Archive for the ‘Tutorial’ Category

Avoid obstacles, create strategies with Arduino Robot – video tutorial

Monday, October 28th, 2013

infraredRobot

In this third video released by RS Components, Xun and David are going to show you how to deal with ultrasonic range finders, infrared range finders and a trick using ultrabright white LEDs and LDR sensors and in general how to use different technologies to detect obstacles in the way of the Arduino Robot.

In some way ultrasound and infrared operate in the same way: a signal is sent, it bounces on objects and the received echo is used to estimate the distance. With ultrasound, the speed of sound and the time difference between the sent signal and the received one is used, while infrared is more direct as it gives a stronger or weaker reflection depending on how far the signal travels. The estimation of the distance is done via software.

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Logo and Remote control your Arduino Robot – Video tutorial

Friday, October 18th, 2013

Mbanzi_robot

 

RS Components released the second video focused on the first steps with the Arduino Robot with Massimo Banzi, David Cuartielles and Xun Yang:

In this video you will see where to find code examples on the IDE. The robot library comes with two folders named “learn” and “explore” with examples on how to use the software to program the top board – this is the board you will mainly interact with while the motor board runs its original firmware.

One of the first examples of coding on the Arduino Robot is called “LOGO” which is very similar to an early educational programming language that controlled a virtual turtle moving across the screen with simple instructions. This time however, instead of having a small virtual turtle running on a screen, we have a robot that can respond to commands demonstrating a basic example of movement.

“LOGO” invites users to interact with the robot using the keypad to tell the robot whether to move forwards/backwards or to turn left/right. The program can store a series of commands that will then be executed one at a time. (more…)

Arduino Robot video tutorials: RS Components does it again!

Monday, October 14th, 2013

RSComponents - ArduinoRobot

Last year, Arduino and RS Components, collaborated in the creation of 10 video tutorials focused on the Arduino Starter Kit. Some months ago they were released in Creative Commons and are available also on our Youtube channel.

During Maker Faire Rome, at the beginning of October, RS Components together with Massimo Banzi and David Cuartielles, unveiled the release of other five exclusive video tutorials introducing the Arduino Robot and exploring various characteristics of this new open-source hardware on wheels.
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Getting started with Arduino Yún video tutorial

Friday, September 27th, 2013

Getting Started with Yún

 

The Arduino Yún is an Arduino board unlike any other. While programming it is very similar to the Arduino Leonardo and uses the same processor, the Atmel ATmega32U4, it also has an additional processor, an Atheros AR9331, running Linux and the OpenWrt wireless stack. Programming the 32U4 via USB is identical to the Arduino Leonardo. Once you’ve configured the Yún to connect to your WiFi network, you can program the 32U4 via WiFi as well.

We prepared a video to explain how to take the first steps with the board, you can watch it below and then keep reading the Getting Started Guide:

 

 

Hands on: the Arduino Yún’s Bridge

Thursday, September 5th, 2013

arduino yun - handson

The other day, we gave you an overview of the Yún’s hardware. Today, we are going to talk about the Bridge library, describing how it facilitates communication between the two processors. The Arduino Yún has two different processors on-board: an Atheros AR9331 running Linino (a customized OpenWRT GNU/Linux distribution maintained by Dog Hunter) linked through its serial port with an Atmel ATMega32U4 (the same processor as the Leonardo).
The Bridge concerns itself with communication between these two parts of the Yún.

The Bridge is made of two different parts
One part, written in Python, runs on the GNU/Linux processor and has three functions:

  1. it executes programs on the GNU/Linux side, when asked by Arduino.
  2. it provides a shared storage space, useful for sharing data like sensor readings between the Arduino and the Internet
  3. it receives commands coming from the Internet and passes them directly to the Arduino

The other part of Bridge is the library that runs on the 32U4. The library allows you to access the Linino parts of Bridge through your sketches. (more…)

DIY Bicycle Computer with Arduino – auch auf Deutsch

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

DIY bike computer videotutorial

This month we are going to work outdoor because Max is going to show us how  to make a DIY computer to customize our bicycle, collecting data of distances and speed. Watch the video tutorial in german language below and take a look at the schematics and the code.  Looking forward to your hacks!

