Archive for the ‘Software’ Category

Interactive Architectures: Media-TIC and Interactive Buildings

Friday, September 24th, 2010

 

Some time ago I was informed that the surfaces of the amazing Media-TIC building (from Cloud 9 / Enric Ruiz Geli) were Arduino-based, sensing the enviroment/atmosferic changes and offering a 20% saving on climate control:

The building is in the shape of a cube and formed by large iron beams covered in a plastic coating of inflatable bubbles, which offer glimpses of the fluorescent structure of the building. The attractive covering also has a functional utility as a way of regulating light and temperature, primarily preventing 114 tons of CO2 a year from escaping from the building, and offering a 20% saving on climate control.

Every facade of the Media-TIC is different: from the outside, they reveal parts of their interior spaces and give a diverse plasticity, while from the inside they offer spectacular views.

Importing enviroment data from Arduino to Rhino and other 3D programs has become easier with the creation of [GrassHopper] and its practical toolbar [FireFly].

Firefly for Grasshopper / Arduino from Jason K Johnson on Vimeo.

New ways to conceive our spaces, a new use of energy, the upcoming concept of [active houses] are just around the corner. My question is: how can we get rid of 50 years of  misuse (misunderstanding?) of architecture?

A new age is coming, maybe.

Thanks to [PaoloMartini] [LucaBiselli] [thePlan] see also [GrassHopper3D] [firefly] [Media-TIC]

 

 

 

 

 

Arduino 0019 now available.

Saturday, September 4th, 2010

Arduino 0019 is now available from the download page. Changes include:

  • SPI library.
  • The Ethernet library has been refactored to use the new SPI library. Existing sketches will need: #include <SPI.h> added to the top of their code. Just select SPI from the Sketch > Import Library menu.
  • String class
  • A0, A1, etc. aliases for the analog input pins
  • shiftIn() function
  • Added Arduino Pro 5V and Arduino Fio to the boards menu
  • Added control over automatic scrolling and outgoing line endings in the serial monitor

and lots more; see the full list in the release notes.

Overview of the changes coming in Arduino 1.0.

Monday, July 19th, 2010

Over the past few years, the Arduino software has come a long way, in both features and robustness. There are a lot of little things, however, that we never really thought about or that we’d like to change. Arduino 1.0 is our chance to clean up these details and establish a stable platform for the future.

There’s a detailed list of the changes planned or considered for Arduino 1.0 on our development site (hosted by Google Code). The main items include:

Environment:

  • New file extension to replace the .pde borrowed from Processing (issue #13).
  • Redesigned toolbar icons (issue #291).
  • Ability to upload sketches using an in-system programmer (ISP) from the IDE (issue #260).
  • Simplifying the process of selecting your board and serial port (issues #223 and #257).
  • Command-line compilation and uploading of sketches (issue #124).

Language (most of these are possibilities and still open for discussion):

  • Creating events that can be called automatically, e.g. the serialEvent() as in Processing (issue #263).
  • Adding specific functions for enabling / disabling the internal pullup resistors (issue #246).
  • Modifying the behavior of print() on bytes (issue #284).
  • Functions for accessing more of the low-level functionality of the hardware timers and other peripherals (issues #169 and #248).
  • Optimizing the digitalWrite() function (issue #140).

Of course, we’ll continue to make improvements and additions to the software after Arduino 1.0, but that by making the incompatible changes together, we’ll make the transition clearer and easier. Once you’ve adopted your code to Arduino 1.0, it should continue to work going forward.

If you have questions, comments or suggestions, feel free to respond here or to post on the individual items. Contributions are welcome; please sign up for the developers mailing list if you’re interested in working on the Arduino software.

Improved support for third-party hardware in Arduino 0018

Sunday, February 7th, 2010

Given the increasing numbers of boards and microcontrollers to which people have ported the Arduino core libraries, we wanted to make it easier to add third-party hardware to the Arduino development environment. The recently released Arduino 0018 (download) adds support for the installation of contributed cores and board definitions within the Arduino sketchbook folder. This saves you from having to dig around within the Arduino application as was required in previous versions and also ensures that the boards will remain when you upgrade to newer Arduino releases.

To install, simply place the third-party hardware folder in a sub-folder of the “hardware” folder of your sketchbook folder (see the instructions on the environment page). When you relaunch Arduino, the new boards will automatically appear in your Tools > Board menu and code will compile using their custom core libraries. To put together an installable platform for a particular hardware configuration, see the platforms page in the Arduino Google Code project.

This support isn’t perfect yet, but we hope it will make it easier to work with other hardware from within the Arduino development environment. If you have suggestions, please send them to the developers mailing list or post them in the Google Code issues list.

New library folder (and compilation process) in Arduino 0017.

Saturday, August 15th, 2009

As of Arduino 0017, you can install contributed libraries into the libraries sub-directory of your sketchbook directory. Moving libraries outside of the Arduino application directory means that the libraries will stay installed when you upgrade to a new release of the Arduino software. It also means that, on the Mac, you don’t need to search around inside the new Arduino.app to install a library.

Before installing your first library, you’ll need to create the libraries directory. Then, simply unzip the library into it. When you restart Arduino, the library should appear in the Sketch > Import Library menu. Any examples for the library should show up in the Files > Examples menu.

