Archive for the ‘IR’ Category

Multitouch Music Controller using IR and Arduino

Monday, December 2nd, 2013

Multitouch Controller

 

Amanda Ghassaei (previously featured on Arduino Blog with Glitchbox and Vocal Effect box ) published the instructions to build an Arduino-powered infrared touchscreen / coffee-table interface that she’s been using to control various music and graphics applications on her computer.

Multitouch Controller - Arduino

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A simple Arduino-based tachometer

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

 

Chris, from PyroElectro.com, proposes a comprehensive tutorial on how to make a simple, yet effective, Arduino-based tachometer.
The circuit is very simple: an IR led is coupled with an IR phototransistor to detect possible interruptions of the light beam, while the Arduino is responsible to calculate the time interval between two such events. Finally, a LCD is used to display the current RPM to the user.
To validate his project, a typical computer fan has been used in the set-up and the outcomes have demonstrated to be very close to the true RPM value (2600 +/- 100 RPMs).
The bill of materials, as well as the schematic, the source code and a detailed tutorial on how to build the circuit is available here.

[Via: PyroElectro.com]

 

Space experiments for everyone: the ArduSat project

Tuesday, June 19th, 2012

ArduSat, which stands for “Arduino satellite”, is a recently kickstarted project that aims at developing an open platform usable to emulate space scientists:

Once launched, the ArduSat will be the first open platform allowing the general public to design and run their own space-based applications, games and experiments, steer the onboard cameras to take pictures on-demand, and even broadcast personalized messages back to Earth.

ArduSat will be equipped with several sensors (such as cameras, gyros, accelerometers, GPS and more) packed inside a small cube (the side will be approximately 10 cm long) that can be accessed through a set of Arduinos.

Once in orbit, the ArduSat will be accessible from the ground to flash the required firmware for the experiments and for getting back all the collected information. People interested in performing space experiments will have access to a ground replica of ArduSat explotable to test and debug their code before the actual deployment.

The project is very ambitious, and it is expected that such an open accessible space platform will have a considerable impact on how simple space experiments will be carried out in the forthcoming years, in the case of fundraising success.

You may find the Kickstarter page of the project here.

[Via: Hack A Day and Kickstarter]

Samsa II, The Hexapod

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

[pabloxid] shared an Hexapod project on the forum based on an Arduino MEGA 1280 and 18 Dynamixel AX-12 motors:

SAMSA is based on the Wiring board, with an ATmega128 microcontroller, and SAMSA II on the Arduino Mega, with an ATmega1280. Both are pretty similar, tough the ATmega1280 has 8 KB SRAM, twice the ATmega128. For SAMSA II the Arduino IDE was not used. The software was written directly in C++, using some libraries from both Arduino and Wiring.

SAMSA II has also two additional microcontrollers. One is an old Arduino Mini (ATmega168) located in the head, tasked with handling the sensors. The other is an ATmega8 and is integrated in the display. The firmware in the display was replaced with another one, freeing the main microcontroller from handling the display pixel by pixel, storing the frame buffer, etc.

The head’s microcontroller is responsible for sampling, filtering and processing sensor’s data. The data from the Sharp distance sensor and the lateral IR sensors are combined in a single “super smart distance sensor”. This microcontroller also decodes the data coming from the 38 KHz IR receiver, used for the Remote Control.

These two additional microcontrollers further reduce the load on the main microcontroller, allowing for more sophisticated behaviours.

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Multi-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino MegaMulti-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino MegaMulti-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino Mega

Monday, October 25th, 2010

 

Possible low-end solution for multi-touch surfaces based on Arduino Mega:

So i’ve been working on this project for a while now as part of my thesis and independently and work is still continuing. So just an overview the project is a multi-touch and multi-modal input sensor that can be utilised behind traditional LCD panels utilising a new method to detect inputs. By using a large IR sensor array consisting of 128 sensors behind the LCD panel and IR light source in front of the Panel we are able to augment the display with the ability to sense a variety of objects near or on the surface; including fingers tips and hands and thus permitting us to enable multi-touch interaction. The inherent nature of the senors allows us to create a low cost high fidelity image sensor allowing us to take advantage of optical sensing which also allows other physical items to be detected, and thus permits us to develop multi-modal interaction schemas.

Amazingly done with Processing and a simple Arduino Mega board.

via [ArduinoForum] source [mtaha]

 

 

 

Multi-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino MegaMulti-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino MegaMulti-touch Input Sensor based of Arduino Mega

Monday, October 25th, 2010

 

Possible low-end solution for multi-touch surfaces based on Arduino Mega:

So i’ve been working on this project for a while now as part of my thesis and independently and work is still continuing. So just an overview the project is a multi-touch and multi-modal input sensor that can be utilised behind traditional LCD panels utilising a new method to detect inputs. By using a large IR sensor array consisting of 128 sensors behind the LCD panel and IR light source in front of the Panel we are able to augment the display with the ability to sense a variety of objects near or on the surface; including fingers tips and hands and thus permitting us to enable multi-touch interaction. The inherent nature of the senors allows us to create a low cost high fidelity image sensor allowing us to take advantage of optical sensing which also allows other physical items to be detected, and thus permits us to develop multi-modal interaction schemas.

Amazingly done with Processing and a simple Arduino Mega board.

via [ArduinoForum] source [mtaha]

 

 

 

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