Archive for the ‘Facebook’ Category

Today we celebrate 100.000 fans on Facebook: thanks to all of you!

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

100k_fb

Since last February our Arduino page on Facebook has been growing fast and today  we’re celebrating 100.000 fans: if you have an account on it, we invite you to join us and our passionate community on Facebook!

United States, India and Italy are the countries giving more “likes” to the page, but we receive videos, pictures and inquires from all over the world.

100k fans

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WISP: a WiFi module for the Internet-of-Things

Tuesday, June 12th, 2012

embdSocial™ is an Internet-of-Things (IoT) platform usable to provide communication support to smart objects and devices. embdSocial™ is based on WISP™, an electronic module that can be connected to any microcontroller-equipped device (such as an Arduino board, by means of ad-hoc shield) to exploit several communication services:

Each WISP™ allows real-time bi-directional communication through our secure, globally accessible API. In addition to merely providing internet connectivity, embdSocial™ provides one interface and architecture that simplifies common tasks through the use of plug-ins:

  • Tweeting/receiving @messages
  • Updating Facebook statuses
  • Sending/receiving emails
  • Sending/receiving SMS text messages
  • Manipulating files in your Dropbox

Each WISP™ is equipped with a 802.11 network interface (with support to WEP, WPA and WPA2 protocols) which allows the device to be easily connected with the embdSocial™’s servers; moreover, its configuration is completely web-based.

More information can be found on the embdSocial™ homepage, together with a couple of videos presenting its capabilities.

[Via: HackADay and embdSocial]

How Arduino helped him win a hackathon: Locksmasher

Sunday, June 3rd, 2012

While browsing Hacker News, I came across this interesting account of Andrei Pop [blog, twitter] which tells about how he won a recent Facebook hackathon using an arduino hack.

It is a recent trend that hardware too has entered the hackathon scenario. Here are interesting excerpts from his honest account!

A few months ago 3 friends and I participated in the facebook hackathon at UBC. It was a 36 hour, redbull-fueled affair in which quite a few teams participated. We won. I’m not telling you this story to brag, I want to share with you what I learned. In all honesty, I was shocked we won, but I think that sticking to a couple of principles helped:

1. Don’t compete with your second best arsenal

2. Solve a real problem

3. Breadth instead of depth can pay off

Yes, you’ve heard this advice before and there are exceptions to every rule… I’m just sharing my personal experience.

Our team consisted of a designer, a biomedical engineer (who didn’t write a single line of code), a CS student (without a doubt the most “qualified” of all of us), and myself (a Political Science grad). I was the only non-engineering-educated person in the room. One essential lesson I have learned over and over in life is that it is futile to compete on a metric that you cannot possibly be the best at. Don’t compete with your second best arsenal. You need to find the edge that nobody else will think of, or where nobody else can be. If the competition can outspend you, outmanouever them. If the guy at the bar is better looking, be funnier. And if most of the guys in the room have PhDs in CS, go for hardware?

The night before the hackathon I picked up an arduino microcontroller, a few LEDs, some alligator clips, and a breadboard. I didn’t really know how things would come together, but I had spent some time hardware hacking and I was really interested in physical computing. I also figured that most of the guys in the room wouldn’t be thinking about hardware (this was a facebook hackathon, most people were looking up the Open Graph API). I hoped hardware would be our edge, and as it turns out, it was.

After a bit of brainstorming and chinese food we agreed to build Locksmasher – an arduino powered unlocking mechanism that would handle authentication through the Open Graph API. We wanted to create a way to grant one-time access to facebook friends that need to get into your house.

Half an hour into our brainstorming, one of my team members had to leave the hackathon to let a friend into his house. This event sparked the idea of locksmasher and outlines my second point – solve a real problem. A craft for a craft’s sake can often be futile. There are definitely exceptions to this, but most of the time, start with a defined problem and apply your craft, instead of the other way around. The judges loved that they could personally relate to the problem of needing to let someone into their house when they weren’t home.

Our hack was very simple – it was nothing more than a glorified switch that talked to facebook. Graeham (our biomedical engineer) hooked up an old door lock to the arduino for our demo. Yazad (the CS student) and I wrote a NodeJS server to talk to facebook. We spent most of our time dealing with authentication, a problem that could have been solved in a few hours by a better hacker who knows the facebook API well. In the meantime Vince (our designer) made everything look very beautiful. This brings me to my last point point, sometimes breadth is better than depth. I want to credit a tremendous amount of our success to Vince’s design work and Graeham’s hardware. By the end of the 36 hours, we had addressed a little bit of everything.

