Archive for the ‘Sharp RangeFinder’ Category

Samsa II, The Hexapod

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

[pabloxid] shared an Hexapod project on the forum based on an Arduino MEGA 1280 and 18 Dynamixel AX-12 motors:

SAMSA is based on the Wiring board, with an ATmega128 microcontroller, and SAMSA II on the Arduino Mega, with an ATmega1280. Both are pretty similar, tough the ATmega1280 has 8 KB SRAM, twice the ATmega128. For SAMSA II the Arduino IDE was not used. The software was written directly in C++, using some libraries from both Arduino and Wiring.

SAMSA II has also two additional microcontrollers. One is an old Arduino Mini (ATmega168) located in the head, tasked with handling the sensors. The other is an ATmega8 and is integrated in the display. The firmware in the display was replaced with another one, freeing the main microcontroller from handling the display pixel by pixel, storing the frame buffer, etc.

The head’s microcontroller is responsible for sampling, filtering and processing sensor’s data. The data from the Sharp distance sensor and the lateral IR sensors are combined in a single “super smart distance sensor”. This microcontroller also decodes the data coming from the 38 KHz IR receiver, used for the Remote Control.

These two additional microcontrollers further reduce the load on the main microcontroller, allowing for more sophisticated behaviours.

(more…)

Bat Goggles For Visually Impaired From USI

Tuesday, March 8th, 2011

It seems like part of the Arduino projects lately hang around “visually impaired” solutions. This is the research from Alex Tomic form USI in Lugano.

The “Bat Goggles” are a general-purpose set of visual aids to assist those with low or no vision to sense obstacles. While the original project envisioned the sensors being attached as part of a helmet or eyeglasses, after experimentation it was determined that the tool is much more useful if the proximity sensors are movable, allowing them to be placed on the hands, feet, knees, or any other extremity. This allows more flexibility in exploration of environments and extending the effective range of the extremity.

In a free-moving use case, the user holds sensors in each hand. The proximity sensors serve as a virtual extension of the user’s hand, allowing him or her to check for the existence of objects without touching them. This can be useful in situations where it may be desirable to detect delicate objects that could be damaged if touched with excessive force (eg. a vase or lamp).

Check out project and review(pdf).

via [AlexTomicProjectPage]



HALO For The Visually Impaired

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Happy to discover the HALO project actually won the HUMANA Contest. Check out the other winners. HALO (Haptic Assisted Locating of Obstacles) is a solution for visually impaired people to perceive obstacles around them. Here’s a little description:

I recently watched an episode of Stan Lee’s Superhumans which featured a blind
man who used a series of clicks, like a bat, to echo locate his surroundings. I
got to thinking about other blind people and their ability to navigate freely –
without the use of a guide dog or cane. I came up with the idea to use a series
of rangefinders that would take input from sensors and output feedback to pulse
vibration motors placed on a person’s head. As a person gets closer to an object
the intensity and frequency of the vibration would increase – it’s directly
proportional to the distance of an object. If a region was lacking feedback,
then it would be safe to proceed in that direction.

I call my submission the H.A.L.O. – the Haptic Assisted Locating of Obstacles. I
believe this can serve very useful for the visually impaired to have the freedom
to possibily move about hands-free without the assistance of a cane or seeing
eye dog. Technology has undoubtedly made our daily lives better. By using a few
inexpensive components and sensors, I’ve made a device that will allow the blind
to navigate their surroundings and avoid collisions.

via [Instructables] also seen on [ITnews] [WareGround]

Sharp Rangefinder DemystifiedSharp Rangefinder DemystifiedSharp Rangefinder Demystified

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

 

Some days ago a on the Arduino Forum [jezuz] shared a link that I found really exhaustive in choosing among the different flavours of Sharp Rangefinders.

Over the years, Sharp has introduced a family of infra-red detectors.  These detectors boast a small package, very little current consumption, and a variety of output options.  This article offers an overview of the various types, information on interfacing them, and hints and tips.

I’ve always found this sensor very useful and suitable for a lot of projects. One of his cons is a less sensibility towards black objects. [cr0sh] explains it:

That’s because black absorbs IR (and a whole host of other frequencies in the visible range – hence, black); a ping-style ultrasonic sensor likewise has issues with non-uniform surfaces, and more seriously with soft objects like pillows (or other sound-absorbing material).

There is no one “do it all” sensor for ranging, unfortunately (with the exception of possibly LIDAR coupled with extensive mapping and processing – not something that is cheap or even doable with only an Arduino). So you need to combine sensors and then integrate the data that they produce so your system can gain a better idea of what is “out there”.

read-on the conversation to the [Arduino Forum] source [Acroname]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some days ago a on the Arduino Forum [jezuz] shared a link that I found really exhaustive in choosing among the different flavours of Sharp Rangefinders.

Over the years, Sharp has introduced a family of infra-red detectors. These detectors boast a small package, very little current consumption, and a variety of output options. This article offers an overview of the various types, information on interfacing them, and hints and tips.

