Archive for the ‘Wearable Computing’ Category

Announcing a collaboration with Adafruit: Arduino Gemma

Saturday, October 4th, 2014
ArduinoGemma

Arduino Gemma preview – Final board coming late autumn

During his saturday morning presentation at Maker Faire Rome, Massimo Banzi gave a preview of a new collaboration and a new board: Adafruit Gemma becomes officially Arduino Gemma, a tiny but powerful wearable microcontroller board in a 27mm diameter package.

Powered by an Attiny85 and programmable with the Arduino IDE over USB, anyone will be able to easily create wearable projects with all the advantages of being part of the Arduino family. The board will be default-supported in the Arduino IDE, equipped with an on/off switch and a microUSB connector.

gemmapresentatio2

gemmapresentation

 

 

 

 

 

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Sew electric with Leah Buechley – Interview

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

sew electric

Leah Buechley, the creator of the LilyPad Arduino and my former advisor, recently published a great new book based on that platform, together with Kanjun Qiu and Sonja de Boer. Sew Electric is a collection of DIY e-textile projects that introduce electronics and programming through textile crafts. The projects include a sparkling bracelet, a singing monster, a light-up bookmark, and a fabric piano. Through these activities, readers are introduced to the fundamentals of electronics and programming as well as craft and design practices. The projects are beautifully illustrated and the instructions are clear and detailed. This is a wonderful resource for showing potential uses of electronics and the Arduino platform, specifically in ways that appeal to audiences not traditionally associated with these technologies.

I was privileged to work with Leah for a number of years and am always impressed with her dedication, ideals, and accomplishments. Zoe and I put together this interview to ask Leah about the new book and her thoughts on technology:

How was the idea of the book born and what’s its main aim?

We want the book to get people excited about electronics and programming. We hope it will help people play, tinker, hack, and learn.

There are very few engineering resources that are appealing to young women and girls. We wanted to create an electronics introduction that looks and feels different from anything else that’s out there.

In terms of the history, my student Kanjun Qiu built a series of lovely LilyPad projects & wrote DIY tutorials for them for her master’s thesis. In collaboration with NCWIT (the National Center for Women and Information Technology), we tested the tutorials with kids and teachers and got lots of positive feedback. We decided to publish the series as a book and website to make them more visible and accessible. We’d like to connect to as many people as possible.

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Measuring pollution and health: wearable project wins a prize

Thursday, July 11th, 2013

Lead Inventor David Kuller wearing the winning Conscious ClothingTM prototype

My Air, My Health was the title of a Challenge calling innovators to work on a wearable project integrating air-quality measurement with heart rate and breathing.

The promoters of the challenge, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Services (NIH), launched it because they think that the possibility of understanding the relations between air pollution and people’s health in real-time could have an important impact in preventing disease and illness in the population. In the description you can read:

The required system design must be capable of linking air pollutant concentrations with physiological data, providing geocoded and time-stamped files in an easy to use format, and transmitting this data via existing networks to a central data repository. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of this challenge, solvers are highly encouraged to form teams drawing on multiple relevant expertise… (more…)

Some notes from the Smart Textiles Salon

Tuesday, June 25th, 2013

smart textile salon

Smart Textiles Salon was the last event of the Smart Textiles Week organized by the Textile department of the University of Ghent in the beautiful town of Ghent, in Belgium at the beginning of June:

Smart Textiles Salon is an attempt to bring topical research in the field of Smart Textiles to the stage and showcase it to the world. We wanted to make clear that Smart Textiles are not only existing in research projects, but that the potential for market introduction is huge already today. This should be recognized and taken to the next level.

Our friends Riccardo Marchesi (Inntex and Plug&wear) and Giulia Tomasello (Ruah project), took part to the event and sent us a short report  highlighting with words and pictures some cool projects they encountered during the days at the Salon.

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Visual report of “Arduino meets wearables” workshop in Berlin

Friday, May 10th, 2013

arduino meets wearables

Yesterday we spent 8 hours learning and experimenting with Arduino Lilypad and 20 cool participants during our workshop, organized in collaboration with Kobakant! Here you can take a look at some pictures and below a  short video report made by Makerfaire Rome crew.

 

 

Are you working at a wearable project and you want to share it with us? Join us on Arduino Projects Flickr group, we are looking for nice projects to feature on this blog.

An interactive corset teaching you how to breathe

Saturday, April 27th, 2013

ruah

RUAH is an interactive corset powered by Arduino Lilypad and created by Giulia Tomasello for her BA graduation project. Its main aim is to help people into learning the importance and the benefits of a deep diaphragmatic breathing.

The circuit is composed by a sensor sewn on an elastic belt and an actuator placed inside the corset.
The stretch sensor catches the move of diaphragmatic breath and sends a feedback from Lilypad to muscle wire, a flexinol spring, inflating and deforming the centre of the structure.
Through this interaction between user and bustier, user becomes conscious about his body and his
breathe, increasing his sensory abilities and his physical endurance.
The slow controlled breathing, which balances body and mind, is acquired only after a long workout.
As the wearer feels it like a real second skin, RUAH transmits and receives emotional feedback, contrasting a continuous sense of stillness and movement, opposite feelings that surround us and join up to ecstasy.

ruah

ruah circuit

 

If you are interested in checking out the details of the project, you can explore Giulia’s pictures of the work in progress and her github code repository, after watching the video below with the Ruah in action!

 

 

Beat Feet: set your beats and effects with gestures using Arduino

Saturday, April 13th, 2013

 

bare feet

One of the teams participating to the MIT Media Labs Design Innovation workshop at PESIT Bangalore last January built something called  Beat Feet using Arduino Uno:

We designed a system which will allow musicians, guitarists and keyboardists to set the beats according to the music they play, without getting up from their place or even without lifting their hands off the instrument! Yes, simply by tapping foot at a constant rate. Don’t believe it?

Beat Feet allows musicians to add drum and guitar effects  using only feet gestures and wearable sensors. Check the details of the project on this website and watch the video below to see it in action!

Wearable soundscape from Canada

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

BioCircuit by Dana Ramler

 

I’m reblogging from Core77 this interesting wearable project because I’d like to highlight the using of Arduino Lilypad board:

Bio Circuit stems from our concern for ethical design and the creation of media-based interactions that reveal human interdependence with the environment. With each beat of the heart, Bio Circuit connects the wearer with the inner workings of their body.

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Wear Your Musical Interface

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Ruffletron is a prototype of a wearable musical interface and an experiment in performative interaction.

The project has been developed by a textile designer, Lara Grant, in collaboration with the sound engineer Cullen Miller.

 

For prototyping purpose, Lara used a LilyPad Arduino, Maxuino, Osculator and Ableton Live.

Project details here.

 

 

Wearable Fabric on the Arduino Store

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

We are happy to announce the first wearable kit on the Arduino Store . This kit has been made by Plug’n’Wear specifically for us. All fabrics in this kit are produced in Italy, and strongly related to a textile family business. If you want to get deeper into the story of this product have a look at Riccardo Marchesi presentation (still in Italian, soon to be traslated!) at World Wide Rome 2012.

Read over for Kit’s features

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