Archive for the ‘tutorials’ Category

DIY Radio Control

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Going to buy a new Wireless Controller for your next Robotics project. Why buy a new one when you can Do-It-Yourself? All you need is an Arduino, an old Joystick with a Gameport (15-pin connector) and a pair of Series 1 xBee Modules.

The explanation of the xBee Configuration and the xBee Packet Description is very well done at the blog.

Block Diagram

Transmitter: Joystick + xBee [No additional hardware needed]
Receiver: xBee + Arduino + [your amazing Robot, Car or a Plane!]

Schematic

 

MAKEmatics – Mathematics for Makers

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

Makers need to familiarize themselves with the core concepts and the theory involved in creating applications such as Motion Sensing and Face Tracking. As the technology is churning out new hardware day and night, DIYers need to work hard to keep up and always be in touch with the latest technology around them.

For example, anyone working with Accelerometers/ Gyroscopes or Inertial Measurement Units needs to understand the theory of Vectors, Force, Gravity and be able to work out complex mathematical problems. They may easily get an Arduino Board and an Accelerometer Breakout or an IMU Board and use a library instead of writing their own code but to truly understand the theory behind it; how the device actually works, is not for the faint of heart.

 

One such problem is the Face Tracking Application. Unless you know the real theory behind how the Algorithm actually works, you can only wonder about that robot which follows its master. Greg Borenstein had an idea of creating a website dedicated to this issue. Makematics – Math for Makers.

 

In an introductory post, Greg writes:

” I hope to show that a normal programmer with no special academic training can grapple with these areas of research and find a way in to understanding them. And as I go I aim to create material that will help others do the same. If I can do it, there’s no reason you can’t.”

More and more people should step forward and create or compile a good amount of research data to help fellow makers and DIYers in solving complex mathematical problems.

Control your dreams using DIY goggles

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

Lucid dream is a state in which you can control what you dream. Be it winning a million bucks worth lottery, or dating your favorite cine star, it is possible to control your dreams using these DIY goggles!

Simple to build and a nice weekend hack for the bored, these goggles are pretty cost effective and impressive. Put together a pair of glasses, LED, Arduino, a battery and some other minor paraphernalia and you are ready to live your favorite dream in your resting time!

Via:[Hackaday, Madscientist]

Arduino ‘Simon says’ game

Friday, February 24th, 2012

A simple and a fun Simon says game re-created is using an Arduino in the following instructable.

Materials Needed:

- Arduino
- Bread Board
- Jumper Wires
- 4 different colored LEDs
- 4 100 Ohm Resistors
- 4 Push Buttons
- Small Speaker

It is a good exercise to practice interfacing multiple buttons and LEDs. Can be tried even by an arduino beginner.

[Via: Instructables]

Circuit Milling With Roland iModela, Now Available on Arduino Store

Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

[Enrico Bassi] from FablabTorino brought to the extent the use of the Roland iModela, using the little (and inexpensive) desktop milling machine for pcb milling.  (in the picture we milled the overexposed Fritzing Parking Assistant).

He wrote some Scuola Lessons (here’s the first) to explain how he realized the pcb, starting from Fritzing.

Roland iModela is now on sell on the Arduino Store.

source [FablabTorino]

Connecting your Arduino to AIR using an AIR Native Extension

Monday, December 5th, 2011

[quetwo] aka Nicholas Kwiatkowski developed a native interface to receive serial data in Flash.

[...]  The AIR Native Extension (ANE) is a C based .DLL / .framework for the Windows/Mac platforms that allows AIR to essentially open a COM port.  I wrote it in a way that is supposed to emulate the functions of the flash.net.Socket library that is included in the AIR runtime.  I’ve posted the entire project, including the source code and final binaries on Google Code at http://code.google.com/p/as3-arduino-connector/

via [quetwo], [GoogleCode]

Der Kritzler, An Automatic Scribbling Machine

Monday, September 5th, 2011

[Alex Weber] put together a motorized drawing machine painting 2d Vector Graphics on his office’s glasses.

An automatic scribbling machine sounds less than useful, admittedly, but it’s really just the style of line created by this motorized drawing machine. It’s reminiscent of ASCII art, in which heavier characters are used to create darker tones; in this case, the more jiggle added to the drawing platform, the more ink is put on the drawing surface. It’s kind of mesmerizing.

via [techCrunch] source & assembly [tinkerLog]

Floppy DrawBot Makes Cool Patterns

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

Stuart and I wanted to design a project that would be a good introduction to upcycling electronics, robotics, arduino, art with maths/code. We came up with a drawing robot based on an old floppy drive.

made your own [instructables] via Matthew Venn & Sturat Childs @ [Bristol Hackerspace]

Build Your Own Undersea Robot

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

David Schneider from [IEEEspectrum] tells and shares his DIY Remotely Operated Vehicle undersea, based on two Arduinos

Last year at about this time, crews in the Gulf of Mexico were working feverishly to bring BP’s blown-out oil well under control. Some of the more spectacular parts of that effort, as you may recall, involved the use of remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs. Perhaps you had the same thought as I did—that it would be cool to build one.

And shares all the instructions to build your own [.zip].

via [IEEESpectrum]

Fai Un Contachilometri Con Arduino! [Wired]

Wednesday, July 20th, 2011

Riportiamo qui di seguito il tutorial su come realizzare il proprio contachilometri, pubblicato su Wired di Giugno. A realizzarlo sono stati due membri della community: Vittorio Zuccalà con il supporto di Enkel Bici. Per realizzarlo hanno usato una Arduino Uno, un SD shield di Sparkfun e una Reed Switch (sostituibile anche da un Hall Sensor).

L’idea è semplice: tramite arduino si visualizza la velocità di punta e la velocità media su un display 16X2.
Per contare i giri della ruota abbiamo utilizzato un reed switch. Questo sensore si comporta come un interruttore: esso rimane normalmente aperto (e quindi non passa corrente); arduino lo vede come un segnale digitale LOW.
Quando passa un magnete vicino (posizionato sui raggi della ruota), il sensore si chiude facendo passare corrente; in questo modo restituisce un HIGH digitale ad arduino riconosce il passaggio del magnete; il tempo trascorso tra un passaggio e l’altro ci permette di calcolare la velocità istantanea (e successivamente quella media) e, conoscendo il raggio della ruota, si può calcolare il numero di metri percorsi.

[set su Flickr] via [VittorioZuccalà Blog]