I’ve always found this sensor very useful and suitable for a lot of projects. One of his cons is a less sensibility towards black objects. [cr0sh] explains it:

That’s because black absorbs IR (and a whole host of other frequencies in the visible range – hence, black); a ping-style ultrasonic sensor likewise has issues with non-uniform surfaces, and more seriously with soft objects like pillows (or other sound-absorbing material).

There is no one “do it all” sensor for ranging, unfortunately (with the exception of possibly LIDAR coupled with extensive mapping and processing – not something that is cheap or even doable with only an Arduino). So you need to combine sensors and then integrate the data that they produce so your system can gain a better idea of what is “out there”.

read-on the conversation to the [Arduino Forum] source [Acroname]

 

Some days ago a on the Arduino Forum [jezuz] shared a link that I found really exhaustive in choosing among the different flavours of Sharp Rangefinders.

Over the years, Sharp has introduced a family of infra-red detectors. These detectors boast a small package, very little current consumption, and a variety of output options. This article offers an overview of the various types, information on interfacing them, and hints and tips.

I’ve always found this sensor very useful and suitable for a lot of projects. One of his cons is a less sensibility towards black objects. [cr0sh] explains it:

That’s because black absorbs IR (and a whole host of other frequencies in the visible range – hence, black); a ping-style ultrasonic sensor likewise has issues with non-uniform surfaces, and more seriously with soft objects like pillows (or other sound-absorbing material).

There is no one “do it all” sensor for ranging, unfortunately (with the exception of possibly LIDAR coupled with extensive mapping and processing – not something that is cheap or even doable with only an Arduino). So you need to combine sensors and then integrate the data that they produce so your system can gain a better idea of what is “out there”.

read-on the conversation to the [Arduino Forum] source [Acroname]

 

 

 

 

Sharp Rangefinder DemystifiedSharp Rangefinder DemystifiedSharp Rangefinder Demystified

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

 

Some days ago a on the Arduino Forum [jezuz] shared a link that I found really exhaustive in choosing among the different flavours of Sharp Rangefinders.

Over the years, Sharp has introduced a family of infra-red detectors.  These detectors boast a small package, very little current consumption, and a variety of output options.  This article offers an overview of the various types, information on interfacing them, and hints and tips.

I’ve always found this sensor very useful and suitable for a lot of projects. One of his cons is a less sensibility towards black objects. [cr0sh] explains it:

That’s because black absorbs IR (and a whole host of other frequencies in the visible range – hence, black); a ping-style ultrasonic sensor likewise has issues with non-uniform surfaces, and more seriously with soft objects like pillows (or other sound-absorbing material).

There is no one “do it all” sensor for ranging, unfortunately (with the exception of possibly LIDAR coupled with extensive mapping and processing – not something that is cheap or even doable with only an Arduino). So you need to combine sensors and then integrate the data that they produce so your system can gain a better idea of what is “out there”.

read-on the conversation to the [Arduino Forum] source [Acroname]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some days ago a on the Arduino Forum [jezuz] shared a link that I found really exhaustive in choosing among the different flavours of Sharp Rangefinders.

Over the years, Sharp has introduced a family of infra-red detectors. These detectors boast a small package, very little current consumption, and a variety of output options. This article offers an overview of the various types, information on interfacing them, and hints and tips.

I’ve always found this sensor very useful and suitable for a lot of projects. One of his cons is a less sensibility towards black objects. [cr0sh] explains it:

That’s because black absorbs IR (and a whole host of other frequencies in the visible range – hence, black); a ping-style ultrasonic sensor likewise has issues with non-uniform surfaces, and more seriously with soft objects like pillows (or other sound-absorbing material).

There is no one “do it all” sensor for ranging, unfortunately (with the exception of possibly LIDAR coupled with extensive mapping and processing – not something that is cheap or even doable with only an Arduino). So you need to combine sensors and then integrate the data that they produce so your system can gain a better idea of what is “out there”.

read-on the conversation to the [Arduino Forum] source [Acroname]

 

Some days ago a on the Arduino Forum [jezuz] shared a link that I found really exhaustive in choosing among the different flavours of Sharp Rangefinders.

Over the years, Sharp has introduced a family of infra-red detectors. These detectors boast a small package, very little current consumption, and a variety of output options. This article offers an overview of the various types, information on interfacing them, and hints and tips.

I’ve always found this sensor very useful and suitable for a lot of projects. One of his cons is a less sensibility towards black objects. [cr0sh] explains it:

That’s because black absorbs IR (and a whole host of other frequencies in the visible range – hence, black); a ping-style ultrasonic sensor likewise has issues with non-uniform surfaces, and more seriously with soft objects like pillows (or other sound-absorbing material).

There is no one “do it all” sensor for ranging, unfortunately (with the exception of possibly LIDAR coupled with extensive mapping and processing – not something that is cheap or even doable with only an Arduino). So you need to combine sensors and then integrate the data that they produce so your system can gain a better idea of what is “out there”.

read-on the conversation to the [Arduino Forum] source [Acroname]

 

 

 

 

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