Archive for the ‘Wireless’ Category

An open robot shield for Arduino

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Open Electronics‘ staff were looking for a common and standard hardware platform usable on different robots they were working on. Their goal was to find a single platform that had to provide power supply to the microcontroller, it had to provide stabilized voltage for the servos, and, finally, it had to be equipped with an obstacle detector and with an IR receiver.

Having chosen Arduino as the target core board, they developed an ad-hoc shield meeting all these requirements, whose detailed description can be found here, together with the BOM and a lot of source code.

[Via: Open Electronics]

RC remotes and Arduino: a tutorial

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

Nick Poole, from SparkFun, proposes this nice tutorial, where detailed instructions on how to connect a radio-controlled (RC) remote to an Arduino board are described in great details.

RC remotes are very simple controller, typically used to wirelessly control electrical rovers, cars and planes. Depending on the number of degrees of freedom required by the application (e.g., X and Y movement), an equivalent number of channels is provided by the remote, that can be easily connected to Arduino’s digital pins.

More information and some sample sketches can be found here.

[Via: SparkFun]

 

WISP: a WiFi module for the Internet-of-Things

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

embdSocial™ is an Internet-of-Things (IoT) platform usable to provide communication support to smart objects and devices. embdSocial™ is based on WISP™, an electronic module that can be connected to any microcontroller-equipped device (such as an Arduino board, by means of ad-hoc shield) to exploit several communication services:

Each WISP™ allows real-time bi-directional communication through our secure, globally accessible API. In addition to merely providing internet connectivity, embdSocial™ provides one interface and architecture that simplifies common tasks through the use of plug-ins:

  • Tweeting/receiving @messages
  • Updating Facebook statuses
  • Sending/receiving emails
  • Sending/receiving SMS text messages
  • Manipulating files in your Dropbox

Each WISP™ is equipped with a 802.11 network interface (with support to WEP, WPA and WPA2 protocols) which allows the device to be easily connected with the embdSocial™’s servers; moreover, its configuration is completely web-based.

More information can be found on the embdSocial™ homepage, together with a couple of videos presenting its capabilities.

[Via: HackADay and embdSocial]

Arduino based Quadrotor on a PCB

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

There are many Quadrotor Projects out there. But, they require a hobbyist to deal with the Frame Designing (Mechanical), a bit of Microcontroller knowledge as well as dealing with the Motor Control (Power Electronics). You may purchase a commercial Radio and a readymade Kit for flying. But, to Do-It-Yourself, is an achievement in itself.

4pcb Quad

Here is a picture of a Quadrotor designed by Shane Colton using Arduino Pro mini as its flying brain. Shane is a Ph.D Student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. On being asked about the Project, he replied:

I heard about Arduino some time in 2007/2008 and have used it for a few projects since then. I built the quadrotor for fun / hobby (not related to research). I wanted to build my own (quadrotor) from scratch because I could integrate all the parts onto a single circuit board, and because I like designing the control system myself.

(more…)

Arduino gets 3G connectivity

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Libelium, with its open source hardware division of Cooking Hacks has come out with a new 3G module for arduino.

The new 3G shield for Arduino enables connectivity to high speed WCDMA and HSPA cellular networks allowing transfers up to 7.2Mbps (20 times faster than with GPRS technology). The module also counts with an internal GPS that enables the location of any Arduino both outdoors and indoors, combining standard positioning data from satellites with mobile cell triangulation in the assisted mobile mode (A-GPS).

The new Arduino 3G module also includes a small camera for video recording in high resolution and a complete audio interface that enables Arduino to run with all the functionalities of a smartphone device.

And just to remind our readers about cooking hacks? They were the people who created the XBee shield for arduino.

Further information regarding this new 3G/GPRS module can be found here.

Via:[EMSnow, cooking-hacks, memristor]

Arduino, GPS and Display i2C…

Friday, May 25th, 2012

 

En este nuevo tutorial Arduino by ARDUTEKA, estudiamos a fondo los módulos GPS, en concreto los módulos diseñados por LIBELIUM, para aprender a extraer y comprender todas las tramadas de datos que recibimos de los GPS y posteriormente, tratar esa información para mostrar en un display con bus i2C datos como la latitud, longitud, altura y hora UTC…

 

 

[Via: Arduteka]

 

 

Alarma DIY con Módulo 3G, Cámara, Ultrasonidos, Teclado Matricial & Led RGB

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

Arduteka lanza su último tutorial!

En él nos descubre el nuevo módulo 3G para Arduino de Cooking Hacks con el que podremos construir una divertida alarma que nos enviará la foto de nuestro intruso directamente a nuestro correo, además de avisarnos por un mensaje sms a nuestro teléfono móvil sin necesidad de tener conectado nuestro Arduino a internet constantemente, pues lo hace todo a través de la red móvil.

Vamos a construirnos una alarma totalmente casera, a través del sensor de ultrasonidos, escanearemos continuamente el espacio situado enfrente suyo con un radio aproximado de 30º, cuando algún objeto o persona se sitúe en su campo de actuación a una distancia inferior a la que establezcamos, haremos sonar una alarma, tomaremos una fotografía, el Led RGB que antes estaba verde, pasará a color azul y daremos 10 segundos para poder desactivar la alarma a través de nuestro teclado matricial, si la desactivamos, volverá de nuevo a escanear el campo, pero si no!! Reproducirá un sonido contundente y se dispondrá a mandarnos un sms a nuestro teléfono móvil y la fotografía a nuestro correo electrónico.

Via:[Arduteka]

 

DIY Radio Control

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Going to buy a new Wireless Controller for your next Robotics project. Why buy a new one when you can Do-It-Yourself? All you need is an Arduino, an old Joystick with a Gameport (15-pin connector) and a pair of Series 1 xBee Modules.

The explanation of the xBee Configuration and the xBee Packet Description is very well done at the blog.

Block Diagram

Transmitter: Joystick + xBee [No additional hardware needed]
Receiver: xBee + Arduino + [your amazing Robot, Car or a Plane!]

Schematic

 

The age of the invisible steering wheel

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

A Nintendo Wii-remote along with bluetooth communication and an arduino gives us this magical cart with a wireless steering wheel.

These cool people are staunch DIY-ers and would love to see the community build more such vehicles.

The cart has two motors which use a chain to drive each of the rear wheels. A pair of H-bridge controllers let the Arduino interface with them. It’s also has a Bluetooth module that makes it a snap to pull accelerometer data from the Wii remote. The front end looks like it uses rack and pinion steering, but you won’t find a pinion or a steering column. Instead, a linear actuator is mounted parallel to the rack, moving it back and forth at the command of the Arduino.

The only downside I spot is the Battery life. I am sure that would be worked out too! Till then – Kudos to the inventors! I smell futuristic looking vehicle controls here. :)

Via:[Hackaday, NewsFactor]

Bluetooth communications between Arduino and Android: an introduction

Monday, May 7th, 2012

John Boxall of Tronixstuff has written a very interesting tutorial article on his blog about how to connect any Android-based smartphone with an Arduino board, by means of Seeedstudio’s Bluetooth Bee and a promising, yet simple – open-source Android application, named BlueTerm, which provides RFCOMM/SPP serial communication capabilities.

In this introductory video, John shows how to wirelessly turn on and off Arduino’s digital pin with his setup.

Read more on Tronixstuff.

Via:[Seeedstudio Blog]