Archive for the ‘tutorials’ Category

RC remotes and Arduino: a tutorial

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

Nick Poole, from SparkFun, proposes this nice tutorial, where detailed instructions on how to connect a radio-controlled (RC) remote to an Arduino board are described in great details.

RC remotes are very simple controller, typically used to wirelessly control electrical rovers, cars and planes. Depending on the number of degrees of freedom required by the application (e.g., X and Y movement), an equivalent number of channels is provided by the remote, that can be easily connected to Arduino’s digital pins.

More information and some sample sketches can be found here.

[Via: SparkFun]

 

Massimo Introduces Arduino Leonardo

Monday, July 23rd, 2012

In this video Massimo explains the Arduino Leonardo, talking about its differences with Arduino UNO and playing around with its mouse & keyboard features.

If you want to have a closer look to the latest arrival in the Arduino Family click here, if you want to follow Massimo’s project click here. Arduino Leonardo comes in two different flavours: with headers and without headers.

Arduino and the LTC2440 24bit ADC

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Have you ever wondered how to improve the resolution of analog readings of your Arduino board? If yes, this is for you.

John Beale, discussing on the Dangerous Prototypes’ forum, quickly describes how to connect a Linear’s LTC2440 ADC to an Arduino board, which will provide you with an amazing 24 bit resolution.

The ADC, which is available in a SSOP package, can be connected to the Arduino via the SPI bus. Here John provides a brief sketch and some very useful comments to make it working properly.

[Via: Dangerous Prototypes]

Quick tutorial: current sensing for DC motors

Friday, June 15th, 2012

On her blog, Dustyn Roberts presents her own experience on current sensing for controlling DC electric motors with an Arduino board and an Arduino Motor Shield. This shield, based on a L298 H-bridge, provides two current sensing pins to the user, which can be used to measure the instantaneous current absorpion by each H-bridge. After some trials, Dustyn managed to have a quite clear picture of the absorption behavior of the DC motor:

Sample code and updates can be found on Dustyn’s blog.

[Via: Dustyn's blog]

Tutorial: accurate ADC readings

Friday, June 8th, 2012

Hardware Hacking guys propose this quick tutorial on how to improve the accuracy of Arduino’s ADC readings, by measuring the actual voltage rail used to supply the onboard microcontroller. At a glance, this can be done by measuring the internal 1.1V reference voltage (it is available for ATMega 168 and ATMega 328 only) and, then, by normalizing the ADC readings.

More details can be found here.

[Via: Hardware Hacking]

Arduino based Quadrotor on a PCB

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

There are many Quadrotor Projects out there. But, they require a hobbyist to deal with the Frame Designing (Mechanical), a bit of Microcontroller knowledge as well as dealing with the Motor Control (Power Electronics). You may purchase a commercial Radio and a readymade Kit for flying. But, to Do-It-Yourself, is an achievement in itself.

4pcb Quad

Here is a picture of a Quadrotor designed by Shane Colton using Arduino Pro mini as its flying brain. Shane is a Ph.D Student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. On being asked about the Project, he replied:

I heard about Arduino some time in 2007/2008 and have used it for a few projects since then. I built the quadrotor for fun / hobby (not related to research). I wanted to build my own (quadrotor) from scratch because I could integrate all the parts onto a single circuit board, and because I like designing the control system myself.

(more…)

Publishing data on the web with Node.JS

Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

Many solutions exist for publishing data coming from Arduino boards on the web. , in his detailed tutorial, proposes his novel approach, which makes use of several widespread and open-source technologies, such as Node.JS, jQuery and Apache:

Using the USB, the Arduino Board is connected to the PC serially to a certain COM port which the OS allocates. Node.JS, the asynchronous server side JavaScript engine then listens for the port using a Node.JS module called SerialPort2. When a signal is received, using the Node.JS Socket.IO module, data is then served also asynchronously to the web providing a real time feed of the Arduino signal.

The tutorial (which can be applied on Linux, Mac OS and Windows) can be found here.

[Via: DangerousPrototypes and The Code Project]

How to turn a pencil drawing into a capacitative sensor for Arduino

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

Nice tutorial about how to make pencil drawings reactive to touch using just pencil, some resistors, paperclips, wire, Arduino and tape.

DIY custom rugged Arduino

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

In this instructable, Dustin Andrews shows how to make a custom Arduino board, equipped with a lcd, a buzzer and a solid enclosure. Dustin’s goal has been to design a rugged Arduino version, that can be employed “as is” in many practical project, in place of a less solid breadboard-based solution.

The project is released under Creative Commons CC-BY license.

[Via: Instructables]

DIY Amp Hour Meter

Thursday, May 17th, 2012

Ever wanted to see how much electricity your next project is consuming? Look no further; this Instructable will guide you about how you can, too, make a device to monitor the same.

This project was developed by Steve Spence of Arduinotronics with input from forum members at the Yahoo Group - Arduino Home and The Arduino Forum.

Steve writes:

“There’s a couple of commercial products that can do this, but not with the flexibility I wanted. I designed an Arduino micro-controller based solution that is very extensible. Right now it monitors the above values of attached gear, and I’m thinking about adding web monitoring and an SD Card for data collection.”