kristoffer designed a brick with the parametric 3d modeler FreeCAD that can hold a small servo. Following the 10-step instructions  you can easily add wheels to robots built in LEGO and  use specific servos with different sizes. (more…)

How to print a Pirate Hook with your Materia 101

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014


Using a 3d printer means playing with some hardware but especially some softwares. In the tutorial of this week, the fourth tutorial of our series , Kris is going to introduce you how to work with Slic3r, a G-Code generator for 3d printers and basically a tool you need to convert a digital 3D model into printing instructions for your 3D printer. Slic3r is an open source software able to cut the model into horizontal slices (layers), generates toolpaths to fill them and calculates the amount of material to be extruded so that you can reach good results. (more…)