Archive for the ‘Xbee’ Category

A DIY magnetic levitation vehicle to inspire future engineers

Saturday, June 8th, 2013

DIY maglev

Next to our Arduino booth at Makerfaire Bay Area we had a cool project created by Antipodes, a girls robotics team headquartered in Pacifica, California, USA. It’s a Do It Yourself (DIY) remote controlled (RC) model maglev with electromagnetic propulsion, or shortly called maglev.

A maglev is just like a conventional train but instead of wheels it has magnets and it levitates!

The team did a great job not only for the results achieved but especially in sharing the project’s documentation, detailed with all the steps for the construction through videos and pictures so that others can more easily follow in their footsteps.

DIY maglev

 

(more…)

XBee-controlled 4WD wireless robot

Sunday, December 23rd, 2012

In his blog, Michael describes a nice 4WD robot he realized by means of an arduino-compatible board, a motor shield and a couple of XBee radios, which have been used to implement a simple and effective remote control.

Actually, the remote is made up of a standard breadboard equipped with a joystick, a couple of buttons (that can turn the robot in a Kitt-like vehicle!) and the XBee radio. One interesting feature of this project is that the remote controller is fairly simple and has been designed to work with just the XBee radio board, instead of requiring an additional MCU.

More details can be found here.

[Via: Project Lab - Nootropic design]

Arduino based Quadrotor on a PCB

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

There are many Quadrotor Projects out there. But, they require a hobbyist to deal with the Frame Designing (Mechanical), a bit of Microcontroller knowledge as well as dealing with the Motor Control (Power Electronics). You may purchase a commercial Radio and a readymade Kit for flying. But, to Do-It-Yourself, is an achievement in itself.

4pcb Quad

Here is a picture of a Quadrotor designed by Shane Colton using Arduino Pro mini as its flying brain. Shane is a Ph.D Student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. On being asked about the Project, he replied:

I heard about Arduino some time in 2007/2008 and have used it for a few projects since then. I built the quadrotor for fun / hobby (not related to research). I wanted to build my own (quadrotor) from scratch because I could integrate all the parts onto a single circuit board, and because I like designing the control system myself.

(more…)

Arduino gets 3G connectivity

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Libelium, with its open source hardware division of Cooking Hacks has come out with a new 3G module for arduino.

The new 3G shield for Arduino enables connectivity to high speed WCDMA and HSPA cellular networks allowing transfers up to 7.2Mbps (20 times faster than with GPRS technology). The module also counts with an internal GPS that enables the location of any Arduino both outdoors and indoors, combining standard positioning data from satellites with mobile cell triangulation in the assisted mobile mode (A-GPS).

The new Arduino 3G module also includes a small camera for video recording in high resolution and a complete audio interface that enables Arduino to run with all the functionalities of a smartphone device.

And just to remind our readers about cooking hacks? They were the people who created the XBee shield for arduino.

Further information regarding this new 3G/GPRS module can be found here.

Via:[EMSnow, cooking-hacks, memristor]

DIY Radio Control

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Going to buy a new Wireless Controller for your next Robotics project. Why buy a new one when you can Do-It-Yourself? All you need is an Arduino, an old Joystick with a Gameport (15-pin connector) and a pair of Series 1 xBee Modules.

The explanation of the xBee Configuration and the xBee Packet Description is very well done at the blog.

Block Diagram

Transmitter: Joystick + xBee [No additional hardware needed]
Receiver: xBee + Arduino + [your amazing Robot, Car or a Plane!]

Schematic

 

Easy cross platform configurator for XBee modules

Thursday, March 8th, 2012

Italian company “moltosenso” has released a free, cross-platform software that allows you to configure all the parameters of your XBee modules. (more…)

Ball of Dub Keeps Audio in Your Hands

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Ball of Dub from LUSTlab on Vimeo.

Accelerometer to Renoise via OSC  to control trippy and dubby sounds.

[Lizzie] from LustLab sent in her Ball of Dub that turns a few accelerometer and a digital audio workstation and turns everything into an aural experience of wubs and dubs. The Ball of Dub can turn just about anything into dubstep, and does so with a fairly interesting user interface.

There isn’t a build log for the Ball of Dub, but  the folks at LustLab did send in a basic overview of her project. Inside the ball, there’s a Razor IMU from Sparkfun that is attached to the ever-popular XBee wireless transceiver. A tiny program on an Arduino calibrates the gyroscope and accelerometer and sends that data to the DAW at 50Hz.

The host computer is running Renoise, a very popular tracker that can accept MIDI and OSC input. A Processing app parses the ball spin, free fall and impact, averages them over a period of time, and pipes that into the OSC input of Renoise. In [Lizzie]‘s video, the ball spin is sent to a low-pass filter on the baseline track, and the average impact is applied to the vocal track.

via [HackADay] source [LustLab Tumblr] special demo video for the few skeptical comments on HackADay

“Light Scythe” Lets You Do Huge Light Paintings

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011

Some of you may know “light painting”  it’s a photographic technique which uses long exposures and a light source, to “paint” the photo with light. The project was inspired by the Wifi Netword Visualization, The Mechatronics Guy later brought in the concept of writing and painting pictures with the beams of light with a pc (wirelessly via Xbee).

The hardware is pretty simple. There’s a 2m programmable LED strip inside an acrylic tube, which is controlled from a small receiver and battery pack. A laptop PC with a wireless Xbee link sends the image data to the scythe at a specified time.

via [UberGizmo] source [mechatronicsGuy]

Arduino, Php, Lcds, Xbees: Tactical Texting In Public Spaces

Friday, September 17th, 2010

It’s been quite a long time since I’m following this project. Now [Michael] came to a certain level of stability and shared his thoughts (and codes) for our personal benefit:

While the adventure in working on this project began months ago, I’ve finally sorted through the mess of files I made and put it all together in a nice handy zip folder. Using Arduinos, XBees, LCDs, and PHP, this project was challenging from a technical stand-point, but I think the project is now at a place where it can act as a foundation for a number of other projects I’m hoping to take on.

While the most-recent installation of this project was on view as part of SRSI, I’m already looking at the Arduino-TVOut library dreaming of what to do next.

I have to find some time to read back again all the project.

via [BrockenCityLabs]

 

 

Arduino, Php, Lcds, Xbees: Tactical Texting In Public Spaces

Friday, September 17th, 2010

It’s been quite a long time since I’m following this project. Now [Michael] came to a certain level of stability and shared his thoughts (and codes) for our personal benefit:

While the adventure in working on this project began months ago, I’ve finally sorted through the mess of files I made and put it all together in a nice handy zip folder. Using Arduinos, XBees, LCDs, and PHP, this project was challenging from a technical stand-point, but I think the project is now at a place where it can act as a foundation for a number of other projects I’m hoping to take on.

While the most-recent installation of this project was on view as part of SRSI, I’m already looking at the Arduino-TVOut library dreaming of what to do next.

I have to find some time to read back again all the project.

via [BrockenCityLabs]

 

 

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