Archive for the ‘Bluetooth’ Category

DIY Air Quality Sensing from HabitatMap and Sonoma Tech

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

 

High-precision air quality monitors are normally very expensive, but Tim Dye of Sonoma Technology is on a mission to change that.  He’s been working with Michael Heimbinder and habitatmap.org to create a low-cost sensor system that when designed properly and integrated into a software platforms can provide valid data.

AirCasting is a platform for recording, mapping, and sharing health and environmental data using Arduino and Android. It combines an Arduino with a set of sensors for air quality measurement; temperature, humidity, and carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and particulate matter. The system combines the sensors using an Arduino Uno and then sends the data to an Android app using Bluetooth. The plans are all open for modification, so you can add your own sensors as needed. A heart rate monitor and an LED vest can also be linked to the AirCasting app, providing a complete the system for realtime, wearable feedback of your body’s reaction to the environmental air quality.

There are many DIY air quality measurement projects online, but most of them are not calibrated against known standards or professional equipment. But Dye and his colleagues have tested the AirCasting particulate matter sensors against the same equipment Sonoma Technology uses for precise measurement, and they’ve gotten surprisingly good results. Correctly constructed and deployed, the AirCasting shows promise as a low-cost alternative to complement the expensive high-end air monitors.

AirCasting is a collaboration between many groups:  Michael Heimbinder of habitatmap.org manages the project, and Tim Dye of Sonoma Technology consults on design, data evaluation, and field deployment; Dr. Iem Heng and Raymond Yap of the City Tech Mechatronics Technology Center designed and built the hardware; Dr. Andy Zhang designed and built the monitor casings; Valentine Leung designed and built the LED garments, and Brooke Singer has helped guided the project with a mind towards interactivity and public engagement.

The data from your AirCasting air monitor can be uploaded to the AirCasting database, which aggregates data from all AirCasting contributors, or can be sent to your own database and all the code for the project is open source and available through GitHub

The website AirCasting.org provides links to all the software and hardware plans.

An Arduino-controlled RGB lamp

Saturday, January 12th, 2013

On his blog, Miguel presents one of his latest projects:

This project shows the operation of an RGB lamp using a digital LED strip. After activating the bluetooth connection, the user can open the GUI on the PC to control the lamp. The program shows a hue palette divided into 30 rods, one for each LED of the strip.
By clicking & dragging the mouse cursor it is possible to make your own patterns,. To remove a color, the user can simply click on a rod while pressing the spacebar, which switches off the selected LED.

Part list: wooden support, RGB digitally-addressable LED strip, microcontroller (Arduino Pro Mini, for example), Bluetooth or USB wire.

More information on this project can be found on Miguel’s blog, while a brief video about its operation can be found here; the code of the project can be found on Github. The project’s page on Thingiverse can be found here.

[Via: Miguel's blog]

 

The age of the invisible steering wheel

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

A Nintendo Wii-remote along with bluetooth communication and an arduino gives us this magical cart with a wireless steering wheel.

These cool people are staunch DIY-ers and would love to see the community build more such vehicles.

The cart has two motors which use a chain to drive each of the rear wheels. A pair of H-bridge controllers let the Arduino interface with them. It’s also has a Bluetooth module that makes it a snap to pull accelerometer data from the Wii remote. The front end looks like it uses rack and pinion steering, but you won’t find a pinion or a steering column. Instead, a linear actuator is mounted parallel to the rack, moving it back and forth at the command of the Arduino.

The only downside I spot is the Battery life. I am sure that would be worked out too! Till then – Kudos to the inventors! I smell futuristic looking vehicle controls here. :)

Via:[Hackaday, NewsFactor]

Bluetooth communications between Arduino and Android: an introduction

Monday, May 7th, 2012

John Boxall of Tronixstuff has written a very interesting tutorial article on his blog about how to connect any Android-based smartphone with an Arduino board, by means of Seeedstudio’s Bluetooth Bee and a promising, yet simple – open-source Android application, named BlueTerm, which provides RFCOMM/SPP serial communication capabilities.

In this introductory video, John shows how to wirelessly turn on and off Arduino’s digital pin with his setup.

Read more on Tronixstuff.

Via:[Seeedstudio Blog]

Light Drive: Light Painting With Arduino

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011

[Kim Pimmel] made nice light-painting stop-motion animations using an Arduino Bluetooth, Processing and some post-production.

The video is stop motion, so every frame is an individually shot photograph. Each photograph is a long exposure photo, with exposures reaching up to 20 seconds in some cases.

To control the lights, I used an Arduino controlled via bluetooth to drive a stepper motor. The stepper motor controls the movements of the lights remotely from Processing.

via [Pimmel's Vimeo] more on [Flickr]

Accordion Playing Midi Under 100$

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

Amazing Accordion sending MIDI under 100$ (instead of 6,699.00$), as [Dmitry Yegorenkov] shares on Arduino Forum and published on GitHub.

I like to play accordion & have a dog. People say dogs are singing with squeezeboxes and some people find it funny. Not for me. I know that my pet hears note harmonics much better then me & suffers from high pitches very much. I could not really practice at home just because of humanennes. That sucks. I like to play accordion. Programmers see cycle here. Let’s get out.

THIS IS IT.
It plays to headphones, produces MIDI output, etc. etc. It costs $6,699.00 on e-bay (buy now offer) on November 17, 2010. In the US I can buy Peugeot Partner for the same price. In Ukraine where i live both are 1/2 times more expensive. For that money i’ll get beautiful device to practice at home and no service centers available within 400Km radius. Weird.

Code and Schematics-ready on [Accordion Mega's Github]

Introducing Squirt, The Water Gun RobotIntroducing Squirt, The Water Gun RobotIntroducing Squirt, The Water Gun Robot

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010

Squirt is an autonomous robot which can communicate with an Android phone. Optionally, the phone can be used as a controller to drive the robot. Squirt’s purpose is to water plants and chase away raccoons. It’s also a technology demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a smart phone to control small irrigation and well systems.

Squirt is an autonomous robot which can communicate with an Android phone. Optionally, the phone can be used as a controller to drive the robot. Squirt’s purpose is to water plants and chase away raccoons. It’s also a technology demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a smart phone to control small irrigation and well systems.

Squirt is an autonomous robot which can communicate with an Android phone. Optionally, the phone can be used as a controller to drive the robot. Squirt’s purpose is to water plants and chase away raccoons. It’s also a technology demonstration to prove the feasibility of using a smart phone to control small irrigation and well systems.

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Android using NES controller from Android and Bluesmirf (Bluetooth)

Monday, September 13th, 2010

 

 

In this video [sketchsk3tch] youtube user plays Super Mario on a HTC EVO, using a NES controller.

This is a project I did using an Arduino and a Bluesmirf bluetooth module so I could control my NES emulator on my EVO with an NES controller.

more info after the break

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Amarino 2.0 toolkit is out!

Friday, June 11th, 2010

as Make says, Amarino turned to the next (2.0) stage. This news is a challenge to all of us to new, immersive, android-mobile-oriented scenarios. any iPhone answers?

Many new features in Amarino 2.0

  • control multiple bluetooth devices in parallel
  • visual feedback for events sent from the phone
  • plug-in concept to integrate your own events with Amarino (and using its visualizer for feedback)
  • support for Android 1.x and 2.x devices
  • introduces a Android library to talk to Amarino from your own app
  • much clearer code

source [Amarino official site]

iPhone, Arduino & Flash CS5

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

[Martin Lihs] connected the iPhone to an Arduino via bluetooth and a socket server in between. No code supplied yet. We’ll check it out for you ;)