Archive for the ‘Wireless’ Category

Browser book-marks brought alive using RFID

Saturday, May 5th, 2012

A device that opens the websites using physical world interaction? This is a step closer to the internet of things. Using our beloved Arduino and RFID tags, we can think of a lot many applications of this device!

Too lazy to create your own Arduino + RFID reader? No fear! Arduino internet Gizmo is here.

A detailed Step-by-step making instruction is given here.

What websites are you going to keep as your shortcuts today? :)

Via:[TheVerge]

The famed @MBTweetFleet tweets using Arduino

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

In case you have been following MBTweetFleet and availing awesome parking spaces, you would be happy to know that the service was made using an Arduino and GPS/GPRS shield.

The cars automatically generated a tweet with GPS data out of every empty parking space they passed. Via Arduino the onboard electronics were connected to a GPS/GPRS-Shield. Tweets were generated with a PHP Relay which sent the GPS-Data. This is how people could find empty parking spaces near them on twitter and even be navigated there by a linked Google map

[Via: http://awards.jvm-neckar.de]

Easy cross platform configurator for XBee modules

Thursday, March 8th, 2012

Italian company “moltosenso” has released a free, cross-platform software that allows you to configure all the parameters of your XBee modules. (more…)

Social Fuel For Your Car: Travel With A Little Help From Your Friends

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

Impressing automotive hacking lets this FIAT car moving by the number of “like” from the Guarana Antarctica Facebook Fan Page. The advertising idea is simple: let the social audience support this Sau Paulo to Salvador trip to reach the Carnivalby commenting / “liking” the page. The onboard Arduino ADK (connected to a tablet and the internet) allows the car going on by a certain amount of meters (apparently one “like” is 10 meters, while each comment lets the car go ahead for 20 meters).

(more…)

Ball of Dub Keeps Audio in Your Hands

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Ball of Dub from LUSTlab on Vimeo.

Accelerometer to Renoise via OSC  to control trippy and dubby sounds.

[Lizzie] from LustLab sent in her Ball of Dub that turns a few accelerometer and a digital audio workstation and turns everything into an aural experience of wubs and dubs. The Ball of Dub can turn just about anything into dubstep, and does so with a fairly interesting user interface.

There isn’t a build log for the Ball of Dub, but  the folks at LustLab did send in a basic overview of her project. Inside the ball, there’s a Razor IMU from Sparkfun that is attached to the ever-popular XBee wireless transceiver. A tiny program on an Arduino calibrates the gyroscope and accelerometer and sends that data to the DAW at 50Hz.

The host computer is running Renoise, a very popular tracker that can accept MIDI and OSC input. A Processing app parses the ball spin, free fall and impact, averages them over a period of time, and pipes that into the OSC input of Renoise. In [Lizzie]‘s video, the ball spin is sent to a low-pass filter on the baseline track, and the average impact is applied to the vocal track.

via [HackADay] source [LustLab Tumblr] special demo video for the few skeptical comments on HackADay

Arduino, iPod and RFID make beautiful, handicapped-accessible music together

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

Terrence O’Bien posts a clean music interface (no menus / no buttons)  based on RFID, as previously seen some time ago.

There isn’t actually much new about this awesome DIY project, but it’s the way it brings the various parts together that has us impressed. Designed by Instructables user XenonJohn, with help from software developer David Findlay, the Magic Music Table RFID was designed to let a disable child (or other such handicapped user) select albums to play back from an iPod touch playlist. The iPod is connected to anArduino, which tells the device to start playing a particular track based on a selection made with RFIDcards. The whole setup is built into a coffee table and the RFID tags are sandwiched inside clear plastic blocks with the album art. You can see it in action in the video after the break and, if you’ve got the patience and skill, you can build your own using the directions at the source link.

via [Engadget] source [Instructables]


Retro Pinball Clock Hack

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

[Alan Amon] posted a cool vintage hack on Instructables, adding GPS-based clock funcionalities to a Bally Wizard pinball.