Most of the hackers in the room built some very elegant projects; machine learning algorithms, recommendation algorithms based on your friends likes, data parsing applications. However many of the projects were elegant for elegance sake and didn’t solve a pain point that the judges could relate to. Furthermore, they didn’t look at the whole package (arguably not necessary for a hackathon but I certainly think our sleek UI helped win over the crowd).

It easily highlights arduino’s adaptability to hooking with various technologies. It truly comes out as the bridge between hardware and software.

The project demo lies here.

Any hackathons worldwide in which our readers have used their Arduino? Please do link the demo or your blog :) We would love to read!

Via:[designcodelearn,HackerNews]

How popular is the dress that you are purchasing?

Sunday, May 6th, 2012

A sparsely known fashion label C&A introduces a new initiative called ‘Fashion-like’ in it’s Brazillian store. A unique feature to import ‘likes’ on a particular clothing as compared to another may interest other labels too!

In an age when the ‘likes’ can be bought and influenced using facebook Ads, maybe if an unbiased way of finding that out is tailored, it may prove to be the next generation deciding feature in fashion and apparel design.

This is doable using an Arduino too! Probably with a lot more features!

Is there a maker in the house? ;)

Via:[TheVerge]

Social Fuel For Your Car: Travel With A Little Help From Your Friends

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

Impressing automotive hacking lets this FIAT car moving by the number of “like” from the Guarana Antarctica Facebook Fan Page. The advertising idea is simple: let the social audience support this Sau Paulo to Salvador trip to reach the Carnivalby commenting / “liking” the page. The onboard Arduino ADK (connected to a tablet and the internet) allows the car going on by a certain amount of meters (apparently one “like” is 10 meters, while each comment lets the car go ahead for 20 meters).

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Giant Arduino "Like" Button Gets Your Social Experience Physical

Friday, September 9th, 2011

[Quasimondo] made an interesting exhibition project that can easily become a museum furniture.

this Arduino-based Facebook “Like” button by Mario Klingemann will be on display at the Ultra Social exhibition, a part of the UAMO Festival in Munich.

via [Make]

Giant Arduino “Like” Button Gets Your Social Experience Physical

Friday, September 9th, 2011

[Quasimondo] made an interesting exhibition project that can easily become a museum furniture.

this Arduino-based Facebook “Like” button by Mario Klingemann will be on display at the Ultra Social exhibition, a part of the UAMO Festival in Munich.

via [Make]

The Rhythm of City

Thursday, April 7th, 2011

This is an art project born as the collaboration between Varvara Guljajeva and Mar Canet. During the last couple of years they have been collaborating in the creation of several interactive installations, some of them containing Arduino boards. The Rythm of City is about to be presented in the following weeks at the Czec Festival Enter5 and has pretty good online documentation, so I think it is interesting to show it here.

 

2011 Rythms by Canet and Guljajeva

(c) 2011 Rythms by Canet and Guljajeva


The Rhythm of City(2011) is a mixed reality real-time artwork that applies geo-located social data for an artistic purpose. It is an art installation that explains in original way digital geo-located social content and characterizes cities [...] Moreover, we would like to give an alternative meaning and purpose to the location-specific invisible online data. In short, the artwork makes invisible information visible and even audible.

[...] Important thing is that we do not rely on single social network but multiple. At the moment we are applying Twitter, Youtube, and Flickr. We plan extend our selection.

The installation controls 10 metronomes via servomotors using one Arduino Mega2560, The data to decide whether the metronome should be active and how active it should be is taken from geo-tagged posts to social networks. The following video hints how it works with 5 linked cities represented by 5 metronomes:

For more information visit Varvara Guljajeva or Mar Canet‘s personal websites, this blog explaining the process, the technical diagram, or the festival page with information where to see the piece in action this April.

Arduino Is Getting SocialArduino Is Getting SocialArduino Is Getting Social

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010

 

Facebook Fan Page

And we didn’t need a Fb poll to tell that! Click on the image to vote (well…if you happen to have a Fb account)

 

 

 

Facebook Fan Page

And we didn’t need a Fb poll to tell that! Click on the image to vote (well…if you happen to have a Fb account)

 

Facebook Fan Page

And we didn’t need a Fb poll to tell that! Click on the image to vote (well…if you happen to have a Fb account)

 

Arduino Is Getting SocialArduino Is Getting SocialArduino Is Getting Social

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010

 

Facebook Fan Page

And we didn’t need a Fb poll to tell that! Click on the image to vote (well…if you happen to have a Fb account)

 

 

 

Facebook Fan Page

And we didn’t need a Fb poll to tell that! Click on the image to vote (well…if you happen to have a Fb account)

 

Facebook Fan Page

And we didn’t need a Fb poll to tell that! Click on the image to vote (well…if you happen to have a Fb account)

 

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