Your sketchbook is typically stored in a directory called Arduino in your documents directory. The exact location is shown in the preferences dialog in the Arduino software.

Extra note for developers and Linux users: In Arduino 0017, libraries are no longer pre-compiled when you make a selection from the board menu. Instead, they are compiled with your sketch, like the Arduino core. This means that you don’t need to delete .o files when making changes to a library’s source code. It also means that Arduino shouldn’t write to any files in its application directory, making it easier to install on Linux. Plus, there’s no more delay when switching boards.

Go Go Gobetwino

Wednesday, March 18th, 2009

Since we started the Southern Scandinavia Arduino meetings last year, Mikael would pop up to show his latest music instrument, discuss about some funky projects or just drink a cup of coffee. During our last meeting in Malmo, he came out with his best kept secret: Gobetwino, a Windows program that can link Arduino boards with anything software. There are many approaches to connect Arduino with software packages, but he takes the one of hacking one of the most useful MS Windows features: it is possible to call any programs by means of keystrokes, and it is possible to generate keystroke-like events via software.

Gobetwino by M. Morup, picture by D. Sjunnesson

Gobetwino by M. Morup, picture by D. Sjunnesson

Gobetwino will log data into a file, send you an email, type into a word document or an excel sheet, send a command to Arduino on email arrival… The only backdrop of this amazing piece of code is that it won’t run in my Ubuntu-powered laptop! The software is currently freeware in its revision 0.5 and Mikael promises in his website he will open source it in the future, once the code has been cleaned up and the Danish comments have been translated (believe me, you don’t want Danish-commented source… or maybe you do) . It comes with a 35 pages manual that will guide you through the configurations needed to make Gobetwino open files, send emails, and report to Arduino. If you want to help Mikael with further developing Gobetwino, go ahead, stress-test it in your computer and report the bugs to him.

Mikael Moerup is an artist and designer living and working in Copenhagen, Denmark. He was part of The Lab, a defunct media space in the center of the Danish capital, builds crazy music instruments, likes chocolate, and has the ability of finding cheap-but-cool LCDs with red backlight!

Here we go! Download Gobetwino directly here!

Going for a one night hack

Thursday, February 19th, 2009

If you have nothing better to do during a winter night in Sweden, you can always hack a couple of libraries together and make a third one. SDplayWAV is for people interested in playing sounds from SD cards. Builds upon previous work by Ladyada, Ronald Riegel, and Michael Smith.

I felt like shooting a movie out of tonight’s work. The camera wasn’t that good, but youtube video annotations made my night ;-)

Arduino’s IDE on Editra

Monday, October 6th, 2008

Alexander Olivares from the Cenditel Foundation in Venezuela sent us today an email about their latest development in Open Hardware; since their foundation is not supporting Java for different reasons, they have been putting some effort since our visit there and are quite happy to present their first version of their plugin of Arduino for Editra.

picture (c) 2008 by Alexander Olivares at the Cenditel Foundation, Venezuela

The way it has been implemented is as a plugin for the open source editor/compiler Editra, the current version supports:

  • Code compiler
  • Code upload to Arduino compatible boards
  • Serial monitor for Arduino
  • Spanish internationalization
  • Arduino preferences panel
  • Frame configuration

This of course presents lots of advantages for users running linux based operating systems with low processing power where Java is not really an option. From the Arduino Team we are happy to see this development and we would love to see it going further and eventually becoming a debian installation package what would make things even easier for many linux users out there.

The plugin has been made in Spanish, if there is anybody interested in contacting Alexander (aolivares AT SPAMFREE cenditel DOT gob.ve) and translating this into other languages, we will be more than happy to host the documentation on the Playground and the other wikis.

Arduino's IDE on Editra

Monday, October 6th, 2008

Alexander Olivares from the Cenditel Foundation in Venezuela sent us today an email about their latest development in Open Hardware; since their foundation is not supporting Java for different reasons, they have been putting some effort since our visit there and are quite happy to present their first version of their plugin of Arduino for Editra.

picture (c) 2008 by Alexander Olivares at the Cenditel Foundation, Venezuela

The way it has been implemented is as a plugin for the open source editor/compiler Editra, the current version supports:

  • Code compiler
  • Code upload to Arduino compatible boards
  • Serial monitor for Arduino
  • Spanish internationalization
  • Arduino preferences panel
  • Frame configuration

This of course presents lots of advantages for users running linux based operating systems with low processing power where Java is not really an option. From the Arduino Team we are happy to see this development and we would love to see it going further and eventually becoming a debian installation package what would make things even easier for many linux users out there.

The plugin has been made in Spanish, if there is anybody interested in contacting Alexander (aolivares AT SPAMFREE cenditel DOT gob.ve) and translating this into other languages, we will be more than happy to host the documentation on the Playground and the other wikis.

Arduino meets the XO Laptop

Thursday, December 27th, 2007

Brian Jepson posted some useful instructions on how to run Arduino on the XO laptop recently. He and Gian Vilamil have both commented on the XO as the ideal Arduino development platform due to its cost and relative simplicity.

Please enter a valid email to subscribe

Confirm your email address

We need to confirm your email address.
To complete the subscription, please click the link in the email we just sent you.

Thank you for subscribing!

Arduino
via Egeo 16
Torino, 10131
Italy