Archive for the ‘Wifi’ Category

Welcome Arduino Yún – the first board combining Arduino with Linux

Saturday, May 18th, 2013

Arduino Yun - iso

 

Massimo Banzi announced it some minutes ago during his annual “The state of Arduino” presentation at Maker Faire Bay Area:  Arduino Yún  is the first of a revolutionary family of wifi products combining Arduino with Linux.

Yún means “cloud” in chinese language,  as the purpose of this board to make it simple to connect to complex web services directly from Arduino.

ArduinoYun - scheme

Designed in collaboration with Dog Hunter, a company with extensive experience with Linux, the board adopts the Linino distribution which provides signed packages to ensure the authenticity of the software installed on the device.

Historically, interfacing Arduino with complex web services has been quite a challenge due to the limited memory available and they tend to use verbose text based formats like XML that require quite a lot or ram to parse. On the Arduino Yún we have created the Bridge library which delegates all network connections and processing of HTTP transactions to the Linux machine.

Arduino Yún is the combination of a classic Arduino Leonardo (based on the Atmega32U4 processor) with a Wifi system-on-a-chip running Linino (a MIPS GNU/Linux based on OpenWRT). It’s based on the ATMega32u4 microcontroller and on the Atheros AR9331, a system on a chip running Linino, a customized version of OpenWRT, the most used Linux distribution for embedded devices.

Like a Leonardo, it has 14 digital input/output pins (of which 7 can be used as PWM outputs and 12 as analog inputs), a 16 MHz crystal oscillator and a micro USB connector.

Arduino_Yun
Like any modern computer, it’s Wi-Fi enabled, it has a Standard-A type USB connector to which you can connect your USB devices and it has a micro-SD card plug, for additional storage.

The Yún ATMega32u4 can be programmed as a standard Arduino board by plugging it to your computer with the micro USB connector. And you can also program it via Wi-Fi.

When the Yún is turned on for the first time, it becomes an Access Point, creating a Wi-Fi network named “Arduino”. Open your browser and go to the webpanel: configure the board by entering your Wi-Fi network name, type and password. Click the “Configure” button to restart the board and have it join your home network. Opening the IDE, you’ll see it listed in the “Port” sub menu with its IP address instead of the serial port name.

Using the Bridge library in your sketches, you can link the 32u4 to Linux, launching programs and scripts, passing them parameters (sensor readings for example) and reading their output, thus creating a strong integration between the creativity of your sketch and the power of Linux. The Yún supports Shell and Python scripts out-of-the-box but you can install a wide range of open source software and tools.

For the Linux geek in you, Yún can be reached with SSH:  that means you’ll be able to customize it in whatever way. And you’ll always be able to reset it to its factory settings.

On top of that to make it even simpler to create complex applications we’ve partnered with the innovative startup Temboo which provides normalized access to 100+ APIs from a single point of contact allowing developers to mix and match data coming from multiple platforms (for example Twitter, Facebook, Foursquare but even FedEx or PayPal).

Arduino Yún will be available at the end of June at the price of 69$ + taxes.

 

Arduino Wifi Shield is back on the store!

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

We’re happy to announce the Arduino Wifi Shield being back on the Arduino Store. Since we launched it back in August we had an overwhelming request for the product that ended up in solding it out.

Welcome back, bro.

Arduino Powered 2.4 GHz Spectrum Analyzer Lets You

Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

Arduino forum user [Blibo] shares its 2.4 Ghz spectrum analyzer project on the forum. The project is based on the CYWM6935 board (wireless), an Atmega 328 and a Nokia 5110 LCD-

I finished the (mostly) permanent version of my 2.4ghz spectrum analyzer, and soldered it up. I included 3 modes for scanning (fast, slow, and ghost – like the long exposure on a camera), plus a function to display the voltage on an analog pin, and graph it (for when the oscilloscope’s not cooperating). These modes are toggled through by hitting the big push button [...] I have already used it to help setup my wireless network, (channel, location, things that cause interference), and it is always interesting to see what uses the 2.4ghz spectrum. So far, the things that I’ve noticed on the spectrum while walking around with the analyzer are: 
-microwave ovens (huge disturbance in the middle of the spectrum)
-Wifi 
-Cordless phones
-Bluetooth
-Wireless keyboard
-Wireless speakers
The fast mode is ok for seeing EMI, but for digital signals, the slow mode is best. The ghost mode also gives a general idea of spectrum use over a period of time.

via [HackADay] source(code) on [Arduino Forum]

Wifi Network Visualization

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

Immaterials: Light painting WiFi from Timo on Vimeo.

Very interesting visualization of the wi-fi network using Arduino and a wi-fi antenna. It’s the same concept of the other “Immaterial” movie: the  visualisation of an RFID antenna range.

This film is about investigating and contextualising WiFi networks through visualisation. It is made by Timo Arnall, Jørn Knutsen, Einar Sneve Martinussen. The film is a continuation of our explorations of intangible phenomena that have implications for design and effect how both products and cities are experienced. Matt Jones of BERG has summarised these phenomena as ‘Immaterials’, and uses sociality, data, time and radio as examples. Radio and wireless communication are a fundamental part of the construction of networked cities. This generates what William Mitchell called an ‘electromagnetic terrain’ that is both intricate and invisible, and only hinted at by the presence of antennas (2004, p.55).

via [YOurban] and [Touch]

WiFi Enabled Whole House Power Meter

Monday, January 10th, 2011

The Open Hardware web community has made plenty of examples about power monitoring and consumption knowledge: from ladyada’s tweet-a-watt to Jarv’s Home power Monitoring. [Greg] shares code & circuits on his own power monitoring system based on Wifi Communication.

First things first – this project is a blatant and obvious rip-off of John Jarvis’ power monitoring project! A few minor details have changed but I have to give him credit for a great project idea. I was intrigued by John’s power meter and it gave me an excuse to buy and try an Arduino – a handy and fun little embedded project platform! John’s power meter uses the ethernet shield and some CGI scripts, etc., to talk with his server – I went with AsyncLabs WiShield to put my power meter onto the network – my backend to get the data to the server is also a bit different (but of course).

The basic idea of the project is that an Arduino Duemilanove is continuously reading the analog pins that a couple TED Current Tranducers are connected to (one per phase). The Arduino does a little smoothing/averaging of the data and waits for an IP connection to send that data out on. Another machine has a Win32 service running on it and every minute it queries the power meter for its current data; the data that is received is stuffed into a MySQL data base. When a web request comes in to view the data a few pre-canned charts are generated real time and returned to the web user’s browser.

via [SlackLab]