The world knows what you did last summer

Zoe Romano July 8, 2014

i know what you did last summer
Jaap de Maat shared with us his final year project called I know what you did last summer, the finale to a two-year-long MA in Information Experience Design of the Royal College of Art. The ingredients are  simple (an old electric wheel chair, an Arduino Mega, 12v motor board, Bluetooth slave, wires, blood sweat and tears) and the concept is very actual:

It is physically impossible for the human brain to remember every event from our past in full detail. The default setting is to forget and our memories are constructed based on our current values. In the digital age it has become easier to look back with great accuracy. But this development contains hidden dangers, as those stored recollections can easily be misinterpreted and manipulated. That sobering thought should rule our online behaviour, because the traces we leave behind now will follow us around for ever.

inside of the installation

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Node.js on the Arduino Yún via the Bridge library

Zoe Romano July 7, 2014

ArduinoYun

Tom Igoe some days ago wrote an interesting post about Arduino Yún on his blog.  We post it here as it could be useful to the Arduino Community.

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Recently, Federico Fissore added node.js to the package repository for the Arduino Yún. Here’s how you get node to communicate with the Arduino processor on the Yún via the Bridge library.

To do this, you’ll need an Arduino Yún, a microSD card, a microUSB cable and a wifi connection. You should be familiar with the basics of the Arduino Yún and node.js in order to get the most out of this post.

All of the code for this post can be found on my GitHub repository. Read the rest of this entry »

The Funky Chicken

Zoe Romano July 3, 2014

Funky Chicken
The Funky Chicken was created during a series of workshops that were given as part of the larger project “Interactive Sensory Objects Designed for and by People with Learning Disabilities”:

It was designed by Rumena, a student from the Reading College LLD/D course (people with learning disabilities) who attended the workshops on a regular basis. She made the papier mache chicken, painted it and added the frills and ornaments, and wanted it to sit inside a basket but flap it’s wings and cluck. We helped her to complete this artwork by adding the necessary electronics including an Arduino Uno, Adafruit Waveshield, speaker and a servo to make the wings flap.

The whole flapping/clucking of the chicken is triggered using a sonar attached to Arduino Uno. Moving within 1m of the chicken will trigger it:

 In the image below the sonar is hooked up to the Arduino Uno, and the Arduino is connected to the servo controller (not shown). The sonar is a very inexpensive off-the-shelf HC-SR04, which has a range of about 3m.

Funky Chicken

Here’s the video with the chicken at work:

 

Freefall camera: an autonomous skydiving robot

Zoe Romano July 2, 2014

freefallcamera1

A group of skydivers and engineers, combined their passions to create the world’s first autonomous skydiving robot, equipped by a camera and controlled by Arduino Mega.

ArduinoMega Freefallcamera

The Freefall Camera is a student project at the University of Nottingham, its team is composed by David Alatorre, Tom Dryden, Tom Shorten and Peter Storey who received the third prize at the Student Venture Challenge from the Haydn Green Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Read the rest of this entry »

See you at Fab10! 2-8 July in Barcelona – #fab10

Zoe Romano July 1, 2014

fab10

This year the  international event for digital manufacturing comes to Barcelona to celebrate 10 years of sharing experiences and the evolution of the project. Ever since the first meeting of digital manufacturing experts was held in 2004, in Boston, until FAB10 today, these meetings have been travelling around the world spreading ideas and receiving support.

FAB10 is organised by the Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IaaC). Hábitat Urbano from Barcelona City Council, the Center for Bits and Atoms, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Fab Foundation, both in Boston, have worked in close collaboration.

Fab 10 is divided in 3 main areas and Arduino will participate to the event with different talks and workshops: Read the rest of this entry »

Two new little tools for your tinkering time with Arduino

Zoe Romano June 30, 2014

Two new Arduino products are available starting today from the Arduino Store. Read below for details!

Arduino USB Host Shield

ArduinoHostShield

This shield allows you to connect devices to your Arduino using a USB port, for example game controllers, digital cameras, phones, keyboards, etc:

- it is based on the MAX3421E, which is a USB peripheral/host controller containing the digital logic and analog circuitry necessary to implement a full-speed USB peripheral or a full-/low-speed host compliant to USB specification rev 2.0.