Pinball machine will automatically power up at the preset time each day and then resets to display the current time, the year, the time the alarm is set for and the date month/day. Then as long as the GPS has a signal the time will update once a minute for the rest of the day.  At the time you would like to go to bed the Arduino will cut power to the game and it will remain off until the alarm time. Should you have a power failure in the night the machine will not lose it’s settings. If power is restored prior to the alarm time the machine will wake up as normal, otherwise the machine will wake up once power is restored.

If the game is powered on because it is not yet bed time and it is after the alarm time then at 12am, 1am or 1pm the game will do a full reset. This makes sure the clock hasn’t gotten off due to a stuck score reel, keeps the time in a 12 hour format and keeps the date display up to date.

Have a look at the “cool features” and “coolest features” in the instructables article

via [PCWorld] source [Instructables]

Listening To The Walls’ Whispers

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

[Pierre] shares an interesting geo-localization project of sound, narration and  culture,  made in  “plan d’Aou”, a district of Marseilles – France. The project dates back in September 2010, within the framework of the Smala project in order to trace a sound cartography of Islam in the city of Marseilles: the guys at [Echelle Inconnue] took their time to fully document the all project with schematics, codes, fritzing diagrams and so on.

Several mobile systems were distributed to the people to accompany their walk across the district with, by hand, a kind of speaker to be press on the walls which makes it possible to listen to the sound by vibrating the material of the wall.

The materials of urban furniture or buildings become the speakers required for sound diffusion. Each resonant body had its acoustic specificities, the words take shape in metal, wood or glass… Textures of the sound fluctuate from a surface to another and the listener must juggle with these characteristics to obtain a quality of optimal listening, between documentary in the walls and poetic sound creation.

source [echelleinconnue]

Arduino Powered 2.4 GHz Spectrum Analyzer Lets You

Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

Arduino forum user [Blibo] shares its 2.4 Ghz spectrum analyzer project on the forum. The project is based on the CYWM6935 board (wireless), an Atmega 328 and a Nokia 5110 LCD-

I finished the (mostly) permanent version of my 2.4ghz spectrum analyzer, and soldered it up. I included 3 modes for scanning (fast, slow, and ghost – like the long exposure on a camera), plus a function to display the voltage on an analog pin, and graph it (for when the oscilloscope’s not cooperating). These modes are toggled through by hitting the big push button [...] I have already used it to help setup my wireless network, (channel, location, things that cause interference), and it is always interesting to see what uses the 2.4ghz spectrum. So far, the things that I’ve noticed on the spectrum while walking around with the analyzer are: 
-microwave ovens (huge disturbance in the middle of the spectrum)
-Wifi 
-Cordless phones
-Bluetooth
-Wireless keyboard
-Wireless speakers
The fast mode is ok for seeing EMI, but for digital signals, the slow mode is best. The ghost mode also gives a general idea of spectrum use over a period of time.

via [HackADay] source(code) on [Arduino Forum]

Arduino Labs opens its “doors”

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

Today we open Arduino Labs, a new website we have been working on for a few weeks that will allow us to post documentation about projects we are working on that are not ready to be “official” yet.

We want to have a more open development process within the Arduino project and this is one of the many steps that are getting us there.

Another function of Labs is to bring closer to Arduino a number of projects made by members of the community that we want to make more official and easier to find.

There are a lot of libraries, for example, developed by great people that sometimes are hard to find or the original maintainer stops working on them at some point. With Labs we’ll be able to create a permanent home for those libraries and give space on our gihub for that code.

This is just the beginning but we already have a couple of great projects for you:

Android/Arduino ADK tool for Processing

a set of tools that let you develop Android accessories with Arduino using only the Processing language without having to learn how to program the Android API in Eclipse. We believe this will make it much simpler for people to make use of the power of the Arduino ADK board

Arduino GSM Shield

In the last few months we have been working with the great people at Telefonica I+D in Spain on the design of a GPRS shield for Arduino. We made a few prototypes that have been used in a Hackaton we ran with Telefonica in Spain on the 17 of july. The pages on Labs provide the initial documentation for the prototypes and open the door to more work to be done to make the product ready for everybody.

We hope you appreciate this new tool and please send us feedback or propose projects at labs@arduino.cc