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Diesen Monat geht es ab nach Draußen, denn Max zeigt uns wie man einen DIY Computer für ein Fahrrad bauen kann, welcher Daten über die Strecke und die Geschwindigkeit mit einem Arduino UNO ermittelt. Seht euch das deutschsprachige Video an und schaut euch den Schaltplan, die Komponenten und den Code an. Wir freuen uns auf eure Hacks!

Arduino Starter Kit video tutorials now released in Creative Commons

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

StarterKitVideotutorial

Last year to celebrate the launch of the new Arduino Starter KitRS Components in collaboration with Arduino,  produced  10 video tutorials featuring Massimo Banzi showing how to create cool projects with the redesigned release of the Kit and all its components.

 

Today RS Components announced on their Twitter and Google+ that the Arduino video tutorials are now marked with a Creative Commons license, that means that you can remix and reuse them as you like. (All the the sketches are available in the Arduino IDE)

We created a Playlist on Arduino official Channel and soon we’ll add also German and French subtitles.

 

How to control Arduino board using an Android phone

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

Arduino Android

Kerimil, user on Arduino Forum, submitted us his  project which focuses on establishing communication between an Arduino board and an android mobile using bluetooth:

The idea is to gain access to hardware on Android devices (accelerometers, gyro, wifi connectivity, gps, GPRS, touchscreen, text to speech and speech to text) and/or use it to relay data to the internet. MIT’s app inventor was used to write a custom app in this example. The code can be easily modified to create your own apps.

You can watch his video below and read the complete tutorial on this page.

Jugando a SuperTux Cart con Arduino Esplora – Video tutorial

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

videotutorial supertux spanish

(en español a continuación)

Last April we launched the first of a series of video tutorial in german language with the aim of exploring cool projects with Arduino boards. Now we are happy to announce we are starting a collaboration with Pablo Murillo from Arduteka to create video tutorials in spanish language to be published  on the official Arduino channel on Youtube.

Starting today you can enjoy a step-by-step tutorial to understand how use your Arduino Esplora  as a customized computer gamepad to play any of your videogames.

The code is configured to be suitable for SuperTuxKart, our favorite  open-source racing game!

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El pasado abril se lanzó el primero de una serie de video tutoriales en Alemán, con el objetivo de explorar nuevos proyectos interesantes a desarrollar con Arduino. Hoy estamos felices de anunciar que empezamos una colaboración con Pablo Murillo de Arduteka para crear video tutoriales en Español, que se publicará en el canal oficial de Arduino en Youtube.

A partir de hoy se puede disfrutar de un tutorial paso a paso para entender cómo usar Arduino Esplora como un gamepad personalizado para jugar en cualquiera de sus videojuegos.

El código está configurado para ser utilizado con SuperTuxKart, nuestro juego de carreras de código abierto favorito!

Vintage radio hacked into a docking station

Monday, June 17th, 2013

Vintage radio hacked into a docking station

Mr. Oyvind from Oslo sent us a cool  hack of a 75-years-old radio into an iPhone dock using an Arduino.

On his website you can read the complete tutorial or download the code and below you can have more details on the way he used the board:

the Arduino is used to read the state of the dual potentiometer that controls the volume and then translate this value into a certain number of LEDs being lit on the volume indicator.
I am using a Duemilanove. The code for the project is very simple and can be found here:http://www.build-electronic-circuits.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/radio_ino.zip
  •  An overview of the inside of the dock (very messy, I know ;) )
dock overview
  •  I am using a dual potentiometer (2 pots in one). Here you can see one pot connected to the amplifier on the left to control the volume, and the other connected to the Arduino on the right to read the position of the pot.

dock pot amp arduino

  • Here you can see the 4 wires used to control the volume display connected to digital input 2, 3, 4 and 5 on the left side of the board. And you can see the potentiometer connected to 3.3V, analog input 0 and ground on the right side of the board.

dock connections