- it can be used with the “USB Host Library for Arduino” hosted by Oleg Mazurov and Alexei Glushchenko from circuits@home, Kristian Lauszus and Andrew Kroll on GitHub (click to download zip).

If you want to see how to use it, take a look at this tutorial from Officine Arduino which used it to add wireless to an RC Car.

Buy USB Host Shield now

 

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ArduinoISP

ArduinoISP

It’s a tiny AVR-ISP (in-system programmer) based on David Mellis’ project FabISP and useful to anyone needing more space on the Arduino board. Uploading a sketch with an external programmer can be used for three main reasons:

- remove the bootloader and use the extra space for your sketch

- burn the bootloader on your Arduino, so you can recover it if you accidentally corrupt the bootloader.

- when you use a new ATmega microcontroller in your Arduino, and you need the bootloader in order to upload a sketch in the usual way.

For more details about using the Arduino ISP please visit the Getting Started page

Learn how to program an ATtiny and to read your Arduino built-in EEPROM using ArduinoISP in the tutorials on Scuola.

Buy Arduino ISP now

 

Internet of things with Arduino Yún and Yaler

Zoe Romano June 28, 2014

ArduinoYun and Yaler

Explore this tutorial  demonstrating how the Arduino Yún can be controlled from anywhere with any internet connected web browser. The solution is provided by Bo Peterson using the Yaler service which means that the Yún can be reached from any network without knowing the IP-address, and without any port forwarding on the router where the Yún is connected.

A common problem in home automation and internet of things applications is that it is difficult to reach devices connected behind wifi routers from the outside. There are different approaches to overcome this problem:

  • Port forwarding and static ip addresses. This solution requires the user of the connected device to know how to configure a router and have access to router administration which is not always possible. A Yun tutorial with port forwarding is found here.
  • Polling is a technique where the connected device at regular intervals checks with an external server if the device should take action. This solution requires no configuration of the router but it creates extra network traffic and response delays.
  • A third way is to use WebSockets which is a way of providing real time full-duplex communication over TCP. Spacebrew is a good open source toolkit for connected devices using WebSockets. Autobahn is another infrastructure that can be used.
  • Reverse HTTP is the solution that will be used in this tutorial. We will use Yaler which is an open source relay infrastructure that gives access to connected devices with very little configuration.

Follow the tutorial and get the code at this link.

Soccer Penalty Kicks game with Wiring and Arduino

Zoe Romano June 26, 2014

penales

It’s FIFA World Cup time and we have a project for makers who prefer to be active instead of only watching the others play. The exciting penalty shoot-out we’ve always enjoyed in video games was implemented by  as an electro-mechanical game where you save goals using a control device and kick the ball with your fingers:

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An interactive coin jar saving for a good cause

Zoe Romano June 25, 2014

lightup

At the end of May, Massimo Banzi and Giorgio Olivero (Todo) spent some days at the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design to teach a class called Connected Objects. The class goal was to envision, design and implement interactive objects that are open and connected, whose design and behaviour can be used to sense, read and affect the domestic landscape or other shared environments.

One of the team of students (Arun Mota, Hsiang-Lin Yang, Yashodeep Gholap) worked on Arduino Yún to create an energy redistribution service that allows people to save money and in parallel donate towards energy distribution projects in deprived areas of the world:

LightUp is an interactive fundraising coin jar that firstly encourages personal savings and then also allows people to contribute a part of their savings towards the cause. The system allows them to track in real-time exactly how many units of electricity they helped generate. Another visible reward is the jar lights up for 10 minutes each time they drop a coin.

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Wireless Controlled Robotic Hand made with Arduino Lilypad

Zoe Romano June 24, 2014

wireless robotic hand

Gabri295 published on Instructable a tutorial for a project created during his last year of high school.  It’s  an artificial hand controlled by a glove with 5 flex sensors and Arduino Lilypad . The artificial hand reproduces the movements of the hand wearing the glove.

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