Archive for the ‘shield’ Category

Program sound effects for your guitar with pedalSHIELD

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

pedalshield

pedalSHIELD by Electrosmash, is a programmable Arduino open-source guitar pedal made for guitarists, hackers and programmers. It plugs into an Arduino Due and allows you to program effects in C/C++ or download ready effects from the online library. (more…)

Monitoring and visualising dual temperature and humidity sensor

Friday, January 10th, 2014

Plotly

We recently featured Plotly and discovered how easy it is to analyse and beautifully visualize  data using their platform and API.

Now they shared with us a simple instructable to show to Arduino Community a hands-on experiment with ambient sensors:

The purpose of this instructable is to demonstrate how to hook up an Arduino + Ethernet Shield  and send data to Plot.ly’s Servers and create beautiful graphs. We will be using a dual temperature+humidity sensor (DHT22), and sending the results directly to Plotly. (more…)

An interactive Twitter clock with a vintage twist

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Tweety

Johannes Hoffmann is an interaction and graphic designer sharing with us his  hand-made Tweety Clock. It’s a vintage but interactive Twitter clock , built with Arduino and Ethernet Shield, and featured with the original ‘cuckooo’ sound and a little printer for the output. (more…)

Rubber band launcher: no droids were harmed!

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

Anniken Andee

Jonathan from Anikken wrote us to show how Andee is more than just a Bluetooth shield. Not only does it allow to wirelessly connect and control the Arduino from any Android phone, but it comes with its own library for the Arduino IDE, to easily customise the smartphone user interface by doing the coding in the Arduino IDE itself without  any Android programming.

He then created some action with it producing a Rubber band launcher and a cool video to see how it works:

I got the inspiration to build this rubber band launcher after watching a video of a rubber band gattling gun. I originally intended to build a rubber band gattling gun turret that I can control with my smartphone using stuff that I could find in my home and office.

Unfortunately, I didn’t have enough materials lying around to get it done. Instead, using whatever I had, I improvised and made a simpler version – the Rubber Band Launcher Mark I. (I’m calling it Mark I because I’m in the process of upgrading this model).

(more…)

Batman Inspired Indoor Localization

Friday, October 25th, 2013

Batman Inspired Indoor Localization

Last August Arduino Tour landed in Singapore, hosted by The Hub Singapore. Davide Gomba held a workshop there and met a lot of cool people during the hackathon happening in the same days. Ted, one of the participants, submitted to our blog the Indoor Localization (see video below) project  he prototyped with his team during the 24 hours CodeXtreme hours:

Our idea is to convert existing speakers inside shopping malls into an indoor localization beacon. This allows malls to track the location density without adding extensive infrastructure since it uses embedded inaudible sound signatures in music that shops play in the malls. In short, instead of tracking Joker, we use Arduino (with WiFI Shield & MP3 Shield) and Android to track people (customer) inside a mall.

(more…)

Let your Arduino talk with your Android

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

Annikken

Annikken Andee is a Bluetooth Arduino shield, currently on an Indiegogo campaign, that let  Arduino communicate with  Android device without writing Android code.

With the growing popularity of smart phones in this time and era it’s interesting to explore how Arduino could tap on the strength of smart phones – touch screen capability and smart phone capability. However for the integration to work, one has to develop the corresponding Smart phone app to handle the bluetooth communication and provide a stable GUI on the screen.

Therefore to make things easier for Arduino developers who wish to tap on the power on smartphone, the Singapore-based team came up Annikken Andee project, an Arduino shield, with supporting resources, that performs primarily the following actions:

  • handles the communication between Android and Arduino
  • GUI creation on smartphone by coding on Arduino. Requires no Smartphone App programming
  • accesses to Smartphone functions from Arduino Library
  • provides larger, portable and non-volatile storage

The shield communicates with Arduino via the ICSP header (SPI) and pin 8. An SD card Reader is available for external data storage for Arduino –  for huge data storage or extended period of data logging activity by Arduino. As Android has yet to support for Bluetooth 4.0/BLE, they are using bluetooth 2.1 module WT11i by Bluegiga for communicating with the Android phone. Currently the shield supports Arduino Uno, Mega and Leonardo.

Robin, part of the Team Annikken Ande, wrote us:

With Andee, Arduino user can program the UI on their Android phone by downloading the Andee Arduino Library onto their Arduino IDE and the Andee Android App into their Android phone from google play store. Using the functions in the Arduino library, user can easily design the UI on the Andee Android App without touching Android programming.

As we hope to spread the news of this invention to as many people as possible, we believe that arduino.cc is the perfect place to help us make this work.

 

 

 

Monitoring falcons with intelligent nests

Monday, June 24th, 2013

horus - falcon

The Lesser Kestrel (Falco naumanni) is a small falcon at the center of HORUS, a project aiming to develop a system for automatic real-time monitoring of colonial falcons at Doñana Biological Station, a public Research Institute in Spain.

The falcons breed in nest-boxes on the window sills which the  research team converted into “smart nest-boxes”: they have sensors to identify the falcons entering the box using RFID tags, but also cameras and other equipment controlled by and Arduino Mega.

 

Horus project

(more…)

How close are we to doomsday? A clock is calculating it in real time

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

neurotic armageddon by  tom schofield

 

Tom Schofield created an installation artwork which visualises the ‘Doomsday Clock’, a symbolic clock maintained by an academic journal, ‘The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists’ which:

conveys how close humanity is to catastrophic destruction–the figurative midnight–and monitors the means humankind could use to obliterate itself. First and foremost, these include nuclear weapons, but they also encompass climate-changing technologies and new developments in the life sciences that could inflict irrevocable harm.

(more…)

Make a voice call with Arduino Gsm Shield & more examples!

Tuesday, March 19th, 2013

Arduino Gsm Shield

Some days ago we launched our new product, the Arduino Gsm Shield, together with an intro video explaining how to make the first steps into the creation of interaction with it.
Today we’re publishing another video with a second step-by-step tutorial by David:

 

 

And we want to share some more because last year at the Malmo University K3 during the second year in Interaction Design BA, David Cuartielles and Tony Olsson run a course where students had to work on a project with state of the art of technology using wireless communication as a main mode of operation.

As one of the tools, 30 students could experiment with early prototypes of the GSM shield  and they came out with different projects and ideas.  Here you can see one of the proposals that made it to the finals at a M2M contest arranged in Sweden by Tele2. (more…)

Data-logging made simple with Arduino

Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

One of the best capabilities provided by Arduino regards its very high modularity, which helps users to quickly translate ideas into physical artifact, as practically demonstrated by Mauro, which shows on his blog how to build a simple data-logger by properly combining different shields. By using few additional components (mainly resistors and buttons) a fully-functional data logger can be easily implemented.

More information can be found here.

[Via: Mauro Alfieri's blog]